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Archive for the ‘John Barclay’ Category

Sometimes when someone does not marry, they really help in the research of a family because they give their estate usually to their siblings, nephews and nieces.  Alexander did just that however, he did not have a will so the estate went into probate because he had money and land.

Alexander's estate

Alexander’s estate

In the above note written by my Aunt Miriam she was correct in stating there were eleven heirs to Alexander’s estate.

In the post “John Barclay’s Two Families” dated April 3, 2010 on this blog, I listed the children both from the 1st and 2nd family of John Barclay the father. I gave a little information about each sibling but didn’t go into each in-depth.

The probate packet of Alexander A. Barclay’s estate consisted of 35 documents. The probate process began sometime in December 1905 and ended April 23, 1907. The total value of the estate was $5500.00. There were two pieces of real estate one in Lakeville, a farm and one in Farmington which consisted of lots. These were sold since no one was interested in the property. There were mining stocks that were distributed and transferred to the heirs.

I found this add for the sale of A.A. Barclay’s lands in the local newspaper.

The Sale Ad of Alexander Barclay's Land in Farmington

The Sale Ad of Alexander Barclay’s Land in Farmington

It reads:  Farm for Sale Cheap: I offer for sale, subject to the approval of the Judge of Probate for Dakota County, Minnesota, 105 acres of farming lands in section 34 township 114, range 20 in Dakota County, State of Minnesota, at $40.00 per acre.  Also the building on the corner of Third and Elma Streets, belonging to the estate of A.A. Barclay – Deceased. Inquir of H.N. Rogers, administrator, Farmington, Minn.  11-45. 

Here is a review of those who were identified as heirs of Alexander’s estate.

Part of the Heirs at Law form for Alexander Barclay's Estate

Part of the Heirs list, Petition for Administration, by Grace McDonald, for Alexander Barclay’s Estate

The first family of John Barclay and Margaret:

1.  John Avery Barclay born about 1836. He was presumed dead according to an affidavit of the sister Sarah Agnes Blinn.  So his portion of the estate would go to his two children:

“John A. Barclay, aged 70 years, not heard from by relatives during the past 30 years, supposed to be dead, who is a brother. In his place John Avery Barclay, son and Sarah Ellen Barclay Sears were awarded a share each as the only surviving children of the first son.”

1) John Avery Barclay born 1867.

2) Sarah Ellen Barclay Sears born 1869.

2.  James A. Barclay born about 1838 died in 1906 during the probate of Alexander’s estate.

“James A. Barclay, aged 68 years, residing at 1444 Stratford Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. who is a brother.”

3.  Sarah Agnes Barclay Blinn born about 1840.

“Sarah Agnes Blinn, aged 66 years residing at 1375 [New] Dalles Ave, Alamirda, Cal., who is a sister. Note: I think they mean Alameda, California.”

4.  Mary J. Barclay Ford born about 1841.

“Mary J. Ford, aged 65 years, residing at Bristol., Conn., who is a sister.”

5.  Alexander Barclay the deceased, would fit here in the ages of the children.

6.  Martha M. Barclay Ford born about 1843.

“Martha M. Ford, aged 65 years residing at Fruitvale, Cal., who is a sister.”

7.  George Angus Barclay born 1844 died 1898. Grace his daughter would be the one to inherit from Alexander.  Grace started out as the Administrator of the estate but because she was pregnant with Miriam at the time she could not attend to the legal process and another person was appointed.

“Grace A. McDonald of the Village of International Falls, in the County of Itasca and the State of Minnesota, respectfully shows that Alexander A. Barclay was a resident of the Village of Farmington in the County of Dakota and State of Minnesota, died on the 9 December, A.D. 1905 at the City of Rochester in the County of Olmsted, State of Minnesota, leaving estate therein and without leaving any last Will and Testament to the knowledge, information or belief of your petitioner. That the name relationship, ages and residences of the heirs of said deceased, as far as known to your petitioner, are as follows….”  

“Grace A. McDonald, aged 28 years, residing at International Falls, Itasca Co., Minn who is a niece (daughter of Geo. A. Barclay brother of deceased).”  Note: Grace was born 1882 so she would be 23 years old.

Here we list the half-siblings from John Barclay’s second marriage to Ellen:

8. Charles Barclay born 1860.

“Charles Barclay, aged 45 years, residing at Shakopee, Minn., who is a half-brother.”

9. William Barclay born 1863

“William Barclay, aged 43 years, residing at Pony, Madison Co., Montana, who is a half-brother.”

10.  Mary E. Barclay Clark born about 1864.

“Mary Clark aged 42 years, residing at Bridger, Carbon Co., Montana, age 42 years, who is a half-sister.”

11. Anna Elizabeth Barclay Carter  born 1870.

“Annie E. Carter, aged 36 years, residing at 2050 11 St. Marinette, Wis, who is a half-sister.”

It cost me a small fortune to obtain the probate file of Alexander Barclay but it was worth it.  I have always known that Alexander would be of great help to me.

In the next posts I will share some of the highlights of Alexander’s probate and discuss in more detail the heirs of his estate and what I know about each of them. I have already shared what I know about Alexander in this blog, so I won’t repeat his story.  Remember these individuals are also George A. Barclay’s siblings and half-siblings.  Did George communicate with his siblings and half-siblings? I have no knowledge of how close to them he was.  I do know about his relationship with Alexander.  Did Amarilla know them, I don’t know. Grace seemed to be aware of her aunts and uncles so maybe there was some communication.

Source: Probate File of Alexander Barclay, Dakota Co., Minnesota, December 1905. Petition for Letters of Administration, 11 January 1906, Submitted by Grace A. McDonald. 

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Well, I am back from my travels.  My second trip to Canada is completed and that happened in September 2014.  Remind me not to travel in the Fall because you have to drive through thick fog, rain, cold and wind storms, brrrr….  Fortunately, I did not have to deal with snow.  It was a great trip and I posted about it in The Man Who Lived Airplanes and the Boardman and Brown blog – see side panel for links.  I did 1964 miles just 49 short of my first trip. It was EPIC!

My week at Salt Lake City went by too quickly.  I enjoyed my class on Scottish research and learned a lot.  The British Institute sponsored by the International Society of British Genealogy and Family History always puts on quality genealogical education. http://www.isbgfh.org/ My teacher was Paul Milner and he was very knowledgeable and patient with us Americans.  You might want to check out his blog he discusses the sources and that could be very helpful.  http://www.milnergenealogy.com/

While in Salt Lake City I was at the Family History Library doing research I did try to seek out John Barclay and his first wife Margaret but was not successful in finding him listed in the indexes that they had, so it will probably require some more digging, fortunately, I have a road map with my class lessons.

Looking west in SLC

Looking west in SLC

Class on Irish Research

Class on Irish Research which I probably should take next?

Family History Library British Isles floor B2

Family History Library British Isles floor B2

Let’s see, I left off with Amarilla and J.G. Dawes in the 1905 Census in Pine River.  I will continue to follow Amarilla through the rest of her life touching on the people who were part of her experience which includes her half-siblings from the 2nd marriage of her father Daniel D. Spracklin: Lydia, Virda, Reed, Daniel, Peter, and Charles Edward. They are all characters just like Amarilla.  Yes, I will discuss her marriage to J.G. Dawes and later to George Urton.

Her “of the blood” siblings have been written about: Henry, Oliver, Mary and from the second marriage Alfred.  I will share some about Henry’s descendants especially Harry his first born.

There will be posts about the end of Daniel and Sarah’s lives and why it is so difficult to find them in the records in Iowa, it is because they left.  I had to go there to Iowa to find them.

There will be more about Amarilla’s grandchildren and daughter Grace.

How all these events and happenings affected Amarilla is difficult to say.  I really have very little personal information about her or memorabilia from her like a diary or letters.  Sigh!

On George’s side, I have some more interesting tidbits and will write about my research on his siblings and half-siblings. According to his brother Alexander’s probate file there were 11 children that were involved in the process, one of which was represented by his children.  Yes, it is a mystery.  So brother Alexander Barclay end of life will be a big topic.

There are two other blogs you should be consulting and that is the Solomon Goss of Fearing Twp. in Ohio where I share about Amarilla’s grandparents on both sides of her lineage.  Elizabeth Keller Spracklin’s parents,  John and Mary Keller, are discussed and this line leads to DAR and Mayflower.  On Daniel’s side I write about John and Lydia Spracklin and their lives in Ohio and will go back further into that lineage.  Lydia Goss Spracklin line also leads to DAR and Mayflower.

If you are interested in Amarilla’s daughter Grace’s life you could read about it in this blog and also in The Man Who Lived Airplanes.  That blog is about her son Keith’s life and the family.  Grace married Ronald S. McDonald in 1898 and had 8 children one of which was Keith, my father.  I will touch upon his siblings briefly in this blog, but for more details go to the Man Who Lived Airplanes.  My dad loved airplanes and worked around them all his life.

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Templegrds

2006 Temple Square SLC

Last year in October 2013, I took the Sources for Tracing Pre-mid-Nineteeth Cemetery Ancestors course offered by the British Institute in Salt Lake City, Utah, which is sponsored by the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History. http://www.isbgfh.org/

The course was excellent and one of my teachers appeared on an episode this last year of “Who Do You Think You Are?”  I was very excited when I saw Paul Blake on the show.  http://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are

I started to build on my Boardman and McMurray/Jackson family lines on my mother’s side and I posted my findings on the Boardman and Brown blog I write.  I also did some searching on the Spracklins.  Spracklin is Amarilla’s maiden name.  So I studied the records for Somerset, Dorset and more in England.  I will be sharing those findings on my other blog:  Solomon Goss of Fearing Twp. in future posts. See the right panel of this blog for the links to my other family history blogs.

Family History Library 2006

Family History Library 2006

This year in 2014, I will be attending the Institute again in Salt Lake City and taking Scottish Research: The Fundamentals and Beyond, by Paul Milner.  So I am currently in the process of preparing to attend this course and getting ready for the trip to Salt Lake City.  I also plan to take advantage of the opportunity to do more of the family research at the Family History Library.  It will be a very intense week of classes and researching.  So I will be getting back to posting on this blog some time in November 2014.  There is a lot of good information coming for future posts on the Barclays.

This course hopefully will help me to learn about Scottish genealogical research, figure out a strategy to “Finding the Greats.”  Hopefully I can find John Barclay and Margaret my great great grandparents in Scotland.  These are George A. Barclay’s parents, the subject of this blog.  I want to visit the British Isles at some point within the next two years so I am getting ready.

The Line at opening to the Family History Library

The Line at opening to the Family History Library

This will be my sixth trip to Salt Lake City and the Family History Library.  https://familysearch.org/locations/saltlakecity-library  This library and their online website for their records has contributed greatly to my research successes.  https://familysearch.org/search  I do know of people who go there even more than six times.

2009 3rd Floor Family History Library

2009 3rd Floor Family History Library

At the National Genealogical Society Conference held in Salt Lake City in 2010 Family Search announced that they would digitize their whole collection and it would take 100 years but they had created ways to improve digital transfer so they could do it in 10 years.  I was amazed.  Every time I go to their website it changes and gets better and better.

2013 British Institute

2013 British Institute getting ready…

I was thinking of sharing my Powerpoint lecture:  “Planning a Trip to the Family History Library,” on this blog but I created it five years ago and it is now very out-of-date, so you can see that Family History Library and their website have changed a lot.

2013 British Institute Class

2013 British Institute Class

Well it is time to get back to planning for this trip.  One of the requirements is to read a book on Scottish History, so I best go and get my two chapters in.

The History of Scotland,” by Peter & Fiona Somerset Fry, reprinted several times 1997.

 

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We must remember that back in 1898 in a local area like Pine River it was not easy to investigate a crime or a death.

The steps are very complicated in murder investigations today.

Here is a much more detailed explanation of a murder investigation, I am sure there are better websites to consult but it will do.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-involved-in-criminal-murder-investigations.htm

A familiar figure of the times!

A familiar figure of the times!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherlock_Holmes

So if we take and compare the murder of my great-grandfather George A. Barclay to the standards of today’s murder investigations we see that there are a lot of discrepancies. I confess that I am a big crime scene fan (CSI), but drama is not reality.  I am going to jump in and take some of the steps in the above link and share my thoughts below regarding George’s murder based on the documentation that I have found.  If only Sherlock Holmes could help?

1.  The murder is reported by someone who comes across the victim.  That person is asked to remain on site.  

In this murder case there are many people who witnessed the actual event and were nearby who heard the gunshot.

The news of the crime occurred when the railroad office was contacted requesting medical help for George Barclay.  This was described in the “Cold Blooded Murder,” article which I featured in my post dated November 28, 2013 titled:  Cold Blood Murder and Cowardly Crime, November 1898.   I will be referring to those two articles a great deal so you might want to go and read them.

“A telegram was immediately sent to General Manager Hear, of the B.& N. M. for a special train with  medical assistance, but before this could be procured a second message was received saying that he had passed away.”

2.  Verification of death of the victim by paramedics or coroner

Someone apparently knew how to determine if an individual had died.  It was not made apparent who that was in the records.  The nature of the wound and the number of witnesses was probably sufficient. Although each witness had their version of the actual death.  Some indicated that George died quickly and others said he lingered for up to 30 minutes.  The time of death was given as 7:10 pm and I have seen 7:30 pm given.  I have also seen the day mixed up.

I am going for this:  Time of death was given at 7:10 to 7:30 pm, October 29, 1898.

3. The scene is turned over to law enforcement. 

It is not clear that the scene was turned over to law enforcement.  A newspaper tidbit reported that:

On November 3, 1898 in the Cass County Pioneer  (Vol. 5, #42, p. 8, col.)

“B.F. Hartshorn and Geo. Hardy went to Pine River to look into the facts concerning the murder of Mr. Geo. Barclay.

B.F. Hartshorn was the Cass County Attorney and Public Prosecutor  (1897 to 1903 Cass County History).  Geo. Hardy was the sherif at the time (1897 to 1905 Cass County History).  Both of these men will be involved up till the trial.

3.  An officer is put in charge of the investigation

Again this is not made clear in the transcripts as to what law enforcement officer was conducting an investigation. Frank Breese, Deputy-Sheriff was at the Coroner’s inquest to give testimony regarding the bullet that killed George.

4.  The scene is secured to prevent contamination of the evidence.  

With all the witnesses and people coming and going that night at Barclay’s I doubt that the scene was secured at all.  As for contamination that happened immediately.  In the testimony at the Coroner’s Inquest several people were reported as touching the body.  I am sure in the confusion, chairs were moved around.

5.  The murder scene is observed and documents with photographs taken.

Photography was not like we have today with digital cameras and instant recording of events.  It is not clear to me who observed the crime scene.  I am assuming Mr. Sundberg the Justice of the Peace and Acting Coroner did a walk through along with the jury members, maybe Hartshorn and Hardy were there?

6.  Evidence is collected and bagged and sent to the crime lab. 

In the next post I  In a future post, I will review the evidence that was collected.  In this case we have the body as evidence and the area around it, the bullet, the post where it logged, the scene of the crime, the hole in the window and glass on the floor, the location from where the gun was fired, witness accounts and their guns, and more.

7.  The body is first removed and taken to the coroner’s office for autopsy.  

This was not done until the inquest was over and even then I do not see any evidence of an autopsy performed. George’s body remained where it had crumpled till the Coroner’s inquest was completed. A Mr. E. F. Lynch who resided at Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota was an undertaker for D.M. Clark & Co.  He was called upon to prepare the body of Mr. Barclay for burial.  He testifies in what appears to be the Grand Jury proceedings.

7.  People are interviewed who were involved with the murder or nearby when the murder occurred.  

There are many witnesses that gave testimony at the Coroner’s Inquest.  I cannot tell if anyone else did any interviewing of the witnesses other than at the Coroner’s Inquest.

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The Cass County Historical Society published a book in 2010 titled:

Murder and Mayhem, True Crime Accounts Cass County 1897-1938

The authors collected documentation from many sources and they feature right at the very beginning the George Barclay Murder in Pine River in 1898, pages 1 to 24.  There are many other names and cases discussed in this book.  A copy may be obtained from the Cass County Historical Society for about $25.00.   http://www.casscountymuseum.org/publications.html

In this book you will find a pretty good coverage of the sources that were generated regarding the murder of George Angus Barclay.  Since they probably had a space issue they were unable to publish all of the information so you have to keep in mind that it is not totally complete.  I have most of what they share in this publication and they have other items I do not have which add to the story.

At the beginning of the section on George Barclay there is in introduction taken from the book Logsleds to Snowmobiles: A Centennial History of Pine River, Minnesota (1873-1973), Pine River Centennial Committee, 1979.  I would like to caution you that there are mistakes in this introduction.  The purpose of this blog was to correct those errors.  They state he was killed in the lobby, well there seems to be other information stating it was the saloon area of the hotel. Since there is no floor plan available it is difficult to be clear. First, George was more likely born in Enfield, CT not New Jersey, although I have not yet proved it.  I have shared in past posts about George’s earlier years and the census places George and his siblings scattered in the Connecticut area around Enfield and Hartford. Alexander and a sister Mary, older siblings, state they were born in Hartford and Enfield respectively.  This sort of  places a damper on being born in Scotland.  His father John Barclay in his Naturalization papers says he came to the United States in 1833.  I have posted about this event. However, George and his brother Alexander did not enlist together in the Civil War.  George waited a full year before he enlisted.  Alexander was older by two years.  I have all of their Civil War Service Records and pensions and I have thoroughly shared them in this blog.  Again, George did not march with Sherman to the sea, his brother Alexander was the one who did. No where in George’s Civil War Service or Pension record which I have shared on this blog does it say that he was with Sherman.  However, Alexander’s Civil War documents do state this fact. I mapped out their company records so you can see from those maps that they were going in separate directions.  Now granted those company records may only cover the main events.  Individual soldiers could be sent where ever they were needed.  I have shared the article from the Northwest Magazine and the mention that George had 840 acres but I am not convinced.  I will tally it someday in the future and see if it matches.   Oh and on page 23 Amarilla married George Urton in 1922 and this is not correct she married him in 1919 but I will get to posting on their marriage later.

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Ellen Barclay’s will is under the name of Helen Barclay.

Last Will and Testament of Helen Barclay, pg. 428

I, Helen Barclay of Shakopee in the County of Scott and State of Minnesota being of sound mind and memory do make, publish and declare this to be my last Will and Testament.  First: I order and direct that my, Executor herein after, named pay all my just debts and funeral expenses as soon after my decease as conveniently may be. Second: After payments of such funeral expenses and debts, I give devise and bequeth unto my son William Barclay one dollar, to my daughter Anna Carter one dollar and to my daughter Mary Clark one dollar.  Third: After the payment of the above bequests, by my Executor, I give devise and bequeth all the rest and residue of my Estate personal and real to my son Charles Barclay to have and hold the same to himself his heirs and assigns forever. Fourth, I hereby constitute my son Charles Barclay to be Executor of this my last Will and testament, hereby revoking all former Wills by me made.  In testimony thereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal the 9th day of September in the year of our Lord 1905.  Helen X Barclay. 

This instrument was on the day of the date thereof signed, published and declared by the said testatrix to be her last Will and Testament in our presents, I do at her request, have subscribed our names thereto as Witnesses, in her presence and in the presence of each other. Jul J. Peace, Fred P. Berens. 

Will and Certificate of Probate Helen Barclay

Will and Certificate of Probate Helen Barclay

Source: Scott County, Probate Court, Final Decrees of Distribution page 4, Roll 1, Final Decrees with indexes, 1884-1968, 20 volumes, Order Book U, Oct. 1906 – Oct. 1911, pp. 265-601, Frame No. 511.

Certificate of Probate page 429

State of Minnesota, County of Scott ) ss.  In Probate Court

In the matter of the Estate of Helen Barclay deceased.  Be it remember, that on the day of the date hereof, at a Special Term of said Probate Court, pursuant to notice duly given the Last Will and Testament of Helen Barclay late of said County of Scott, deceased bearing date the 9th day of September 1905, and being the annexed written instrument, was duly proved before the Probate Court in and of the County of Scott aforesaid, and was duly allowed and admitted to probate by said Court according to law, as and for the Last Will and Testament of said Helen Barclay, deceased, which said Last Will and Testament is recorded and the examination taken thereof filed in the this office. 

In Testimony whereof, The Judge of the Probate Court of said County has hereunto set his hand an affixed the seal of the said Court at Shakopee in the said County, this 4th day of January 1908. 

A. Meyer, Judge of Probate

There was in the Probate Order Book pg. 257 a Final Decree of Distribution of the Estate. It was a form and I have summarized it here.

County of Scott, The Matter of the Estate of Helen Barclay

The above entitled matter came on to be heard on the second day of May 1908…The representative of said estate appeared in person and by Counsel and no adverse appearance or objection was made.  

First…hearing made and filed on 7th of April, 1908 and that said citation has been published as required by law in the Shakopee Tribune.  

Second, all debts, funeral, burial, last sickness have been fully paid…final account herein which has been settled and allowed by the Court and that all specific bequests have been fully paid and satisfied.  

Third – the said decedent died testate on the 30th day of November, 1907 and  was a resident of Shakopee, County of Scott, State of Minnesota.  Fourth:  residue of estate consists of the following property, to-wit,

(A) personal property of the value of $700.00 comprised of the following items, viz:

1.  One note and mortgage dated Feb 7, 1905 made by Thos. J. Shanlay to C. J. Sord, recorded Feb. 20, 1905 at 1:10 pm in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Powner County and State of North Dakota for $700.00 and assigned by said C. J. Sord to said Helen Barclay – Int. 6% due Dec. 1, 1909.

(B) Real property – none.  Those and other tracts or parcels – none.  

Fifth, That the following named person is the sole residuary legatee and is the only person entitled to the residue of said estate of said decedent by the terms of the last Will and Testament of said decedent, Charles Barclay son of said decedent. 

Signed by N. Meyer, Judge of said court, on third day of May, 1908. 

Source:  Final Decree of the Distribution of the Estate of Helen Barclay, State of Minnesota, Scott County, pg. 357, 3rd May, 1908, Scott County Historical Society.

As usual more questions arise when you read a will and the other documents associated with it.  Helen/Ellen’s will is very interesting in that several of the children only get $1.00, but we must remember that the land John and Helen/Ellen owned was slowly sold to Charles and William.  Perhaps the daughters received gifts before they left home an after their marriages.  Yes, there is much more to do on Helen/Ellen Barclay and her life. I will leave that to her descendants as I am of the 1st wife Margaret and what to spend my time trying to find out more about her.

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Ellen Barclay lived another 10 years after her husband John Barclay.  She died in 1907.

In this post I want to share what I know about Ellen, because I think it fits with John Barclay’s end of life.  They had been together 29-30 years and had 4 children.  The children were Charles, William, Mary E., Anna Elizabeth.  I will go into more detail on the lives of John Barclay’s children from both marriages, when I get to the death of Alexander Barclay who was a half-brother to Ellen’s children and full brother to the first seven, Margaret’s children.  Alexander left a very involved probate file when he died in 1906.  He was George Angus Barclay’s full brother and my great grandfather and subject of this blog.

Her name has been a frustration because documents have her as Helen or Ellen.  The writing was so bad you could not read it.  The tombstone has her name as Ellen so I will use that name.  In John Barclay’s obituary notice it was said that her maiden name was Iverson but in her own obituary it is listed as Stevenson.  It is possible she was married before John, but so far I do not see any evidence for a first marriage for Ellen.  It is also possible that the use of Iverson was a mistake.  I am choosing to go with Ellen Stevenson Barclay till I am sure.

There is so much more research to do on Ellen Stevenson Barclay. I wish I had the time.  Ellen is the second wife of John Barclay and I do not descend from her.  I descend from Margaret  and frankly I am more interested in finding the origins of John Barclay and his first wife Margaret.  So I present what I have learned about Ellen for those who would be interested.

In order to understand Ellen’s life you need to review some of the posts I have written about John Barclay.  She will be featured in census and other documents like deeds, etc.  You can find other posts by using the search box on the right of this blog.  You can also seek out the Categories on the right of this blog and under SURNAMES you will find “Barclay Surnames.”   From there scroll down and you will find John Barclay and Ellen/Helen Stevenson.  Unfortunately the names are alpha order rather than by the lineage.

So what happened to Ellen after John’s death?

In 1898, after John’s death, Ellen Barclay (widow) rents her land to her son Charles Barclay on 29 August 1898

$100 yearly for years during the life of the party of the first part to be paid on April first and Jany first of each year.  The NW atr of the NE qtr of Sec 23, Twp. 115, Range 22, according to the government survey thereof.  Also said party reserves the use of two rooms in the building on the above property, use of the present garden, also parture, barn, corn and feed for one cow, poultry 

Source:  Deed of Indenture Ellen Barclay to Charles Barclay, Aug 29, 1898, Vol. 47, pg. 287 #11684, FHL# 1255725, Scott County, Minnesota

On 13 February 1899 another son William Barclay sells his share of the land to his brother Charles.

For a sum of $1800.00, Wm. and wife Clara E. Barclay are residing in Mammoth, Madison Co., Montana sold to Charles Barclay residing in Eagle Creek, Scott Co., Montana to-wit, the south 1/2 of the NE qtr of Sec. 23, Twp. 115, Range 22, 80 acres according to gov. survey.  Except a certain mortgage payable to Henry Hinds of Shakopee. Witnessed by W.R. Macfadden and F. H. Wilbour and signed by William Barclay and Clara E. Barclay in the State of Montana, County of Madison etc.

Source:  Deed of Wm. Barclay and wife Clara E. to Charles Barclay, February 13, 1899, Vol. 47, pg. 33 #12062, Scott Co., Minnesota, FHL #1255727.

After John’s death in 1897, we find that the next census is the 1900 U.S. Federal Census.  In this census we learn that Ellen was living with her son Charles.  This census shows us that the only child that is still around is Charles. The remaining three children of John and Ellen have married and migrated elsewhere.  William and Mary E. went to Montana.  Anna married and went to Wisconsin to live.  Charles is a mystery.  After his mother’s death it is difficult to determine where he went.  There are possibilities for a Charles Barclay living in Minneapolis/St. Paul.

28/28 Barcley, Charlie, Head, Jan. 1860, 40 years old, single, born in Minnesota, Father born in Scotland, mother born in Norway, farmer, educated, land info.  Barcley, Ellen, mother born Apr 1833, 67 years widow, one child born, one child living, born in Norway and both parents where born in Norway. Naturalized 1858, 45 years in country (means she immigrated in 1855), educated.  Carter, John, Nephew born Feb. 1890 10 years, single.  Born in Wisconsin, Father born in Canada Fr., mother Minnesota, at school, 8 grade, educated.

Source:  Charlie Barclay & Mother, 1900 U.S. Federal Census,  Eagle Creek, Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota, FHL#1240788, Microfilm T623, Roll 788, page 142, SD ?, ED 172, Sheet #2.  I do not understand the number of children fro Ellen in this census.  All her children lived long lives?

Something happened in 1904 because a notice in the gossip column of the Scott County Argus was featured on May 20, 1904.  I have no idea what this means?

“Eagle Creek: Charles Barclay has moved his household furniture into Shakopee, and will make that his future home.  Charlie was always kind and obliging to everyone and we will all miss his happy smile very much.”

In 1906 he is still living in Shakopee per his half-brother Alexander Barclay’s probate case. This probate will be featured indepth at a later time on this blog.

Charles Barclay, aged 45 years, residing at Shakopee, Minn., who is a half-brother.

Ellen passes on 30 November 1907 in Shakopee.  She is buried with John in the Valley Cemetery in Shakopee. You see that they use the name Helen in the obituary notice but Ellen is on the tombstone.

Helen Barclay Death Notice Shakopee Tribune Dec. 13, 1907 pg. 4 col 3 Maiden: Stevenson also in the Argus on Dec 6, 1907 pg. 1 and col 4.

Helen's 2nd Obituary Notice

Helen’s 2nd Obituary Notice

Died – Barclay – At her home in this city, Saturday, November the 30th, Mrs. Helen Barclay of heart disease. Aged 73 years. Helen Stevenson was born in Norway in 1834, and came to this country in 1849(39?) settling in Wisconsin, then Iowa, finally coming to Minnesota in 1848. She moved to Shakopee in 1850 with her husband, John Barclay, and was one of the early pioneer settlers of Shakopee. Mrs. Barclay leaves four children to mourn her loss. They are: Mrs. Mary Clark of Montana, Mrs. Anna E. Carter of Marynette, Wis.; and Charles at home, and William Barklay of Montana. The funeral was held from the residence, Tuesday, at two o’clock in the afternoon, Rev. Mr. Ganschow officiating. We extend our sincere sympathy to the bereaved children.

2nd Obit – Scott Co. Argus – Friday, Dec. 6, 1907 – Died – Mrs. Helen Barclay, whose maiden name was Stevenson, died at her home in this city, Saturday, November 30th, 1907, of heart failure. Deceased had been in poor health for several months past, but not until two days prior to death did her condition give cause for alarm. Mrs. Barclay was a native of Norway, where she was born April 25, 1834. She came to America in 1849 and has resided in Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota. Her husband, John Barclay, and she were pioneer settlers in Scott county where the family is well-known. For several years past Mrs. Barclay has made her home in Shakopee with her son Charles, who survives her together with another son, William of Montana, and two married daughters. The funeral took place, Tuesday afternoon, at two o’clock, from the family residence, Rev. Carl Ganschow officiating, and interment was in the Valley Cemetery.

Helen's obituary notice Dec 1907.

Helen’s obituary notice Dec 1907.

The above information gives us some good information on Ellen/Helen Iverson/Stevenson.  Ellen left a probate file and will.  I will present that in the next post.

Note:  I was having a great deal of trouble researching the early years of the state of Minnesota and when it was a territory and was unable to find an actual marriage for John and Ellen in the records.  Minnesota went through a lot of changes before it became a state and was associated with records of a territorial nature of Michigan and Wisconsin.  The counties also changed their boundaries.   Here is a Wikipedia article that might help to get you started on researching in Minnesota http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Minnesota

The other problem is that not a lot of documents have been filmed by the Family History Library for some of the counties of Minnesota.  So access to the documents is onsite.  I have traveled to Minnesota three times and would love to go back for more research, we will see.

Me at the Minnesota Historical Society 2007, my third time there.

Me at the Minnesota Historical Society 2007, my third time there.

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John and Ellen Barclay are both buried in Valley Cemetery in Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota.  Finding Valley Cemetery was not an easy task for I did this back in 2007.

Here is a Google map that shows where the cemetery is located:

Location of Valley Cemetery

Location of Valley Cemetery

Find A Grave has a listing of Valley Cemetery about 82% photographed, along with a map of the location.   There is a picture of the tombstone of John and Ellen taken in 2010 and it is looking a little worse for wear.  My photos were taken in 2007.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=83757&CScn=Valley+&CScntry=4&CSst=25&CScnty=1379&

When my husband and I arrived at the cemetery in June of 2007, we went to the location given in the cemetery publication I had found.  I searched and searched but did not find the tombstone.  Luckily my husband is very good at finding things in cemeteries.  He found the stone in a different location.

We first looked at lot E 1/2 lot 94.  See the white arrow on the map below.  Instead, the tombstone was in the South end section 7 Row 16 near a Sam Woods, Ronald Brown etc.  It is closer to the cemetery shed and farther from the house on the left.   See the red arrow.

Google Earth Photo of Valley Cemetery in Minnesota

Google Earth Photo of Valley Cemetery in Minnesota

Go in at the entrance sign and go straight back past the shed.

Entering Valley Cemetery in Shakopee, MN

Entering Valley Cemetery in Shakopee, MN

Here is the tombstone that I saw in June of 2007.  It had lost its finial at the top but it was not leaning like the Find A Grave photo.

John & Ellen Barclay's Stone

John & Ellen Barclay’s Stone

Here are closer views of the inscription on the tombstone.

John Barclay and Ellen Barclay, Valley Cemetery

John Barclay and Ellen Barclay, Valley Cemetery

It reads:  John Barclay born Mar 18, 1801, Died Dec 25, 1897.  Ellen Barclay born April 25, 1831, Died Nov. 30, 1907.

The next photograph is closer to Ellen’s information.  The name of John’s second wife has been a lot of trouble.  Here it is written as Ellen, but her estate file has it as Helen, sigh!  We can go with the information on the tombstone or keep an open mind about other records that use Helen.

Ellen Barclay's information

Ellen Barclay’s information

I took this picture so that one could use the houses in the background to find the tombstone quickly.

Tombstone of John and Ellen Barclay

Tombstone of John and Ellen Barclay

Here is a picture of me next to the tombstone of my 2nd great-grandfather John Barclay.  Ellen was his second wife and I descend from the first whose name was Margaret.  Little is known about Margaret unfortunately.

Bonnie at the grave of her great grandfather John Barclay, Valley Cem, MN

Bonnie at the grave of her great-grandfather John Barclay, Valley Cemetery, MN

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