J.G. Dawes Builds Amarilla a House 1904!

Among my father, Keith’s possessions, was a postcard picture of a house with some writing on the backside.

Amarillia's House in 1911

Amarillia’s House in 1911

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The writing on the backside of the postcard reads:

“Dear Papa:  I hope you are well. We are all well. Will you please send me or bring me my Rubber Raincoat, Lovingly Vivian.  Addressed to M. R.S. McDonald International Falls, Minn.”

It was about this time in Pine River, in 1904, that J.G. Dawes had the house built.  Now I cannot verify that he was responsible for actively building the house but he seemed to think so years later when he commented about it in an affidavit for another attempt of Amarilla to secure George’s Civil War pension.

This house still stands in Pine River and is lovingly cared for by a local family.

 

Amarilla gives to the Methodist Episcopal Church

Amarilla and J.G. gave lots 21 and 22 in Block 12 to the Methodist Episcopal Church of Pine River for $1.00 in September of 1902.  Amarilla was to bequeath a lot more to the town of Pine River.

Mrs. Ammarrila Dawes & husband, to The Methodist Episcopal Church of Pine River, filed 10 October 1902 at 9 am. This indenture made this 11th day of September, 1902 between Mrs. Ammarilla Dawes & J.G. Dawes of the County of Cass and State of Minnesota parties of the first part and The Methodist Episcopal Church of Pine River of the County of Cass and State of Minnesota party of the 2nd part Witnesseth that the said parties of the first part in consideration of the sume of one dollar to them in hand paid by the parties of the 2nd part….Lots numbered twenty one (21) and twenty two (22) in Block twelve (12) in the Village of Pine River, according to the original plat on file with the Register of Deeds in and for said county and state….signed by Ammarilla Dawes and J.G. Dawes and witnessed by Hans P. Hanson and Wyman H. Davis the notary public witnessed their free act and deed.

Source:  Cass County Register of Deeds, Cass County Courthouse, Walker, Minnesota, Book W, pg. 407, 11 September, 1901.

Apparently, Amarilla and J.G., were involved in the founding of this church for there appears an Article of Incorporation which was filed for record September 23, 1902.  Although they are not listed as trustees it is evident that they assisted with the process by the giving of the lots of land to the church.

Article of Incorporation Methodist Episcopal Church

Article of Incorporation Methodist Episcopal Church

Know all men by these presents, that we, Robert Forbes, the presiding officer, and Samuel J. Parish, the Secretary, of a Quarterly Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which was duly called, held and conducted on Monday September 1, 1902, in the school house of Pine River, County of Cass, State of Minnesota, according to the discipline and usage of the Methodist Episcopal Church and statues in such case and provided, do hereby certify that at the said Quarterly Conference the following named persons to wit: Stephen Jarvis, Frank L. White, Cramer H. Mitchell, Manly T. White and Heber S. Gilbert were duly elected trustees of The Methodist Episcopal Church of Pine River in the County of Cass, State of Minnesota, a religious Corporation said corporation to be known as The Methodist Episcopal Church of Pine River which corporate name was then and there assumed by said Trustees.  Given under our hands and seals this 1st day of September, 1902.  In the Presence of George O. Parrish and S.P. Hanson.  Signed by Robert Forbes, President and Samuel L. Parish, Secretary. Signed by S. P. Hansen, Justice of the Peace Cass County, MN

The above was found in the clerk books after the deed for $1.00 mentioned above.

The instrument continues with an affidavit of the two men doing this of their own free act and deed followed with an affidavit certifying that Mrs. Amarilla Dawes was the same person as Mrs. G.A. Barclay, dated the 8th day of September 1902.

Grace Barclay McDonald Hears the News!

The death of her father must have been a great shock to my grandmother Grace.  She was only a little over 16 years old at the time of his murder.  I wonder what she might have been thinking.  I have wondered what the news of her father’s death would be like for her.  Things had been tense between them because of Hank Taylor’s interest and then her marriage to my grandfather R.S. McDonald.  George had not been happy and told her so.

Here is a possible scenario:

            R.S. entered the hotel room.  Grace was just finishing tucking her hair into place.  She turned to greet him and stopped short.  R.S. looked at her intently.  “What’s wrong?” she said.  Ronald Sandfield McDonald searched carefully for the words that would tell his lovely new wife of the tragedy that had occurred.  “Well, Mr. McDonald, what on earth is wrong.” She demanded.  R.S. could see no other way but to say the words.  “Your father has been shot.”  Grace looked at him and blinked standing there with a puzzled look at her face.  “Papa, shot? Is he all right?”  R.S. took a deep breath and said:  “No, I am afraid to tell you this, but he died very quickly and suffered little.”  Grace began to sway and R.S. rushed to catch her and gently helped her to the bed.  “This can’t be. Are you sure?”  Grace said.  “Yes, here is the telegram that came just now.”  He handed it to her.  Grace took it into her hands and read it slowly and carefully.  It was from her mother, Amarilla and it asked her to come home immediately.  She held it tightly in her hand and the room was filled with silence. R.S. sat next to her gently comforting her. The last several months since their marriage had been hard but this was totally unexpected and unbelievable. R.S. was the first to break the silence and said “I have made arrangements to get you to Pine River as quickly as possible.  He rose from the bed and went to her suitcase and started packing her things.  Grace sat quietly on the bed, reading the telegram again and again.  Clutching it in her hand.  “Papa, dead?”

            Grace and R.S. said their goodbyes at the Cloquet train station.  “I have some business to finish up and will be going off to the camp.  I will come down to Pine River in a couple of days and be with you.  I am so sorry, Grace.  I wish I could be with you now but Backus has me running.”  Grace smiled gently at her husband. His job as Superintendent for Backus was not an easy one.  Grasping the railing she climbed abroad the train. Feeling a tug at his heart, R.S. watched the train starting its journey.  Leaving her behind was always hard but this was worse.  He turned on his heels and dashed up the street.

            Grace somehow found a seat on the train next to the window.  The train began to pick up speed.  Can’t this train go faster, she thought.  Wanting to get home and find out what had really happened to her father and yet on the other hand a tremendous dread of what was to come engulfed her.  Papa, dead……no it can’t be.  He was just yelling at Yllander a few weeks ago.  Papa always yelled! …

Written by her granddaughter in 2005.  My grandmother had her written compilation “Words of Wasted Moment.” I hope I have done her proud to write this scenario.  See the posted dated September 19, 2013 “1898: Sweet Sixteen – Grace Barclay is growing up. “

How Grace managed to get from Cloquet, Minnesota to Pine River by November 2, 1898 for the Coroner’s Inquest on the death of her father George, is only speculation on my part.  I am convinced she used the railroads to do it. Getting around as a passenger in Minnesota had not been easy but progress was being made by 1898.  She either went to St. Paul and headed for Brainerd where she took the train to Pine River; however, if the railroad was in place from Duluth to Brainerd then she could have gone to Duluth from Cloquet and transferred to get into Brainerd and then headed north to Pine River. Fun to speculate on her route.

The Historical Maps website has a railroad map for Minnesota dated 1900.  Grace was no stranger to traveling the trains.  She had been riding them for years going to school in St. Paul and traveling with her parents.

http://alabamamaps.ua.edu/historicalmaps/us_states/minnesota/index2_1891-1900.htm

Pine River Gossip in 1897!

The organization of Cass County and the establishment of Walker as the county seat was taking place but at the same time George Barclay was also involved with business, local events, and family happenings.  I return to the gossip columns in the newspaper and learn that Grace and Amarilla were both mentioned as well.

January 2, 1897: “Mr. Barclay made a flying trip to Brainerd and returned with his wife and daughter.  The later came up to spend vacation.” Grace was sixteen years old at this time.

“Mr. Barclay is still buying ties and is very busy, but his health is not good, as he is lame in his left shoulder. “

January 2, 1897 George is on the move.

January 2, 1897 George is on the move.

Source:  Local News – Pine River, The Cass County Pioneer Newspaper, 1/2/1897 to 6/2/1898,  January 2, 1897

July 1: “Geo Barclay has been down to Minneapolis ever since the 14th of this month. He was down on a lawsuit, which is now over. He returned on the 28th.”

“Andrew Whitesides, Mrs. Mickleson, Phil Reeler, Billy Pickler and The Moose were all down to the city as witnesses for Mr. Barclay.  Miss Barclay was down also.  She returned last Monday.”

“Mrs. Barclay is not feeling very well, but she is still working.”

Mr. Barclay and party including his daughter stopped in Minneapolis about a week.  Miss Barclay took down a couple of her father’s witnesses.”

Source:  Local News-Pine River, July 1, 1897, Thurs, Cass County Pioneer Newspaper. 1/1/1897-6/2/1898.

July 15: “Mr. George Barclay was down to Brainerd Saturday last and reports the washouts as bad.”

Source:  Cass County Pioneer, Jan. 2, 1897 to Jan 2, 1898 – July 15, 1897 Front page, 3rd column at the top. 

Note:  I do not know what lawsuit the gossip column was referring to? I am a bit curious but have not had time to research it.  It would require looking at court documents and that could get tricky depending on which court it was in, state, federal or county? The fact that my grandmother Grace was involved is very intriguing.  If I was to speculate it might have had something to do with the railroad or his past partner?

1895 State Census – The Barclays

George, Amarilla and their daughter Grace are featured in the 1895 census for Minnesota.  The 1880 U.S. Federal Census was rather vague and the 1885 spelled names wrong so this 1895 census was the only one that showed them together as a family.  I have posted about George the census in past posts.

A portion of that 1895 Minnesota State Census for Pine River

A portion of that 1895 Minnesota State Census for Pine River

Here is the 1895 Minnesota census:

Line 13, Barclay Geo. A, age 51, born in Conn., occupation [Lumberman], 12, sold, no, no, no. Barclay, Ammarilla, 37 years born in Iowa. Barclay, Grace A., 13 years born in Minn. 

 Source:  Geo. Barclay Family, 1895 Minnesota State Census, Twp. 137 Range 29W, Cass Co., Minnesota, Schedule 13 pg. 1,  FHL #0565765.  

When I went to source this census, I had a bit of a fright because the actual page looks like Twp. 127 rather than Twp. 137.  I therefore went to Family Search and double checked the film number to make sure I was not wrong.  I am happy to report that I am now correct with both FHL and Ancestry.   When I first started doing genealogy I was not very good at sourcing so a lot of the older research needs updating.  I do remember looking at the film for this particular census and probably doing that research at the Minnesota Historical Society at that time using film.

George’s brother Alexander Barclay was living in Dakota County.  Let’s see what was happening with Alex

6th line down: Barklay, Alexander A. 52 years, Male, White, born Conn. 40 years in area, 4 years?, farmer, 12, sold, yes, yes, yes.

Below him is Giles, Fannie B. 73 years old, female, white, born Mass, housekeepr, 12, no, no, no.

Source:  1895 Minnesota State Census, page 3, Lakeville Twp., Dakota Co., Minnesota, P.O. Farmington.

His father John Barclay was still living in Scott County with his wife Ellen/Helen and son Charlie

Family #54:  Barclay, John, age 94, male, white, born in Scotland, Resident of state 45 years, 45 years in enumeration district, occupation none, mother and father both of foreign birth.  Barclay, Ellen, age 65, female, white, born in Norway, both parents of foreign birth.  Barclay Charlie, age 35, male, white, born in Minnesota.  In state and enumeration district 35 years, a farmer, employed 12 mos of the year.  Both parents of foreign birth.

Source: 1895 Minnesota State Census, Eagle Creek, Scott Co., Minnesota, pg. 2, schedule #5, enumerated on 10 June 1895, FHL#565810.

This will be the last census that George (died 1898), Alexander (died 1905)  and John Barclay (died 1897) all appear in.  Even though Alexander lives till 1905 I have not been able to find him in the 1900 census nor the Minnesota state census of 1905.

Pine River in 1885!

1885 Minnesota State Census

Pine River in 1885 was not very big!  According to the Minnesota State Census for 1885 there were 29 total whites with 19 males and 10 females. 

6th line down No. 22, Postoffice Brainerd, MN; G. [_] Barclay 45 years, white, born in Maine, parents were not of foreign birth “no”. Under G. Barclay was the name Annetta Barclay, age 38, born in Maine, parents not of foreign birth. Written between the above two persons -[Annetta Barclay] age 3, born in Minnesota.

Source:  1885 Minnesota State Census, FHL#565733, #377, pg. 22, Township 136, Cass County. 

I find this entry in this state census very frustrating.  I have so little on my grandmother Grace’s origins.  Perhaps Amarilla sounds like “Annetta.”  The only one that seems to be recognizable is George.  The next point is the reference to Maine as their origin? My focus has been on Connecticut for George and his siblings.  For Amarilla it has been Iowa.  This is the reason that it has been very difficult to figure out where George came from.  His age of 45 places the year of birth at 1840 which is four years earlier than I have from other sources.  

Some of the other surnames on the page with George are:  Woodward, [Kuro or Thuro], Ramport, Fairbanks, Asley, Hunsinger, Dusett, Browne, Morrison, Bannon, Sullivan, and Tallaque/Tallaquais/Gallaquois. (Very hard to read.)

The inhabitants of Pine River in 1885 came from Pennsylvania, Ohio, Minnesota, Maine?, Vermont, Canada, Wisconsin, and Germany.

Many sources state that Amarilla was the only white woman in the Pine River area for years.  According to this 1885 census there were other adult women living near her family:  Sarah Woodman was 34 and white, Ethel Kuro [50] and white, Matilda Ashley 23 and white,  Amanda Tallaqua [37] and white, the rest of the women were young girls.

Note:  Ancestry.com, The Minnesota Historical Society in St. Paul and the Family History Library all have the Minnesota Territorial and State Census.