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Archive for the ‘Amarilla Dawes’ Category

Grace was pregnant with Miriam at the time of her uncle Alexander’s death. Giving birth in January of 1906. She took action and petitioned the court for the administration of Alexander Barclay’s estate about January 11, 1906. Alexander did not have a will.

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Grace was unable to travel because she was pregnant with Miriam.  By the time the testimony was given below was presented she had given birth, so the court was delayed in getting started.  Grace sent Charles W. Stanton as her representative:

Charles W. Stanton called and being duly sworn says (about March 14, 1906)

“My name is Charles W. Stanton.  I am the Attorney-in-Fact for Grace A. McDonald, the same person who made the petition for letters of administration shown me in this matter.  The other instrument shown me is my Power of Attorney executed by Grace. A. McDonald.  She was unable to appear at this hearing on account of delicate health.  On or about February 1st Mrs. McDonald gave birth to a child and has not as yet, regained sufficient strength to warrant a journey from International Falls to Hastings.  The distance according to the present means of travel, being over 700 miles.

I am a resident of the Village of International Falls, Itasca County, Minnesota.  I am well acquainted with Grace A. McDonald, wife of Ronald S. McDonald.  She is also a resident of the Village of International Falls, Itasca County, Minnesota.  I have known her since about the year 1890.  I also became acquainted with George A. Barclay, the father of said Grace A. McDonald about the year 1890.  Grace is now about 25 or 26 years of age.  I was, at that time, visiting in the Pine River, Cass County, this State and have visited there since then many times, at the home of George A. Barclay and his family.  I know from my own knowledge of the family and from information received relative to said family that Grace A. McDonald was a daughter and the only child of George A. McDonald.

 George A. Barclay was shot at Pine River, Cass County, Minnesota some few years ago, and was survived by his wife and daughter, Grace A. Barclay, (who has since been married to said Ronald S. McDonald).  Mrs. Barclay, the widow of said George A. Barclay, has since inter-married with a certain man, and is now Mrs. Daws.  I never heard any mention of their being any other children in their family.  I have never seen any family record of their family, do not know that they kept any such record.  I do not know where Mrs. McDonald was born, although she may have told me. I do not recall now. 

 I know that said George A. Barclay is dead of my own personal knowledge and know that he was killed, as before stated.  He left some estate both real and personal.  I believe the personal property was divided amicably between his wife and daughter after his death.

 I did not know that there was such a person as Alexander A. Barclay prior to the death of George A. Barclay.  I have heard Mrs. McDonald speak of him since.  She also told me of the interest he took in the trial of the alleged murder of Mr. George A. Barclay.  She said the deceased assisted them financially many times during the lifetime of her father and has also assisted her mother since his death by loaning her money.  Mrs. McDonald visited Mr. Alexander A. Barclay, during his lifetime, while she was attending school in St. Paul or Minneapolis.  He (the deceased), visited them many times also, particularly during the trial and investigation of the murder of George A. Barclay.  Of my own personal knowledge, I do not know that the loans of Mr. Alexander Barclay to Mr. George A. Barclay were paid, or whether they were not, but have been informed by Mr. W. A. Gray of Farmington, Minnesota that they were paid in full.  Mr. Gray knew all about the affairs and business connections or transactions of Alexander A. Barclay, with the exception of some mining stock owed by the deceased.  Dr. Rogers of Farmington, knew and was well acquainted with the deceased prior to his death and knew all about the mining stock owned by the deceased at the time of his death, knows what companies they are invested in and also knows the amount invested by the deceased, which was, I believe $2300.00.  I made inquiries of both these men and think they can give and gave all of the necessary information relative to the estate of Alexander A. Barclay, deceased, that was in their possession. 

When I went to Farmington, which was on the 10th day of January, this year, I was not acquainted with anyone, but had a letter of introduction to Mr. George R. Taylor, who is Cashier in the Bank at Farmington.  He told me what he knew of the deceased’s financial and referred me to Mr. Gray and Dr. Rogers, from whom I obtained the information stated in the petition for letters that I made as attorney in fact for Grace A. McDonald, in this matter.  From information obtained from Mr. Gray by me, I believe the value of the personal property is about $2000. and consisted of  a mortgage of $1400; a chattel mortgage on a Blacksmith shop at Farmington, for $300 an another note executed by a party at Pine River for $100, on all of which there is probably some accumulated interest.  There was a check in the Bank of $50., some personal effects, etc., aggregating in all, about $2000.  The present value of the mining stock for investments, I know nothing about a personally, but was informed they are unlisted stock and in my opinion, not worth very much, perhaps about $1000.

I visited the real property owned by the deceased at Farmington, which consists of a house and lot, worth probably $800.00.  The Lakeville farm, I did not see, but it consists of 105 acres of agricultural land, and taking into consideration the answers to inquiries I made about it, it is worth between $4000. and $5000.  I know of no other real property owned by the deceased at the time of death.

George A. Barclay was engaged in Hotel business at Pine River, also the delivery and stable business at one time, but I have never heard anything about the deceased having any interest or partnership in any of the aforesaid business of said George A. Barclay, although he loaned him money at different times, according to Grace A. McDonald.

I know nothing about the other heirs of the deceased, although I have heard Mrs. McDonald speak of them perhaps.  I do not recall anything to the affect now.

The petition for letters asked for the appointment of Dr. H. N. Rogers, and we still desire this appointment.”

This testimony of Mr. Stanton is probably the best piece of information I could have found.  I now feel confident that my research on the Barclay’s is true and good. I wonder what other stories Mr. Stanton or the others may have had to share.  Sigh!

Apparently there were other reasons for delay and Dr. H.J. Rogers was not appointed administrator till about March 13, 1906. The bond was $5,000.

Dr. H.L. Rogers also was called to testify:

Dr. Rogers called, and being duly sworn, says: –

 “I reside at Farmington, Dakota County, Minnesota.  I knew and was well acquainted with Alexander A. Barclay, prior to his death.  I know the real property he owned at Lakeville and Farmington.  The property in Lakeville consisted of a farm of 105 acres of agricultural land and that at Farmington of house and lot.  I knew something of his financial affairs and his personal property to the best of my knowledge, consisted of something like $1800.  In notes, most of which are secured and $50. in certificate of deposit & $1000 shares of mining stock.  I know that Mr. Barclay paid for the mining stock and I am familiar with the kind of stock.  I would not attempt to place a value on this stock, as it is all unlisted stock but will give the Companies and the most of the stock of Mr. Barclay.

Dr. Rogers gives a detailed list of about 7 stocks and their total $2812.50

 In addition to the above the deceased had some “Shamrock” shares…I know of no other personal property belonging to the deceased, except two old trunks, containing cloths, which are of no particular value.  There may be papers of value in those trunks.  The farm implements and farm property owned by deceased, were disposed of sometime prior to his death.  The house and lot at Farmington is worth about $800.00.  His farm is valued at about $50 an acre.

My knowledge of the heirs of the deceased was obtained from him, and through correspondence with his heirs before and since his death.  I have no personal acquaintance with but two of the deceased heirs, viz: Charles Barclay at Shakopee, Minnesota, and Grace A. McDonald at International Falls, Minnesota.

Grace A. McDonald is the only child of George A. Barclay, who was killed a few years ago at Pine River, Minnesota, and who was a brother of Alexander A. Barclay’s.  I am not acquainted with the other heirs of the deceased named in the petition, but from what I have learned believe, that John A. Barclay named in the petition died prior to the death of the deceased, and that John A. Barclay left surviving him two children, who were his only heirs, viz: Sarah Ellen Sears and John Avery Barclay.  I believe John A. Barclay had no other children, except Sarah Ellen and John Avery.

 I know of the deceased death and arranged for his funeral at Farmington, and attended his funeral.  He died at Rochester, Minnesota, December 9th, 1905, at the State Hospital for the Insane.  At my request his remains were prepared for burial at Rochester, and shipped to Farmington, where he was buried.”

You never know what you will find in a probate file.  In this case, I had copies of the packet which I paid a high price for.  I did not have the court clerk books which might shed light on the process of the probate court.

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Well, I am back from my travels.  My second trip to Canada is completed and that happened in September 2014.  Remind me not to travel in the Fall because you have to drive through thick fog, rain, cold and wind storms, brrrr….  Fortunately, I did not have to deal with snow.  It was a great trip and I posted about it in The Man Who Lived Airplanes and the Boardman and Brown blog – see side panel for links.  I did 1964 miles just 49 short of my first trip. It was EPIC!

My week at Salt Lake City went by too quickly.  I enjoyed my class on Scottish research and learned a lot.  The British Institute sponsored by the International Society of British Genealogy and Family History always puts on quality genealogical education. http://www.isbgfh.org/ My teacher was Paul Milner and he was very knowledgeable and patient with us Americans.  You might want to check out his blog he discusses the sources and that could be very helpful.  http://www.milnergenealogy.com/

While in Salt Lake City I was at the Family History Library doing research I did try to seek out John Barclay and his first wife Margaret but was not successful in finding him listed in the indexes that they had, so it will probably require some more digging, fortunately, I have a road map with my class lessons.

Looking west in SLC

Looking west in SLC

Class on Irish Research

Class on Irish Research which I probably should take next?

Family History Library British Isles floor B2

Family History Library British Isles floor B2

Let’s see, I left off with Amarilla and J.G. Dawes in the 1905 Census in Pine River.  I will continue to follow Amarilla through the rest of her life touching on the people who were part of her experience which includes her half-siblings from the 2nd marriage of her father Daniel D. Spracklin: Lydia, Virda, Reed, Daniel, Peter, and Charles Edward. They are all characters just like Amarilla.  Yes, I will discuss her marriage to J.G. Dawes and later to George Urton.

Her “of the blood” siblings have been written about: Henry, Oliver, Mary and from the second marriage Alfred.  I will share some about Henry’s descendants especially Harry his first born.

There will be posts about the end of Daniel and Sarah’s lives and why it is so difficult to find them in the records in Iowa, it is because they left.  I had to go there to Iowa to find them.

There will be more about Amarilla’s grandchildren and daughter Grace.

How all these events and happenings affected Amarilla is difficult to say.  I really have very little personal information about her or memorabilia from her like a diary or letters.  Sigh!

On George’s side, I have some more interesting tidbits and will write about my research on his siblings and half-siblings. According to his brother Alexander’s probate file there were 11 children that were involved in the process, one of which was represented by his children.  Yes, it is a mystery.  So brother Alexander Barclay end of life will be a big topic.

There are two other blogs you should be consulting and that is the Solomon Goss of Fearing Twp. in Ohio where I share about Amarilla’s grandparents on both sides of her lineage.  Elizabeth Keller Spracklin’s parents,  John and Mary Keller, are discussed and this line leads to DAR and Mayflower.  On Daniel’s side I write about John and Lydia Spracklin and their lives in Ohio and will go back further into that lineage.  Lydia Goss Spracklin line also leads to DAR and Mayflower.

If you are interested in Amarilla’s daughter Grace’s life you could read about it in this blog and also in The Man Who Lived Airplanes.  That blog is about her son Keith’s life and the family.  Grace married Ronald S. McDonald in 1898 and had 8 children one of which was Keith, my father.  I will touch upon his siblings briefly in this blog, but for more details go to the Man Who Lived Airplanes.  My dad loved airplanes and worked around them all his life.

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Pine River was changing and growing up, so to speak.  The 1905 Minnesota State Census for Pine River includes both Jefferson G. Dawes and Amarilla on lines 11 and 12.  They are on page 1 of this census for the Village of Pine River.  They are enumerated after the Wideman family and after them come the Tardies, Phillip and Anna.  Mr. Tardy is listed for his occupation Saloon.  Amarilla and J.G. are listed as “retired.”  The Wideman’s are merchants.

1905 Minnesota State Census, Pine River, Twp. of Waldon, ED 9, County of Cass, State of Minnesota, enumerated on June 1 and 2, 1905, by Daniel Kline.

1905MinnJ&ADawes

 

A piece of good news:

The Pine River Journal with a date span of 1935 to 1946 is on display at the Minnesota Digital Library,

Minnesota Reflections http://reflections.mndigital.org/cdm/

This is much later than my time period at the moment but still good news.  You might want to check out their website.  When I was researching I used the actual newspapers at the Pine River Journal office in Pine River, and the Minnesota Historical Society newspaper collection in St. Paul.  I noticed that some of the Pine River newspapers were not microfilmed and in the MHS collection so I am glad to see this run of the Pine River Journal online.

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Pine River News

Besides their interests in Longville about this time, life pretty much went on in Pine River. I am always fascinated with their movements and comings and goings.

1.  Mrs. Dawes opens a millinery store and visits her daughter in Grand Rapids, 22 April 1904.

2.  Mrs. Dawes stepped on a nail, September 1904.

3.  Mrs. Dawes and Mrs. McDonald went to Brainerd with the children, September 1904.

4. J.G. Dawes went to the Twin Cities and returned, Nov. 1904.

5. Masked ball at the Barclay Hall, masks are on sale at the Post Office, Dec. 1904.

Anyone for dancing….!!!

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Around 1904 or 1905 J.G. Dawes decided to expand his business interests and headed to the Longville, Minnesota area.

Hotel Dawes, Longville 1905

The book “The History of Longville, MN 1906-2006″ shares this information about J.G. Dawes and Amarilla’s involvement in the growth of Longville.

“The hustling new town was laid out on the banks of Girl Lake by J.G. Dawes of Pine River in 1904.  In the fall, he had the hotel and store building constructed by George Oleson and A.D. Fuller. He rented the hotel to Tom Nash and Frank Wetherell…In May of 1905, Wideman and Company rented Mayor Dawes new building at Longville and opened a general store.” page 17. 

On Dec. 22, 1905 a copy of the town of Longville’s first council meeting minutes was published in the Pine River Sentinel, Dec. 22, 1905.  “Mr. Dawes, in his remarks, said he could hardly realize that it was scarce three years since he purchased the property on which the village stands and which, at this time, contained only one small log hut.” page 18.

Mr. Dawes stated that he had given and option on his town site at Longville (Dec. 3, 1909). page 20. 

In July 1916, the big general store occupied by Bert Fuller was totally destroyed by fire, together with contents…This big store building was erected by J.G. Dawes in 1905.  The building was a total loss. page 20. 

J.G. Dawes received promises of an appropriation to build a road from Mule Lake to Longville, this making a completion of the mail route between Pine River and Longville. Also an appropriation for the extension of the road from Longville to Thunder Lake, bridging the narrows of Inguadona Lake. He also secured an appropriation to comment work on the road between Pine River and Pillager, with the understanding that whatever amounts were paid out from time to time, it would be divided equally at each end of the road, until it was completed…. From the Pine River Sentinel Feb. 17, 1905), page 24.

Postal service to the community of Longville was instigated in 1904 by James A. Long. Jefferson G. Dawes was confirmed as Longville’s first postmaster on April 11, 1904 [to about October 5, 1905], page 173.

J.D. Dawes hired Albert Daniel Fuller, James Bert Fuller, and George Oleson to build the Hotel Dawes in 1904 on Lots 19, 20 and 21 in Block 5.  It was a two-story building with a large kitchen and dining room and eight sleeping rooms upstairs, page 213.  It looks like about 1908 Dawes must have sold the hotel. 

The land for the Longville School was purchased from Amarilla and J.G. Dawes for $1.00 in September 1905. , pg. 387.”

Apparently J.G. saw opportunity in the Longville area and built his hotel which required postal service but I think by about 1908 he had moved on.  When I did my research I was concentrating on Amarilla and George’s land transactions, it might be interesting to see how many deeds J.G. was involved with.

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Among my father, Keith’s possessions, was a postcard picture of a house with some writing on the backside.

Amarillia's House in 1911

Amarillia’s House in 1911

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The writing on the backside of the postcard reads:

“Dear Papa:  I hope you are well. We are all well. Will you please send me or bring me my Rubber Raincoat, Lovingly Vivian.  Addressed to M. R.S. McDonald International Falls, Minn.”

It was about this time in Pine River, in 1904, that J.G. Dawes had the house built.  Now I cannot verify that he was responsible for actively building the house but he seemed to think so years later when he commented about it in an affidavit for another attempt of Amarilla to secure George’s Civil War pension.

This house still stands in Pine River and is lovingly cared for by a local family.

 

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He was formally named Ronald Gordon McDonald which gets him confused with his father Ronald Sandfield McDonald. He was known as Gordon and affectionately as “Uncle Gordy.” Grace gave birth on 3 May 1904. The place of Gordon’s birth has been stated as Grand Rapids, Minnesota but I am not totally convinced.

You will find more information and pictures about the life of Gordon McDonald at my other blog “The Man Who Lived Airplanes,” here is one particular post about him: 

http://macdonellfamily.wordpress.com/2010/07/09/brother-gordy/

In the search box of the other blog mentioned above try, searching on “Gordon,” or “Ronald Gordon.”  We will meet up again with Gordon when he comes to visit his grandmother Amarilla in 1939.

Gordon as a little baby

Gordon as a little baby

This photo below is one of my favorites of my uncle.  It was taken in International Falls probably about 1909 or 1910?

GordonBakerSchlInt'lFalls

 

 

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