Amarilla’s Final Resting Place…Evergreen Cemetery, Brainerd, MN

In 2000 and 2001, I visited Brainerd on my trips to Minnesota.  I was stunned to learn that there was no tombstone for my great-grandmother Amarilla. She was buried in the plot with George Angus Barclay, their son George Alexander Barclay, and the first baby of daughter Grace and husband R.S. McDonald.

The large tombstone, in the photo below, that I am standing by is for George Barclay. To the front left is the smaller Civil War foot stone.  The tombstone to the right is for little baby George Alexander.  It has the lamb on the top. There was no stone for Amarilla. I checked with the Evergreen Cemetery Office, who are very helpful, to confirm that she was buried there. They have a diary of the dead at their website: http://www.brainerd.net/~evergreencem/dotd.html

Barclay Plot Evergreen Cemetery 2000.

Barclay Plot Evergreen Cemetery 2000.

I set about getting a tombstone for my great-grandmother and by the next visit in 2001 it was in place. Nothing fancy just a stone that gave her information. Her tombstone is in the forefront of the picture below. Much better, only problem is it reads as her birth year 1859, it should be 1858.  Darn!  I don’t understand how that happened but apparently it is not unusual for mistakes to be made on tombstones.  Sigh!  I do have my records and the paperwork asking me to check the information.  The form says 1859, but I did not make note of any changes so I could not go back and complain to the company who did the stone.  So my advice, if you create a stone for an ancestor keep careful notes.  It is not easy to do it from afar.

In the following picture you can see the new tombstone in the foreground.

George's, baby George and Amarilla 2001

George’s, baby George and Amarilla 2001

 

Amarilla should be 1858 for her birth year. Well it is only two months off.

Amarilla should read 1858 for her birth year. Well it is only two months off. Sigh!

 

Amarilla's new tombstone and her great granddaugher 2001

Amarilla’s new tombstone and her great granddaugher 2001

We visited again in 2007 before heading up to Pine River.  At least great grandma has recognition now.

Find A Grave has memorials to the Barclay’s with information, links, tombstones and more. The people who had created the memorials where kind to transfer the management to me and in some cases added new information. The memorials continue to evolve as I add links and information.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=67276024

One last and final try for George Barclay’s Civil War Pension – 1939

Money for Amarilla must have been tight, she was having trouble paying her taxes on her land. Based on gossip from the local paper both her and George Urton did not seem to be in good health. Amarilla apparently suffered a slight heart attack in 1936 and in the same article George was not doing to well either.  In 1937 Amarilla got into trouble with some wood.

Meets with Unfortunate Accident New Years:  Mrs. George Urton had the misfortune of having a pile of wood fall on her on New Years Day. While in the basement gathering wood before building a fire, a stack of wood which had been piled to the ceiling fell on her, seriously cutting the back of her head and blacking her eye. A physician was called immediately to dress her wounds. She is recovering nicely.  Pine River Journal January 7, 1937.

Gordon MacDonald, grandson of Mrs. Urton, arrived Saturday from St. Paul, to be with Msr. Urton who suffered a stroke last week and is still quite ill. He returned to St. Paul, Monday. Mrs. Urton is being cared for by Mrs. Frank Shepard.  Pine River Journal 21, April, 1939.

She tried again for George Barclay’s Civil War pension and this time her grandson Gordon McDonald tried to help her. I actually think her friends rallied and made the attempt to get this pension for her.

Remarried Pension form for Civil War 1939 a portion

Remarried Pension form for Civil War 1939 a portion

She had to fill out a Declaration for Remarried Widow’s Pension form again. The form was completed on 17 April, 1939.  She was required to restate information about her marriage in 1878 to George Barclay, and write about her marriage to Jefferson S. Dawes in 1902 and their divorce in 1909.  Lastly, she had to revisited her marriage to George Urton in 1919 and who died March 13, 1939 in Pine River. The form was signed by Ammarilla Urton and witnesses were Mrs. Frank Sheppard of Pine River and R.G. McDonald (Gordon) 1809 Marshall Ave. St. Paul, Min.  She must have been very sick because she signed with an X.

A letter on State of Minnesota Adjutant General’s Office letterhead for St. Paul dated April 19, 1939 was sent to E. L. Bailey the Director, Dependant’s Claims Service, Veterans Administration, Washington D.C.

Dear Sir: Herewith enclosed “Power of Attorney” given this office by Ammarilla Urton, Pine River, Minnesota, claimant in the above entitled claim fro Civil War widow’s pension.

Mrs. Urton is eighty years of age and very sick and if her claim can be expedited in any way it will help her to take care of expenses. Also enclosed the following additional evidence 1) application for Remarried Civil War widow’s pension, 2) Coroner’s Inquest in the death of George Barclay 3) certified copy of public record of the marriage of Ammarilla Urton to the veteran, George A. Barclay July 27, 1878. Very truly yours E.A. Walsh, The Adjutant General. 

They did not waste any time and Amarilla’s claim was denied the reason given:  “forfeiture under act of August 7. 1882.”

I spent some time trying to find a copy of this Legal act that they refer to and here it is.

7 August 1882 c. 438 22 Stat. 345

CHAP. 438.- An act to amend section forty-seven hundred and two, title fifty-seven, Revised Statutes of the United States, and for other purposes.Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That section forty-seven hundred and two, title fifty-seven, of the Revised Statutes of the United States is hereby amended so as to read as follows:

“Sec. 4702. If any person embraced within the provisions of sections forty-six hundred and ninety-two and forty-six hundred and ninety-three has died since the fourth day of March, eighteen hundred and sixty-one, or hereafter dies, by reason of any wound, injury, or disease which under the conditions and limitations of such sections would have entitled him to an invalid pension had he been disabled, his widow or if there be no widow, or in case of her death without payment to her of any part of the pension hereinafter mentioned, his child or children under sixteen years of age, shall be entitled to receive the same pension as the husband or father would have been entitled to had he been totally disabled, to commence from the death of the husband or father, to continue to the widow during her widowhood, and to his child or children until they severally attain the age of sixteen years, and no longer; and if the widow remarry, the child or children shall be entitled from the date of remarriage, except when such widow has continued to draw the pension-money after her remarriage, in contravention of law, and such child or children have resided with and been supported by her, their pension will commence at the date to which the widow was last paid.”

SEC. 2. That marriages, except such as are mentioned in section forty-seven hundred and five of the Revised Statutes shall be proven in pension cases to be legal marriages according to the law of the place where the parties resided at the time of marriage or at the time when the right to pension accrued; and the open and notorious adulterous cohabitation of a widow who is a pensioner shall operate to terminate her pension from the commencement of such cohabitation.

APPROVED, August 7, 1882.

It is the Sec. 2 part that was the reason they denied Amarilla the pension.  The Claims Service signed the denial on May 5, 1939. Mrs. Bertha Robideau and Mrs. Alice Leef gave their affidavits but apparently that didn’t help. Amarilla was told she could repeal the decision after a year.

George A. Barclay’s Civil War pension would not be awarded ever; however, the file would become very thick and has provided a great deal of information about George and Amarilla my great grandparents so I am happy. I am sad for her however.

The Death of Harry Spracklin, son of Henry Spracklin 1927.

The year 1927 would be a sad year for Amarilla because she lost several of her 1/2 siblings and a nephew. Daniel Goss Spracklin passed in August 1927 and Virda Huston Spracklin passed in November 1927.

On the 8th of August, 1927 Harry Spracklin, a nephew of Amarilla’s, died after being sick three weeks. He left a widow and seven children behind.

Spracklin
Harry LeRoy Spracklin, 51, passed away at his home, 731 1/2 West Second street, at 5:30 a.m. today following an illness of three weeks duration. The deceased was born January 4, 1876, at Sigourney, Iowa. He moved to Davenport with his parents when a small boy and has since resided here. Mr. Spracklin was a Spanish-American war veteran, and served in Cuba. He is survived by his wife, Frieda Spracklin; three sons, Le Roy, George and Harold, four daughters, Mrs. Dorothy Sievert, Bertha, Florence and Alice, all of Davenport; two sisters and five brothers. The body was taken to the Stapleton Funeral Parlors, from where services will be held Wednesday morning at 8:15 o’clock, with services at 3:30 at St. Anthony’s church. Interment will be made in Fairmont cemetery. 

It is not clear if Amarilla kept track of her older full brother Henry’s family.  Henry had died in 1893 from a tragic accident? I have featured Henry Spracklin’s story on this blog.  You can find him at the top of this blog on the PAGE devoted to his father Daniel D. Spracklin’s life. There you will find a listing of the posts published about Henry and his life.

Harry Leroy Spracklin was Henry and Elizabeth’s oldest child. He was born 1 June, 1876 in Sigourney, Keokuk, Iowa. Harry is buried in the Fairmount Cemetery in Davenport, Scott Co., Iowa. The grave is unmarked just like his father’s.

Newspaper: The Davenport Democrat and Leader
Date: August 24, 1927
Page 17

Headline: The Spracklin Funeral

Article Excerpt:

The funeral of Harry LeRoy Spracklin was held this morning at 8:15 o’clock from the Stapleton funeral parlors with services at 8:30 at St. Anthony’s church. The Rev. J.J. Hopkins celebrated requiem high mass, pronounced the burial absolution, preached the sermon, and conducted the committal services at the grave in Fairmount cemetery.

The casket bearers were H. Sterling. W.A. Dohoney, H. Relider, Albert Steinecke, D. Pars, and D. Sievert.

We go back in time and take a look at the life of Harry L. Spracklin:

After the death of his father Henry in 1893, we find that Harry was living with his mother Elizabeth in Davenport, Scott Co., Iowa. He continued to reside in Davenport till about 1897 per city directories of the time.

Spracklin, Elisabeth, age 41, Widow, Born in Pennsylvania, Keep House, Catholic
— Harry, age 17, Single, born in Scott Co., Cigar Maker, Catholic
–Maggie, age 16, Single, born in Scott Co., Catholic
–Flora, age 12, Single, born in Scott Co., Catholic
–Bessie, age 8, Single, born in Scott Co., Catholic
–Elmer, age 6, Single, born in Scott Co., Catholic
–Raymond, age 4, born in Scott Co., Catholic
–Elroy, age 2, born in Scott Co., Catholic

Source: Elisabeth Spracklin Family, 1895 Iowa State Census, Davenport Twp., Scott Co., Iowa, Microfilm #99, 4th Ward in Davenport, Line 23, Dwelling 6, House 6, State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, IA.

Taking a look at the above information.  Several of the children are not listed:  Edward Oliver Spracklin born 1877, John Daniel Spracklin born 1884, Wilbur Spracklin born 1885.  Sophia died young.  This makes eleven children for Henry and Elizabeth Spracklin.

In 1900 Harry appears in the U.S. Army Register of Enlistments 1798 to 1914. He was no. 171 and he enlisted in Cuba.

Harry L. Spracklin, Enlisted 28 Matanzas Cuba, Lt/Bt, period 8 years, born Sigourney, Iowa, 26, eyes brown, hair, a, color, complexion fair, height 5 ft. 6 inch. 2 Cavalry, [H] 2 G 8 Cav, Date of discharge, 10.9,99, Discharged Feb 13, 08 at Fort Myer, VA, End of Ser, Cook, Good, [Ret etc.] page 62. 

The 1900 Military and Naval Population Census has Harry in Cuba at the Hamilton Barricks, Company F, Regiment [Sand], Cavalry, Sht #3, enumerated 6 June, 1900, [Ina S, Winna 18th & Sq. etc. Company F, Regiment [Sand], Cavalry, Sht #3.

Harry married Frieda H. Ackerman on 28 March, 1907 in Davenport.

Groom: Harry L. Spracklin
Residence: Davenport, IA
Occupation: Cigar marker
Age at next birthday: 30, Color: White, Race: Cauc
No. of Groom’s marriage: First
Place of birth: Sigourney, Iowa
Father’s Name: Henry Spracklin
Mother’s Maiden Name: Elisabeth [nee] Downey
Full name of the Bride: Frieda H. Ackermann
Place of Residence: Davenport, Iowa
Age at next Birthday: 20, Color: White, Race: Cauc.
No. of Bride’s first marriage: First
Place of Birth: Davenport, Iowa
Father’s name: Hercuam Jacob Ackermann
Mother’s Maiden Name: Anna [nee] Waller
Married at Davenport in the County of Scott, State of Iowa
March 28, 1907
Witnesses were [ ] Sophy Mec and Wm. Ackermann

Source: Spracklin & Ackermann Marriage, March 28, 1907 Davenport, Scott Co., Iowa, Iowa, Clerk of the District Court, Iowa State Board of Health, State Historical Society, Iowa City, IA.

We find Harry and Frieda living in Davenport, Iowa in the 1910 census:

Line 89, 607, 124, 188, Spracklin, Harry, Head, M, W, 33, M1, 3, born Iowa, father born England, Mother born PA, English, Cigar Maker, Shop, W, No, 0, yes, yes, R, H

Spracklin, Freda, wife, F, W, 22, M1, 3, 1 child alive, one living, born Iowa, father parents born Germany, English, none.

Spracklin, Dorothy, born Iowa, parents born Iowa.

Huppendorf, Fritz, Lodger, born Germany, parents born Germany, 1870, NA, English, Mason, House.

Rear March, Joe, Lodger, born Germany, parents born Germany, 1885, NA, English, Laborer, odd jobs.

Source: Harry Spracklin Family, Davenport, Iowa, SD#2, ED#134, Sht#7B, Ward part of 3, enumerated 19 April 1910, Henry Huss.

In the Iowa State Census for 1915 they are still in Davenport, Iowa

B866 – Harry Spracklin – Sex Male, Color White, Married, can read and write, age 38, P.O. 920 Vine, Ward 3 of Davenport, Cigar Maker, earnings $720, 8th grade, birth Iowa, Military Spanish, church Catholic, father born Iowa, mother Penn., 38 years in US, signed by Hy Huse

B868 Dorothy Spracklin age 6, Scott Co., 920 Vine – all the children at this address see below. Lutheran, parents born in Iowa, female, white, can’t read and write, years in US 6.

B867, Frieda Spracklin, age 27, 9th grade, born Iowa, church Lutheran, father and mother born in Germany, Female, White, can read and write, years in US 27.

B871, White, single, 5 years in US and Iowa, George Spracklin, age 5m, born Iowa, father and mother born Iowa, Male, White, Single, 5 mos in US.

B890 white, single, 2 years in US and Iowa, Herbert Spracklin, age 2, born in Iowa, Lutheran, father and mother born in Iowa, white, single, male, years in US 2.

B869 Leroy Spracklin, age 3, born in Iowa, Lutheran, father and mother born in Iowa, male, white, single, in us 2 years.

Source: Harry Spracklin, 1915 Iowa State Census, Davenport, Scott Co., Iowa, Cards #B866, B868, B867, B871, B890 and B869. 

On August 21, 1919 Harry L. Spracklin was issued a land Patent #039057 in Miles City, Montana: North half of Section eleven in Township eighteen north of Range thirty-vie east of the Montana Meridian, Montana, containing three hundred twenty acres. In Testimony Woodrow Wilson, Authority May 20, 1862 Homestead Entry, in Garfield Co., MT.  What happened to this land I do not know and would probably have to consult the courthouse in Miles City or the Scott County Registrar of Deeds to see what turns up.

Harry and Frieda Spracklin’s family is growing as shown in the 1920 census:

Line 36, 1509, Dwelling 33, House 36 – lines 30 to 43, Spracklin, Harry, Head 42 yrs. married, read and write, born in Iowa, parents born in Iowa. Occupation: cigarmaker.
Frieda, wife, 22 yrs., married, read and write. Born in Iowa, parents born in Germany.
Dorothy, daughter, 10 yrs. old, school, read and write, born in Iowa.
Leroy, son, 8 yrs., school, read and write, born in Iowa
Herbert, son 7 yrs, school, read and write, born in Iowa
George, son, 5 yrs. old, not in school, born in Iowa
Bertha, daughter 3 yrs. old, not in school, born in Iowa
Florence, daughter, 1 2/12, not in school, born in Montana?

Source: Harry Spracklin Family, 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Davenport, Scott Co., Iowa, SD#2, ED#150, Ward 2 (part of), Sht# 2A, enumerated 2 January, 1920 by James M. Cunningham.

Things started to get a little rough for Harry and Frieda in the 1920’s. There son Herbert was killed in a tragic accident.

Coroner’s Jury to Investigate Spracklin Case
A coroner’s jury will investigate the case of Herbert Spracklin, age 6, living at 1509 West Sixth street who was crushed to death under the wheels of a Vander Veer park car last Sunday at West Second street and Western avenue. The inquest will be held at 7 o’clock tonight.

Source: “Coroner’s Jury to Investigate Spracklin Case,” Davenport Democrat & Leader, Feb 12/13, 1920, State Historical Society of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.

Herbert's death

Herbert’s death

Their daughters Bertha and Florence were involved in a rape case, where they were part of a group of kids attacked by a man. A series of articles appeared in the Davenport Democrat and Leader newspaper in 1923 about this case.

Think Many Children Fell into Snare of Man Held by Police, Date: October 21, 1923
Page 15

Attacker of Little Girls to be Tried, December 22, 1923.

Farrell Bound Over on $5,000 Bond By Wells, October 24, 1923 Man Charged with Alleged Assault on 7-Year-Old Girl Asks $2,500 Bond, Page 14.

Headline: Mother Threatens to Kill Witness if Jury Finds her Boy Guilty Date: December 16, 1923, Page 15.

Farnell Found Guilty, Faces Life Sentence Jury Convicts Man Accused of Attacking 7-Year-Old Girl. December 16, 1923.

While the little girls were struggling with the court case, their father got into trouble with drunken driving. Harry was part of: Five Drunk Drivers Arranged in Court; Three Held for Jury, July 2, 1923, page 14.

In 1925 Harry and Frieda’s family appears in the Iowa State Census which has a great deal of information contained on this census.

119-128, 324, Spracklin, Harry L., head, M, W, 48, M, R, 20, 1, 8, yes, yes, born Iowa, father Henry Spracklin, born Ohio, mother Downey, Elizabeth, born Penna, 75, Iowa, marriage Iowa, yes, Army, No, yes, yes, Catholic.

Spracklin, Frieda H., wife, F, W, 37, M, 2, 2, yes, yes, born Iowa, father Ackermann, Herman, Germany 77, Waller, Anna, Germany, 76, married Germany, Catholic.

Spracklin, Dorothy E., daughter, F, W, 16, S, grade 9, 9 mos, yes, yes, born Iowa, farther Harry L. Spracklin, born in Iowa, 48, mother Ackerman, Frieda H, born Iowa, 37, marriage Iowa, Lutheran all children.

Spracklin, LeRoy H., son, M, W, 13, S, grade 6, 9 mos, yes, yes, born Iowa, father Harry L. Spracklin, born Iowa, 48, mother Ackermann, Frieda H, born Iowa, 37, married Iowa.

Spracklin, Geo. W., son, M, W, 10, S, grade 3, 9 mos, yes, yes, born Iowa, father Harry L. Spracklin, born Iowa, 48, mother Ackermann, Frieda H, born Iowa, 37, married Iowa.

Spracklin, Bertha S., daughter, F, W, 8, S, grade 2, 9 mos, yes, yes, born Iowa, father Harry L. Spracklin, born Iowa, 48, mother Ackermann, Frieda H, born Iowa, 37, married Iowa.

Spracklin, Florence M., daughter, F, W, 6, S, infant, father Harry L. Spracklin, born Iowa, 48, mother Ackermann, Frieda H, born Iowa, 37, married Iowa.

Spracklin, Harold L., son, F, W, 2, S, infant, born Iowa, father Harry L. Spracklin, born Iowa, 48, mother Ackermann, Frieda H, born Iowa, 37, married Iowa.

Source: Harry L. Spracklin Family, 1925 Iowa State Census, Davenport Ward 3, Scott Co., Iowa, Roll IA1925_1934, Line 1.

We are missing Alice born in May of 1925.  We have nine children for Harry and eleven for his parents Henry and Elizabeth.

In the next post, I will summarize Harry and Frieda’s family listing the children and what I know about them.

Amarilla tries again for George’s Civil War Pension – 1916 to 1919

Every time the laws were changed and passed a new round of submissions for Civil War pensions would follow. In 1916, Amarilla tried again to obtain George Barclay’s Civil War Pension. This meant that she had to fill out the Declaration for Widow’s Pension form to get things started. The Barclay Hotel burned down in 1915 and it appears she had to seek out another set of marriage, divorce and other papers if she could not find them in her home or hotel and resubmit.

I find that interesting because the government had a 2 inch file on George’s Pension which I obtained from the VA not the National Archives.  Of course the Veteran’s Administration really didn’t start till 1921.

The National Civil War Museum Entrance

The National Civil War Museum Entrance in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

This Widow’s form was filed on 24 October, 1916 and submitted.  As far as I can tell the process took till July of 1919 to finally come to an end. The application was being considered for pension a total of three years in process.

Here is a summary of what happened. In these documents her name is spelled Ammarilla and the last name is Barcklay.

Summary of this attempt at obtaining George Angus Barclay’s Civil War Pension 1916 to 1919

October 24, 1916: Declaration for Widow’s Pension signed and forwarded.

March 2, 1917: Overview card for Remarried Widow of George. A. Barclay with summary of the file.

Jacket cover of Pension

Jacket cover of Pension

April 3, 1917: Letter from War Division to D. Elliott Waggeman, Atty, Wash D.C.

They want testimony from two credible witnesses who knew the soldier from the time he attained marriageable age, showing whether he had been previously married with further instructions in order to comply etc… Signed by the Commissioner. 

April 13, 1917: Letter from the Auditor for the War Department to Treasury Department, Wash D.C.

….For use in the above-cited claim for pension, please furnish a tracing of the soldier’s signature, and loan to this Bureau any papers that may have been filed in a claim for arrears of pay or bounty based on his service. Signed by the Commissioner 

May 12, 1917: Letter from Treasury Department to Commissioner of Pensions, Wash D.C. for Bounty:

An application was filed December 17, 1867, in the Paymaster General’s Office, War Department, for bounty under Act of July 28, 1866, by George Barclay, late of Co. I, 9th Minn. Inf. and said application is herewith transmitted with the request that the same be returned to this office at the earliest practicable date. Signed by a J.L. Baity Auditor. (No copy of this bounty claim was in the pension file).

August 25, 1917: General Affidavit

General Affidavit, Minnesota, Cass County, Personally came before me ____Shiller in and aforesaid County and State Ammarilla Dawes age 58 years, residing in Pine River, Cass Co., Minn. who being dully sworn, declares:

That her husband’s full and correct name was George Angus Barclay and he was born in Connecticut. His age at enlistment as nearly as she can compute was between 16 & 18 (he was 18), and his occupation when he enlisted was farmer, and when he enlisted he lived at Shakopee. She further states that his height was 5 feet 6 inches, his complexion dark, color of eyes dark brown, hair dark, and as to marks and scars she states he had none that she knows of.  She further states that her own maiden name was Spracklin and that after the soldier George Angus Barclay died she was remarried to Jefferson G. Dawes from whom she was divorced in the year 1910 on her own application. She further states as to any former marriages of the solider George Angus Barclay that he was never married until he married the affiant and that she states that she was never married before she married George Angus Barclay. Signed Ammarilla Dawes, and F……Shiller, 25 August 1917. Notary Public seal. 

September 10, 1917: General Affidavit.

That her various places and dates of residence since the death of the soldier, Geo. Barclay, have been Pine River, Cass Co., Minnesota.

Cover form from Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions card with summary of contents. This is like their cover piece.

September 18, 1917: General Affidavit:

John Leef, age 55 residing in Pine River, Cass Co. and Mrs. J. P. Leef aged 50 years. That they have been personally acquainted with the claimant, Ammarilla Dawes since of the date of the death of the solider, George Barclay and that she has not been married since that time other than to Mr. Dawes who divorced.  

November 27, 1917: A note asking for more information about the marriage to Dawes.

January 17, 1918: State of Minnesota, District Court, Co. of Hennepin – the Marriage License of Jefferson and Ammarilla Barclay 2 September 1902 was submitted to the Commissioner.

February 5, 1918: Additional Evidence General Affidavit.

That her husband, Jefferson G. Dawes, did not render any military or naval service to the United States in any capacity. 

July 9, 1918:  This was a note/letter talking about rules about pensions and the marriage of Jefferson G. Dawes and the name and service of George Barclay etc.

July 22, 1918: Returning of documents by Auditor of the War Department, and their divorce papers are submitted by Cass Courthouse County, Minnesota.

March 3, 1919:  Miscellaneous papers contained in the pension file. April 22, 1919 and on April 25, 1919 a formal letter to the Postmaster…. a H.M. Vandervort requesting more information about the situation – ret’d to Chief _______to call on Postmaster at Pine River, Minn. and determine whether she has remarried and what her standing and reputation in the community since February 1, 1910.

The report back is not good something about her living with a man by the name of George Urton and it is not known if they are married. Her reputation is mixed.

May 18, 1919: A letter was sent to the Chief and Special Examination Division requesting a special investigation to 1) to determine whether she has remarried more than once and after her divorce from Dawes which would jeopardize the pension.  2) They then wanted to know her involvement in George’s death.  3) a Mr. Young was assigned the task of investigating Amarilla Barclay Dawes.

June 7, 1919:  A letter telling the Postmaster that they want to personally interview Amarilla and J.G. Dawes, Mr. and Mrs. Leef, please supply information about where they were living, Signed by E. W. Young, Special Examiner.

June 20th, 1919: Letter to Mr. E.W. Young signed by A.K. McPherson, Clerk of the Court, Walker, Minn. He states he finds no evidence in the proceedings of the Coroners inquest that show that any suspicion was lodged against the Widow of the deceased G. A. Barclay.

June 18, 1919 Brainerd – Jefferson G. Dawes personally appears before me E.W. Young…

June 21, 1919 – letter to the Commissioner of Pensions. He is submitting his report with documents on the Claim for George’s pension and E.W. Young’s investigation.  I have moved this ahead of the depositions of J.G. and Amarilla of E.W. Young:

He took the deposition in Brainerd from J.G. Dawes. While husband of the claimant he was also mayor of Pine River and that he was regarded as something of a four-flusher which was reference to his business transactions and he says he observed this behavior in J.G. The special examiner believed J.G.’s testimony about Amarilla. He then went to Pine River and didn’t tell Amarilla about his interview with J.G. prior to visiting her. She is now engaged to George Urton who lives with her. Then the special examiners remembers George that this soldier was a storekeeper, saloonist, postmaster, logger and big in the area, also a hotel keeper and his death and the gossip. The case appears for final action. 

Deposition of J.G. Dawes, June 18, 1919 in Brainerd, Minn. This is a summary not a full transcription.

My age is 70 years last March, my residence and address are Brainerd, MN in real estate business. I got married to Rilla Barcklay in Minneapolis date do not remember, but some 15 or 16 years ago. I did not know her husband in his lifetime. Became acquainted with her at Pine River when I was there on a matter of business. She was in the logging and store business there and wanted me to manage it for her, offering me half. I took it and turned over to her probably as much as $10,000.  He then makes comments about Grace and Ronald which are not good…She and I always lived together after our marriage, until the separation in Pine River, where I built her home she now has….I did not get a divorce from her. She got it from me. I let her get it. He comments about the divorce are not good.  Then Mr. Young asked about her reputation and her conduct during the marriage. J.G. proceeds to give details about her behavior which are not good…He states he has no interest in her pension claim and nothing against it.  

Deposition of Amarilla Dawes, June 19, 1919 in Pine River, MN. This is a summary and not a full transcription.

My residence and address are Pine River, Cass Co., Minn, am keeping house, I am claiming pension as the widow of George. A. Barcklay who was a Civil War Soldier. He was not a pensioner. My only claim to pension has been made on account of him. He was in the I, 9 Minn. Inf. I married Jefferson G. Dawes after Barcklay’s death, date do not remember.  Married him at Minneapolis and got divorced from him going to Bemidji to meet the judge, I guess the papers are in Walker….She talks about George Urton and that she is engaged to be married. Mr. Young proceeds to ask her questions about her conduct and she replies refuting J.G.’s comments.  I was never accused of having anything to do with Mr. Barcklay’s death, except by Mr. Dawes. She mentions Louis Bebeau being arrested, tried and acquitted of the murder of her husband. I would rather forgo any pension I might possibility get than to have this read in the presence of witnesses or to have any further inquiry made about it. 

July 8, 1919: Wid. Org. Ammarilla former widow of Geo. A. Barclay…Pension is rejected warranted on the facts show in this claim? 1) Adulterous cohabitation while claimant was the wife of J.C. Dawes is no bar to pension. 2) There is nothing to show adulterous cohabitation after claimant’s divorce from Dawes until Sept/Oct 1918.

July 10, 1919: Another statement, our further consideration of the case and in view of claimant’s statement before the special examiner that she would rather foregoing any pension she might possibly get than to have her deposition read in the presence of witnesses or to have any further inquiry made about it. The claim may be rejected as if now stands on the ground of abandonment of further prosecution of same as declared in her deposition taken by special examiner on June 191, 1919. Signed A.A. Aspenwall, Chief, Board of Review.

On July 22, 1919: C.M. Saltzgaber, Commissioner writes to W. Elliott Waggaman, Atty, Wash D.C. and to Amarilla that the claim is rejected on the ground of the claim’s abandonment of further prosecution of claim etc.

Well, isn’t this a fine pickle. I really am proud of my great-grandmother for abandoning the pension claim. I think both her and J.G. did not have any understanding of what was happening and it appears they were not informed by Mr. Young that he was going to approach them both.  It was unfortunate but not uncommon that this type of investigation occurred.

It seems to me the facts were:  1) Whether George was a soldier and what was his service; 2) that George and Amarilla were married, where and when; 3) when did George die; 4) after George’s death her remarriage to J.G. Dawes, where and when; 5) and that Amarilla divorced Dawes in 1910; 6) she had not remarried but was engaged to George Urton in 1918.  These are the facts to me, anything else is irrelevant, but this apparently was not the case as the quote below presents:

The Commissioner of Pensions refused to issue a certificate to allow pension under the special act on the ground the evidence shows that since the passage of the act of August 7, 1882, and prior to an since the approval of the special act, the claimant has been guilty of open and notorious adulterous cohabitation. Appeal was entered August 14, 1919.  

One of the general provisions of the pension laws is as follows:  the open and notorious adulterous cohabitation of a widow who is a pensioner shall operate to terminate her pension from the commencement of such cohabitation. Act of August 7, 1882, sec. 2, 22 Stat., 345.

Source:  Decisions of the Department of the Interior in Appealed Pension and Bounty Claims, Editors John W. Bixler and Ralph W. Kirkham, Google Books. page 441.

Amarilla would try one more time in 1939 for George’s pension and get a little help from her grandson Gordon.  If you are wondering what the term “four-flusher” used to describe J.G. means it is a reference to the game of poker and how someone presents a certain face to others.  I have posted about J.G. Dawes on this blog and you can review his posts and Amarilla’s just go to the Page at the top of this blog that covers George and Amarilla’s table of contents of posts written.

Daniel D. Spracklin and Sarah Blacketer Allgood’s final Resting Place and possible Military Service for Daniel…

I had the good fortune to travel to Iowa in 2003 and visit the Community Cemetery near Millersburg, Iowa, where Daniel rests with his second wife Sarah and youngest son Alfred. I have shared about them and their burial in detail in my BJM Cemeteries Discovery blog and also on this blog. I encourage you to review those posts for more information.

Here again are photos of the cemetery and their tombstones.

Church and cemetery are next to each other, Community Cemetery, Iowa

Church and cemetery are next to each other, Community Cemetery, Iowa

EntrancetoCommunityCemtry

Entrance to the Community Cemetery

DD Spracklin and Sarah's tombstone

DD Spracklin and Sarah’s tombstone

Alfred is to the left of his parents.

Alfred is to the left of his parents.

Alfred Spracklin tombstone 2

Alfred’s tombstone

Before I leave Daniel D. Spracklin and share about his children, I want to address a dilemma.  I have been unable to locate Daniel in the 1860 U.S. Census even after doing a page by page search for Benton County, Iowa.  I find Henry, Mary and Amarilla his children living with other people in Benton Co., Iowa in 1860 and have shared about this in a past post.  A cousin believes that Daniel mustered into the Civil War at that time and there is a document that exists with the name Daniel D. Spracklin listed being born in Ohio on this form.  It does list him as unmarried but remember Elizabeth Keller Spracklin had died in March  of 1859 so he was no longer married but a widow.

Military Duty for Daniel D. Spracklin 1860.

Military Duty for Daniel D. Spracklin 1860.

It reads:  Comprises all persons subject to military duty between the ages of twenty and thirty-five years, and all unmarried persons subject to military duty above the ages of thirty-five years and forty-five.  Class two comprises of all other persons subject to military duty.

4th Congressional District consisting of the counties of Tama, Benton, Jasper, Iowa, Johnson, Marion and Mahaska and Keokuk, Monroe, Wappello, Appanoose. Enumerated June, July 1863 under the direction of Capt. James Mathews, Provost Marshall.  Washington Twp., Iowa Co., Spracklin, Daniel D. 33 years old, White, Steam Saw Miller, unmarried, born Ohio, Station Headquarters 4th Congressional District Iowa, August 5, 1863, #590.  This record is at Ancestry under:  U.S. Civil War Draft Registrations, 1863 to 1865.  His brother Solomon Goss Spracklin is also listed as having served.  There are several Charles Algood’s listed and I am thinking that one of these might be Sarah’s first husband.  I have not been able to learn much about his fate.

The Family Search Wiki might help regarding Iowa’s roll in the Civil War:

https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Iowa_in_the_Civil_War

Iowa has a site with the  USGenWeb:  http://iagenweb.org/civilwar/

G.A.R. Records Lost for Pap Thomas Post…1911

George Angus Barclay was an old soldier and he participated in the GAR – Grand Army of the Republic.

Much to my disappointment, the records for his local GAR post were lost in a fire. I did find his brother Alexander’s which survived.  There was some information but not as much as I had hoped.  Apparently the GAR gave George a big funeral and it would be great to have that information in more detail.

There was an article in the newspaper for Brainerd Dispatch May 26, 1911, page 1 column 6 titled:

Roster of Heroes Dead – List as Compiled for Dispatch by Pro. J.A. Wilson,

A Veteran of the Civil War.

Old Soldiers GAR

Old Soldiers GAR

There are over 80 names mentioned in the article.  It goes on to state that the Old Grand Army Records Were Destroyed in Odd Fellow Hall Fire of Last year. George appears about 23 names down: Geo. Barclay, 9th Minn. Inf.

There is a book titled: “Brainerd’s Half Century,” by Ingolf Dillan, published in 1923 by the General Print Co., in Minneapolis.  On page 138 there is a listing of the members of the Pap Thomas Post No. 30 with “Not Here” as the title?  George Angus Barclay is listed as sixth person down on the list.

There are muster rolls for the Pap Thomas post 30, located at Brainerd, County of Crow Wing, Minnesota.

Age: 48 years old and born in Connecticut

Residence was Pine River

Occupation Lumber

Entry into service August 18, 1862

Rank Wagoner, company [J or I] 9 Minnesota

Final discharge August 24, 1865, rank Wagoner, Co. [J or I] 9 Minnesota

Length of serve 36 months to end of war.

At the very least there is the newspaper account of the condition of the GAR Records for Pap Thomas Post No. 30 so we at least know the state of those documents.

George Angus Barclay is buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in Brainerd.