Daniel D. Spracklin and Sarah Blacketer Allgood’s final Resting Place and possible Military Service for Daniel…

I had the good fortune to travel to Iowa in 2003 and visit the Community Cemetery near Millersburg, Iowa, where Daniel rests with his second wife Sarah and youngest son Alfred. I have shared about them and their burial in detail in my BJM Cemeteries Discovery blog and also on this blog. I encourage you to review those posts for more information.

Here again are photos of the cemetery and their tombstones.

Church and cemetery are next to each other, Community Cemetery, Iowa

Church and cemetery are next to each other, Community Cemetery, Iowa


Entrance to the Community Cemetery

DD Spracklin and Sarah's tombstone

DD Spracklin and Sarah’s tombstone

Alfred is to the left of his parents.

Alfred is to the left of his parents.

Alfred Spracklin tombstone 2

Alfred’s tombstone

Before I leave Daniel D. Spracklin and share about his children, I want to address a dilemma.  I have been unable to locate Daniel in the 1860 U.S. Census even after doing a page by page search for Benton County, Iowa.  I find Henry, Mary and Amarilla his children living with other people in Benton Co., Iowa in 1860 and have shared about this in a past post.  A cousin believes that Daniel mustered into the Civil War at that time and there is a document that exists with the name Daniel D. Spracklin listed being born in Ohio on this form.  It does list him as unmarried but remember Elizabeth Keller Spracklin had died in March  of 1859 so he was no longer married but a widow.

Military Duty for Daniel D. Spracklin 1860.

Military Duty for Daniel D. Spracklin 1860.

It reads:  Comprises all persons subject to military duty between the ages of twenty and thirty-five years, and all unmarried persons subject to military duty above the ages of thirty-five years and forty-five.  Class two comprises of all other persons subject to military duty.

4th Congressional District consisting of the counties of Tama, Benton, Jasper, Iowa, Johnson, Marion and Mahaska and Keokuk, Monroe, Wappello, Appanoose. Enumerated June, July 1863 under the direction of Capt. James Mathews, Provost Marshall.  Washington Twp., Iowa Co., Spracklin, Daniel D. 33 years old, White, Steam Saw Miller, unmarried, born Ohio, Station Headquarters 4th Congressional District Iowa, August 5, 1863, #590.  This record is at Ancestry under:  U.S. Civil War Draft Registrations, 1863 to 1865.  His brother Solomon Goss Spracklin is also listed as having served.  There are several Charles Algood’s listed and I am thinking that one of these might be Sarah’s first husband.  I have not been able to learn much about his fate.

The Family Search Wiki might help regarding Iowa’s roll in the Civil War:


Iowa has a site with the  USGenWeb:  http://iagenweb.org/civilwar/

G.A.R. Records Lost for Pap Thomas Post…1911

George Angus Barclay was an old soldier and he participated in the GAR – Grand Army of the Republic.

Much to my disappointment, the records for his local GAR post were lost in a fire. I did find his brother Alexander’s which survived.  There was some information but not as much as I had hoped.  Apparently the GAR gave George a big funeral and it would be great to have that information in more detail.

There was an article in the newspaper for Brainerd Dispatch May 26, 1911, page 1 column 6 titled:

Roster of Heroes Dead – List as Compiled for Dispatch by Pro. J.A. Wilson,

A Veteran of the Civil War.

Old Soldiers GAR

Old Soldiers GAR

There are over 80 names mentioned in the article.  It goes on to state that the Old Grand Army Records Were Destroyed in Odd Fellow Hall Fire of Last year. George appears about 23 names down: Geo. Barclay, 9th Minn. Inf.

There is a book titled: “Brainerd’s Half Century,” by Ingolf Dillan, published in 1923 by the General Print Co., in Minneapolis.  On page 138 there is a listing of the members of the Pap Thomas Post No. 30 with “Not Here” as the title?  George Angus Barclay is listed as sixth person down on the list.

There are muster rolls for the Pap Thomas post 30, located at Brainerd, County of Crow Wing, Minnesota.

Age: 48 years old and born in Connecticut

Residence was Pine River

Occupation Lumber

Entry into service August 18, 1862

Rank Wagoner, company [J or I] 9 Minnesota

Final discharge August 24, 1865, rank Wagoner, Co. [J or I] 9 Minnesota

Length of serve 36 months to end of war.

At the very least there is the newspaper account of the condition of the GAR Records for Pap Thomas Post No. 30 so we at least know the state of those documents.

George Angus Barclay is buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in Brainerd.

Alexander Barclay’s Final Resting Place…

Alexander Barclay was buried in the Corinthians Cemetery in Farmington, Dakota County, Minnesota.  Corinthian Cemetery shares the area with another cemetery St. Michael’s Catholic Cemetery.

Corinthian Cemetery is not on the main street of Farmington.

Corinthian Cemetery is not on the main street of Farmington.

Alexander’s tombstone is under my maintenance at Find A Grave after the original poster kindly transferred it to me.


Here I am with the tombstone of my great great uncle Alexander Barclay.  You can see the storm clouds forming in the background and I look very cold.  We could not dally because the sky opened up.

Me, Alexander Barclay and a storm

Me, Alexander Barclay and a storm

I am amazed at the size of the monument for Alexander but dismayed that there was no flag or indication of Alexander’s service in the Civil War.  Something I will have to attend to.  Any help would be appreciated just leave a comment.

Corinthian Cemetery, Farmington, Minnesota.

Corinthian Cemetery, Farmington, Minnesota.

Alexander died 9 December 1905 but he was buried 17 December 1905. Something must have happened regarding the burial of Alexander’s body that required an affidavit to be prepared and signed by the heirs protesting the removal of Alexander’s body from Farmington?  There were no other documents in the probate packet but there might be documents in the court clerk books at the courthouse?  Yes, we have a mystery.

Protestion of Removal of Body

Protesting of the Removal of the Body

The Death of George’s Brother Alexander Barclay!

About a month before the birth of Miriam to Grace and Ronald McDonald of International Falls, Alexander Barclay passed away.  He was a brother of George Barclay.

I have featured Alexander on this blog many times.  He has been very important to the research on the Barclays. In some posts I just mention Alexander as way to link him to the other family members.  Here is a list of posts about Alexander Barclay:  You can use the Archives box or just put his name into the search engine box on the right.

  • Alexander Barclay Attends his brother George’s Funeral, January 27, 2014
  • 1890: Alexander Barclay, Awarded Civil War Pension! April 7, 2012
  • Catching up with Alexander Barclay: Dakota County, MN, March 22, 2012
  • A Son is born: George Alexander Barclay 1880!, March 3, 2011
  • Brother Alexander Barclay’s Civil War Service…July 11, 2010
  • Evergreen Cemetery Final Resting Place for G.A. Barclay, February 3, 2014
  • The Murder Investigation regarding the Death of George A. Barclay? Dec 16, 2013.
  • After the Death of John Barclay his wife Ellen lives another 10 years! August 8, 2013.
  • John Barclay December 1897, George’s Father succumbs! July 11, 2013.
  • 1895 State Census – The Barclays, February 7, 2013.
  • The 1890 Census and Veteran’s Schedules – John Barclay, Feb. 25, 2012
  • George Barclay On His Own: A Trading Post! September 21, 2010.
  • John Barclay’s Land! September 11, 2010.
  • The Naturalizaton of John Barclay, August 26, 2010.
  • After the Civil War – George and Alexander Try Farming? August 19, 2010
  • John Barclay Joins the Fight! August 7, 2010.
  • The 2nd Family of John Barclay, May 23, 2010
  • John Barclay’s Two Families, April 3, 2010

According to my records, Alexander died on the 9th of December 1905.  He was buried in the Corinthian Cemetery in Farmington, Dakota Co., Minnesota. I visited this cemetery in 2007.

I had all sorts of trouble finding Alexander’s death date because he was not appearing in Dakota County, Minnesota. It turns out his death was not easy and he died in the Hospital for the Insane in Rochester, Olmsted County, Minnesota.


Rochester Patient Registers: #7127, 80, Alexander Barclay, Admitted Nov. 5, 1905, from Dakota Co., 63 years, single, religion: none, ____ , born in Conn. Hartford, ill health, unknown, sen. dem., no. of attackes 1, no. of admittances 1, age 62, 9 mos., 9 mos. 24 days, time in hospital 24 days, Died Dec 5, 1905, ex. sen. dem. # Box 1 Vol. A & B., pg. 179. 

Rochester State Hospital Adm. & Discharge: #243 Alexander Barclay, Residence: Farmington, Dakota Co., Admitted Nov. 15, 1905, Died Dec. 9, 1905 114.B.9.7B Box 1 1879-1955.  

Obituary Record – Rochester State Hospital – Line 9, 1905, Dec. 9, Alexander Barclay, Male, age 63 Single, Farmer, born Conn., Came from Dakota Co., Disease is unreadable. No. of attacks 1, No. of admissions 1, Case #7140. Admitted 1905 Dec. 8. In residence 7 days, total duration of disease 1 year 7 days. Cause of Death Ex in Sen Dem. Remains removed.

Minnesota Death Certificates – Died 1905, Dec 9, Rochester, Olmsted Co., Minn. Exhaustion in Senile Dementia, Alexander Barclay, not stated, MWS, Farmer, Conn. R.M. Phelps M.D., A.S. Adams H.O.

I discovered the end of his life by accident.  I was working diligently at the Minnesota Historical Society on their newspaper collection and in the pages of the Dakota County Newspaper I found entries in the published town finances for Farmington under County Finances, Dakota County Disbursements.  There were two entries in this listing of the county finances regarding Alexander.  There was also an article about court proceedings which committed Alexander to the hospital in Rochester.

City Expenses:  pg. 2, 4 col. Insane Expense, #1581, W. H. Brownell # 50 o Court #1582.

City Expenses: Dr. J. C. Fitch $7.50 Dr. H. N. Rogers examination $7.50 for A. Barclay, $8.49. 

Adjudged Insane: Alexander Barclay; of Farmington, was adjudged insane by Judge T.P. Moran on Tuesday evening, and committed to the hospital at Rochester. He was formerly a resident of Lakeville, and is sixty-three years of age. He was taken there by Deputy A.C. Nesbitt and W.W. Carmon Wednesday.  

Back then any sickness including old age was turned over to the state hospital and it was not till about 1950 and beyond that we started to see these different symptoms of aging in a different light such as dementia. Since Alexander was single and there was no family to care for him nearby the town and county took action.  Unfortunately, this condition is part of my family medical history.

Fortunately, several obituary notices were found with the help of the Dakota County Historical Society, which give a little more information about his life.

Obituary notice in the Hastings Gazette, Saturday 23 December 1905.

“Alexander Barclay, a former well known resident of Lakeville, died at the Rochester hospital on the 9th inst., aged sixty-four years. He was a bachelor and a veteran of the civil war, and was committed from Farmington Nov. 15th. Internment at Corinthian Cemetery, Farmington, on Sunday under the auspices of Canby Post.”

Hastings Obit for Alexander

Hastings Obit for Alexander

Obituary notice in the Dakota County Tribune, Friday 22 December 1905.

“Death of Alex Barclay, Alex Barclay formally of Farmington died on Dec 9th at Rochester. His body was brought to Farmington where he was buried Sunday Dec 17th.

Mr. Barclay was an old soldier having enlisted in Co. C 4th Minnesota Sept 25th 1861, which was stationed at Fort Ripley where they did duty among the Chippewa Indians until April 1862. From there they went south to St Louis where they received the necessary equipments and then joined General Grants army at Pittsburg Landing. He participated in all their engagements up to and including the siege of Vicksburg Miss, where he joined Sherman’s army which he accompanied to Chattanooga, and was in all their engagements from Chattanooga to Atlanta. He continued with Sherman’s army thru Georgia and the Carolina’s and was with them at the surrender of Johnson near Rolin NC. He then went to Washington and was in the grand reunion in May 1865. From Washington he was transferred to Kentucky where he was discharged Aug. 9th, 1865. Mr. Barclay leaves two brothers in California, a half brother in Shakopee, a sister in the east and a niece who lives near the Canadian line. He was a member of Canby Post GAR No 47 of Farmington and was 63 years old at the time of his death.”

The last obituary is very well done except for the description of Alexander’s family. There were eleven (11)  heirs two of which were children of his oldest brother John Avery Barclay.

The family of Alexander, rallied and had his body shipped back to Farmington where he had made his home since 1870.

Alexander does appear in the records of the Canby Post GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) No. 47. The only regret I have is there is no picture of Alexander.

Here is a link to a timeline for the Civil War.  If you scroll down you will see pictures of the Grand Review Parade at the end of the war:   https://civilwarinvirginia.wordpress.com/page/8/

Amarilla tries for George’s Civil War Pension 1898…

Widows Application 1898

Widows Application 1898 portion of…

On November 21, 1898 Amarilla tried again for George’s Civil War pension remember that George tried at least twice to get this money but failed.  She filed the Declaration for Widow’s Pension in the county of Crow Wing with the help of Henry D. Philips Law Offices of Washington D.C.

Something happened because the claim had the word ABANDONED stamped a on December 9, 1898 document and several others.

Apparently on 21 November 1900, J.G. Dawes appears on another Declaration of Widow’s Pension with Amarilla.   J.G. Dawes was the notary public at the bottom of the form.  So J.G. tried to help her out.

Several other documents followed from friends and a physician.  They are very interesting and I wonder what stories these people would have told about George and Amarilla.

General Affidavit of Bertha Mickelson, 25 February 1901.

That she was well acquainted with George Barclay deceased for a period of 4 years before his death.  That in the evening of October 29, 1898 about half pass seven o’clock said George Barclay was shot and killed by a person unknown at the time he was sitting in a chair in his own house.  I heard the report of the gun saw him fall and he expired on the floor where he fell.  The ball passed through his neck.  The shot was fired from outside of building and was fired through a window. 

The Physician’s Affidavit was signed by T. F. [Rodwell] M.D. on the 7th of August 1901.

That he is a practicing physician and that he has been acquainted with the said soldier two years, and that he was a man then whose general appearance would not admit I should judge of unusual labor.  I met George Barclay September 1896 and occasionally until his death Oct. 1898.  Where I was called to testify as to cause of death which was from a bullet fired by some unknown person while said Barclay was seated in his house at Pine River passing through his neck thereby causing instant death. 

General Affidavit of John Bubar, age 53 years  Henry Shalding, age 46 years citizens of Brainerd, 28 January 1902.

That they knew personally and were well acquainted with the soldier, George A. Barclay, for a period of 28 years commencing in the year 1867 and continuing up to the  time of his death in the year 1898; that they are acquainted with and have known personally Ammarilla Barclay, widow of George A. Barclay, soldier, for a period of 20 years commencing in the year 1882 and continuing up to the present time; that they personally know said George A. Barclay and Ammarilla Barclay were married and lived together as husband and wife; that they verily believe that said George A. Barclay and Ammarilla Barclay or either of them, was never married prior to their said marriage; that the contents of this affidavit are known to affiants by personal knowledge, observation and acquaintance for a time as aforesaid. 

Something happened and the lawyers were still trying to get a resolution in 1905 and 1906 but it doesn’t appear anything came of it.  You notice that the time frame it really stretched out which means that it was difficult to get resolution.  Every time the law was updated there would be a flood of these widows declarations. Every time Amarilla applied she would have to resubmit documentation.

The Coroner’s Inquest Verdict regarding the Death of G. A. Barclay!

The Coroner’s Inquest regarding the murder of George A. Barclay took two days.  On the second day a verdict was issued and it was recorded in the Register of the Coroner, Cass County, Minnesota.  It appeared in the newspaper the next day.

Register of Coroner's Inquest

Register of Coroner’s Inquest

Source: The Register of Coroner’s Inquests, County of Cass, State of Minnesota, in the Matter of the Inquest held upon the body of George A. Barclay, by E.R. Sundberg, acting Coroner of said County.

Nov. 2, 1899: Oct 31, the following jury was impaneled J.B. Spencer, B. O’Connor, Peter Dennis, John A. Wilson. Jury sworn and examination opened.  Verdict of Jury: That the said George A. Barclay came to his death on Oct 29, 1898 between 7 & 8 P.M. O’clock while sitting in his Hotel office by a bullet passing through his neck from a gun or revolver in the hands of some person on the outside of the building and to this jury unknown.  In testimony whereof the said coroner and jurors of this inquest have hereunto set their hands the 2nd day of Nov. 1898.   John King, Foreman, R.D. Holden, P. Dennis, John A Wilson, J.B. Spencer, B. O’Connor.  E.R. Sundberg, Justice of the Peace, & Acting Coroner. 

The following appeared in the Cass County Pioneer on November 3, 1898

“The Coroner’s jury sitting over the remains of Geo. Barclay after a two day session brought a verdict as follows:  We find that deceased came to his death by a gun shot wound inflicted by some party unknown to the jury.” Particulars next week.”

The next week issue for November 10th was missing on the film at the Minnesota Historical Society.

There is no official death certificate for George A. Barclay at the Cass County Courthouse per my personal investigation. After George’s death,  Amarilla tried for his Civil War pension on several occasions and below is an affidavit that described the death of George A. Barclay several years later.

Bertha Michelson on February 25, 1901 made this statement, she knew George about 4 years.  It is interesting to me that she was not among the witnesses at the Coroner’s Inquest?

That she was well acquainted with George Barclay deceased for a period of 4 years before his death.  That in the evening of October 29th, 1898, about half passed seven o’clock said George Barclay was shot and killed by a person unknown at the time he was sitting in a chair in his own house.  I heard the report of the gun saw him fall and he expired on the floor where he fell. The ball passed through his neck.  The shot was fired from outside of building and was fired through a window.” 

It could be assumed that this would be the end of the investigation of George A. Barclay’s death, but it was not.  A Grand Jury would be called in May of 1899 and then in May of 1900 there would be a trial.  There was more events to come in this sad tale.