The Death of George’s Brother Alexander Barclay!

About a month before the birth of Miriam to Grace and Ronald McDonald of International Falls, Alexander Barclay passed away.  He was a brother of George Barclay.

I have featured Alexander on this blog many times.  He has been very important to the research on the Barclays. In some posts I just mention Alexander as way to link him to the other family members.  Here is a list of posts about Alexander Barclay:  You can use the Archives box or just put his name into the search engine box on the right.

  • Alexander Barclay Attends his brother George’s Funeral, January 27, 2014
  • 1890: Alexander Barclay, Awarded Civil War Pension! April 7, 2012
  • Catching up with Alexander Barclay: Dakota County, MN, March 22, 2012
  • A Son is born: George Alexander Barclay 1880!, March 3, 2011
  • Brother Alexander Barclay’s Civil War Service…July 11, 2010
  • Evergreen Cemetery Final Resting Place for G.A. Barclay, February 3, 2014
  • The Murder Investigation regarding the Death of George A. Barclay? Dec 16, 2013.
  • After the Death of John Barclay his wife Ellen lives another 10 years! August 8, 2013.
  • John Barclay December 1897, George’s Father succumbs! July 11, 2013.
  • 1895 State Census – The Barclays, February 7, 2013.
  • The 1890 Census and Veteran’s Schedules – John Barclay, Feb. 25, 2012
  • George Barclay On His Own: A Trading Post! September 21, 2010.
  • John Barclay’s Land! September 11, 2010.
  • The Naturalizaton of John Barclay, August 26, 2010.
  • After the Civil War – George and Alexander Try Farming? August 19, 2010
  • John Barclay Joins the Fight! August 7, 2010.
  • The 2nd Family of John Barclay, May 23, 2010
  • John Barclay’s Two Families, April 3, 2010

According to my records, Alexander died on the 9th of December 1905.  He was buried in the Corinthian Cemetery in Farmington, Dakota Co., Minnesota. I visited this cemetery in 2007.

I had all sorts of trouble finding Alexander’s death date because he was not appearing in Dakota County, Minnesota. It turns out his death was not easy and he died in the Hospital for the Insane in Rochester, Olmsted County, Minnesota.

AlexBarclayDeathCert445

Rochester Patient Registers: #7127, 80, Alexander Barclay, Admitted Nov. 5, 1905, from Dakota Co., 63 years, single, religion: none, ____ , born in Conn. Hartford, ill health, unknown, sen. dem., no. of attackes 1, no. of admittances 1, age 62, 9 mos., 9 mos. 24 days, time in hospital 24 days, Died Dec 5, 1905, ex. sen. dem. #114.6.1.5B Box 1 Vol. A & B., pg. 179. 

Rochester State Hospital Adm. & Discharge: #243 Alexander Barclay, Residence: Farmington, Dakota Co., Admitted Nov. 15, 1905, Died Dec. 9, 1905 114.B.9.7B Box 1 1879-1955.  

Obituary Record – Rochester State Hospital – Line 9, 1905, Dec. 9, Alexander Barclay, Male, age 63 Single, Farmer, born Conn., Came from Dakota Co., Disease is unreadable. No. of attacks 1, No. of admissions 1, Case #7140. Admitted 1905 Dec. 8. In residence 7 days, total duration of disease 1 year 7 days. Cause of Death Ex in Sen Dem. Remains removed.

Minnesota Death Certificates – Died 1905, Dec 9, Rochester, Olmsted Co., Minn. Exhaustion in Senile Dementia, Alexander Barclay, not stated, MWS, Farmer, Conn. R.M. Phelps M.D., A.S. Adams H.O.

I discovered the end of his life by accident.  I was working diligently at the Minnesota Historical Society on their newspaper collection and in the pages of the Dakota County Newspaper I found entries in the published town finances for Farmington under County Finances, Dakota County Disbursements.  There were two entries in this listing of the county finances regarding Alexander.  There was also an article about court proceedings which committed Alexander to the hospital in Rochester.

City Expenses:  pg. 2, 4 col. Insane Expense, #1581, W. H. Brownell # 50 o Court #1582.

City Expenses: Dr. J. C. Fitch $7.50 Dr. H. N. Rogers examination $7.50 for A. Barclay, $8.49. 

Adjudged Insane: Alexander Barclay; of Farmington, was adjudged insane by Judge T.P. Moran on Tuesday evening, and committed to the hospital at Rochester. He was formerly a resident of Lakeville, and is sixty-three years of age. He was taken there by Deputy A.C. Nesbitt and W.W. Carmon Wednesday.  

Back then any sickness including old age was turned over to the state hospital and it was not till about 1950 and beyond that we started to see these different symptoms of aging in a different light such as dementia. Since Alexander was single and there was no family to care for him nearby the town and county took action.  Unfortunately, this condition is part of my family medical history.

Fortunately, several obituary notices were found with the help of the Dakota County Historical Society, which give a little more information about his life.

Obituary notice in the Hastings Gazette, Saturday 23 December 1905.

“Alexander Barclay, a former well known resident of Lakeville, died at the Rochester hospital on the 9th inst., aged sixty-four years. He was a bachelor and a veteran of the civil war, and was committed from Farmington Nov. 15th. Internment at Corinthian Cemetery, Farmington, on Sunday under the auspices of Canby Post.”

Hastings Obit for Alexander

Hastings Obit for Alexander

Obituary notice in the Dakota County Tribune, Friday 22 December 1905.

“Death of Alex Barclay, Alex Barclay formally of Farmington died on Dec 9th at Rochester. His body was brought to Farmington where he was buried Sunday Dec 17th.

Mr. Barclay was an old soldier having enlisted in Co. C 4th Minnesota Sept 25th 1861, which was stationed at Fort Ripley where they did duty among the Chippewa Indians until April 1862. From there they went south to St Louis where they received the necessary equipments and then joined General Grants army at Pittsburg Landing. He participated in all their engagements up to and including the siege of Vicksburg Miss, where he joined Sherman’s army which he accompanied to Chattanooga, and was in all their engagements from Chattanooga to Atlanta. He continued with Sherman’s army thru Georgia and the Carolina’s and was with them at the surrender of Johnson near Rolin NC. He then went to Washington and was in the grand reunion in May 1865. From Washington he was transferred to Kentucky where he was discharged Aug. 9th, 1865. Mr. Barclay leaves two brothers in California, a half brother in Shakopee, a sister in the east and a niece who lives near the Canadian line. He was a member of Canby Post GAR No 47 of Farmington and was 63 years old at the time of his death.”

The last obituary is very well done except for the description of Alexander’s family. There were eleven (11)  heirs two of which were children of his oldest brother John Avery Barclay.

The family of Alexander, rallied and had his body shipped back to Farmington where he had made his home since 1870.

Alexander does appear in the records of the Canby Post GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) No. 47. The only regret I have is there is no picture of Alexander.

Here is a link to a timeline for the Civil War.  If you scroll down you will see pictures of the Grand Review Parade at the end of the war:   https://civilwarinvirginia.wordpress.com/page/8/

Another Grand-daughter arrives in January of 1906…

Amarilla added to her duties as grandmother with another grandchild.

Miriam McDonald about 1909

Miriam McDonald about 1909

This grandchild was Miriam Audrey Amarilla McDonald.  Miriam was born the 15th of January 1906 in International Falls where her parents Grace (Barclay) and R.S. McDonald had moved. She was baptized on February 4, 1906 under the name Maria.  Her godfather was John McDonald and godmother was Mrs. McDonald.  I think the sponsors were R.S.’s brother and wife.

Miriam about 1913

Miriam about 1913

I have no baby pictures of Miriam. Most of the photos start when she was about 3 or 4 years old.

Miriam has been featured in her brother Keith’s blog “The Man Who Lived Airplanes.”  You can find the link to this blog on the right side panel of this blog.  Just put Miriam in the search engine of that blog and you will find lots of articles and pictures of her and her family.  I found about 10 posts.

Miriam is very important, because she was the one that got the writer of this blog and the others interested in the family genealogy.  In about 1967 she sent me six pages of typewritten notes on our family.  Later I was to find more and it eventually became about nine pages.  I am greatly indebted to Miriam for these notes and have shared them on this blog and the one mentioned above.

Miriam about 1940

Miriam about 1940

This photo above is one of my favorites of her.  She never married but had a long good life traveling to many places in the world, teaching ninth grade English for years at Franklin High School in Yakima. She was devoted to her family up to the very end.  Oh, she made the best Pecan pie ever…!

Amarilla’s Father Daniel and half-brother Reed Form a Partnership!

Amarilla, as I have written, came from a rather large family.  Her father Daniel married twice, first to Elizabeth Keller who was Amarilla’s mother.  The first marriage produced four children:  Henry, Oliver, Mary and Amarilla.  Henry was killed in an accident in Davenport, Iowa in 1893.  Oliver and Mary died young.

After Elizabeth’s death in 1859 he remarried to Sarah Blacketer Allgood in Iowa in 1863 in Iowa.

Sarah, Daniel’s second wife, brought to the marriage one daughter Emily.  There had been four born to Sarah and Charles Edward Allgood but they did not survive.  The other children were: John G., James H., and Phoebe.

From Sarah and Daniel’s marriage Amarilla gained seven other siblings:

1. Lydia Marie Spracklin

2. Virda Huston Spracklin

3.  Reed Andrews Spracklin

4. Daniel Goss Spracklin

5.  Peter George Spracklin

6.  Charles Edward Spracklin

7. Alfred Spracklin who died young and is buried with his parents in Iowa.

I have written about the first 4 children from the first marriage, some about Daniel and his migration from Ohio to Iowa on this blog.  I have posted about his marriage to Elizabeth Keller and her heritage on my other blog Solomon Goss of Fearing Twp., in Ohio.  See sidebar for a link.

In every family there always seems to be the one person that handles the family business.  In the second family of Daniel and Sarah that was the third child and second son Reed Andrews Spracklin.

Reed Spracklin

Reed Spracklin

About 1905 Reed and Daniel made an agreement that Reed would help out on the farm in Dayton Twp., Iowa Co., Iowa.  So Reed moved in with his parents bringing his family with him. Daniel was 75 years old in 1900 and Sarah was 69 years old. The parents were definitely aged.

Reed had made Calhoun County, Iowa his home  and it is where he married and started raising his family.  His sister Lydia and brothers Virda and Daniel also had ties to Calhoun County, Iowa. Brother Peter was living up in Emmett Co., Iowa.

We do see that in 1905 Charles Edward was living with the parents and Reed.

This Special Iowa State Census for 1905 reads:

R. A. Spracklin, PO Deep River.
Julia Spracklin, Deep River
Oliver Spracklin, Deep River
D.D. Spracklin, Deep River
C. E. Spracklin, Deep River
Sarah Spracklin, Deep River

This state census is only a list of people with no other information provided. This does place Reed and his family with D.D. around 1905.

Source:  1905 Iowa State Census, Dayton Twp., Iowa County, Iowa, Lines 424 to 430, #1026383, Iowa County Genealogical Society, Marengo, Iowa.

Reed and his family would stay with his parents until Daniel died and inherit 2/3’s of the family farm and estate of his father.  The remaining 1/3 would be divided among the rest of the siblings including Amarilla.  So Reed would take on the role of the Administrator of his father’s estate in 1915. Daniel did not have a will.

There will be more about the Daniel’s second family in future posts.

The 1905 Minnesota Census – Amarilla and J.G.

Pine River was changing and growing up, so to speak.  The 1905 Minnesota State Census for Pine River includes both Jefferson G. Dawes and Amarilla on lines 11 and 12.  They are on page 1 of this census for the Village of Pine River.  They are enumerated after the Wideman family and after them come the Tardies, Phillip and Anna.  Mr. Tardy is listed for his occupation Saloon.  Amarilla and J.G. are listed as “retired.”  The Wideman’s are merchants.

1905 Minnesota State Census, Pine River, Twp. of Waldon, ED 9, County of Cass, State of Minnesota, enumerated on June 1 and 2, 1905, by Daniel Kline.

1905MinnJ&ADawes

 

A piece of good news:

The Pine River Journal with a date span of 1935 to 1946 is on display at the Minnesota Digital Library,

Minnesota Reflections http://reflections.mndigital.org/cdm/

This is much later than my time period at the moment but still good news.  You might want to check out their website.  When I was researching I used the actual newspapers at the Pine River Journal office in Pine River, and the Minnesota Historical Society newspaper collection in St. Paul.  I noticed that some of the Pine River newspapers were not microfilmed and in the MHS collection so I am glad to see this run of the Pine River Journal online.

1904 Pine River Gossip – More over the fence…

Pine River News

Besides their interests in Longville about this time, life pretty much went on in Pine River. I am always fascinated with their movements and comings and goings.

1.  Mrs. Dawes opens a millinery store and visits her daughter in Grand Rapids, 22 April 1904.

2.  Mrs. Dawes stepped on a nail, September 1904.

3.  Mrs. Dawes and Mrs. McDonald went to Brainerd with the children, September 1904.

4. J.G. Dawes went to the Twin Cities and returned, Nov. 1904.

5. Masked ball at the Barclay Hall, masks are on sale at the Post Office, Dec. 1904.

Anyone for dancing….!!!

J.G. Dawes – Longville Days

Around 1904 or 1905 J.G. Dawes decided to expand his business interests and headed to the Longville, Minnesota area.

Hotel Dawes, Longville 1905

The book “The History of Longville, MN 1906-2006″ shares this information about J.G. Dawes and Amarilla’s involvement in the growth of Longville.

“The hustling new town was laid out on the banks of Girl Lake by J.G. Dawes of Pine River in 1904.  In the fall, he had the hotel and store building constructed by George Oleson and A.D. Fuller. He rented the hotel to Tom Nash and Frank Wetherell…In May of 1905, Wideman and Company rented Mayor Dawes new building at Longville and opened a general store.” page 17. 

On Dec. 22, 1905 a copy of the town of Longville’s first council meeting minutes was published in the Pine River Sentinel, Dec. 22, 1905.  “Mr. Dawes, in his remarks, said he could hardly realize that it was scarce three years since he purchased the property on which the village stands and which, at this time, contained only one small log hut.” page 18.

Mr. Dawes stated that he had given and option on his town site at Longville (Dec. 3, 1909). page 20. 

In July 1916, the big general store occupied by Bert Fuller was totally destroyed by fire, together with contents…This big store building was erected by J.G. Dawes in 1905.  The building was a total loss. page 20. 

J.G. Dawes received promises of an appropriation to build a road from Mule Lake to Longville, this making a completion of the mail route between Pine River and Longville. Also an appropriation for the extension of the road from Longville to Thunder Lake, bridging the narrows of Inguadona Lake. He also secured an appropriation to comment work on the road between Pine River and Pillager, with the understanding that whatever amounts were paid out from time to time, it would be divided equally at each end of the road, until it was completed…. From the Pine River Sentinel Feb. 17, 1905), page 24.

Postal service to the community of Longville was instigated in 1904 by James A. Long. Jefferson G. Dawes was confirmed as Longville’s first postmaster on April 11, 1904 [to about October 5, 1905], page 173.

J.D. Dawes hired Albert Daniel Fuller, James Bert Fuller, and George Oleson to build the Hotel Dawes in 1904 on Lots 19, 20 and 21 in Block 5.  It was a two-story building with a large kitchen and dining room and eight sleeping rooms upstairs, page 213.  It looks like about 1908 Dawes must have sold the hotel. 

The land for the Longville School was purchased from Amarilla and J.G. Dawes for $1.00 in September 1905. , pg. 387.”

Apparently J.G. saw opportunity in the Longville area and built his hotel which required postal service but I think by about 1908 he had moved on.  When I did my research I was concentrating on Amarilla and George’s land transactions, it might be interesting to see how many deeds J.G. was involved with.