Heirs of Alexander Barclay: Sarah Agnes Barclay Blinn

Sarah Agnes Barclay has also given me trouble.  I thought I had her in Connecticut married to a Porter Blinn but discovered, when I was in Connecticut in 2011, that it was a Sarah Grissom who married Porter Blinn. This is an example of checking other records like marriages and not just relying on census. The Sarah Agnes Barclay Blinn I wanted married a James Blinn.  As you read the information below you will see that Sarah is still giving me trouble.

In Salt Lake City, in October 2014, I found a birth record for an unnamed baby. The parents were Jas. B. Blinn and Sarah A. Barclay Blinn. The baby was born 29, June 1868 in Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut. FHL#1313829.

Birth Record child of Sarah and James.

Birth Record child of Sarah and James.

June 29, ____ Blinn, Male, Jas, B. & Sarah A. Barclay Blinn, father 41, mother 22, 121 Park Street, Occupation of the father [M/Woulder] W. H. Tremaine, physician. Mother’s occupation Bonnet Maker.

Update 6/10/2016 – I just recently found them in the 1870 Census.  They are living in Bridgeport, Connecticut:

line 27, They are under house 1708 of a Dolph, Edwin L.  2531, Blinn, James B, 40, M, W, Iron Moulder, $150, born Connecticut, his parents are of foreign birth

Blinn, Sarah, A, 28, F, W, domestic _____, born Conn. parents of foreign birth. 

Blinn, Anna E, 8/12 F, W. 

Source:  1870 U.S. Federal Census, James Blinn Family, page 312, Bridgeport, County of Fairfield, Connecticut, enumerated the 26th day of July, 1870 by a Philo L. Bainerd. 

The 1880 Connecticut Census has a James with a Sarah A. which might be them but the ages do not match the birth record above?

Line 28, 1751/2, 19, 30 Blinn, James B. W, M, 52, Iron Maulder, born Connecticut, parents born Ireland.

Blinn, Sarah A. W, F, 33, Wife, Hair worker, born Connecticut, father born England, mother born Scotland. 

Blinn, Rex E., W, M, 8, son, at school, born Connecticut, parents born Connecticut.

Blinn, Olive May, W, F, 3, daughter, at school, born Connecticut, parents born Connecticut. 

 Source: James Blinn Family, Hartford, Hartford Co., Connecticut, page 3, SD#2, ED#4, enumerated 1 of June 1880, by J. McConville. 

Sarah Agnes Blinn witnesses a deed between Grace and Amarilla in 1899 in August.  I have featured this deed in a previous post on this blog regarding George A. Barclay’s estate, in Pine River. See the post dated March 24, 2014 titled: “Final Decree Aug. 15, 1899 – George’s Legacy.”  I am glad Grace got to meet more of her father’s siblings.  I think of all the lost stories of this family, sigh!

Update 6/10/2016 – I no longer feel that this is Sarah it just doesn’t work.  In the 1900 Census we find Sarah with a daughter in California.

Line 84, 426, 55, 103, Blinn/Blum, Sarah, Head, W, F, June 1834, 65 Wd, 2 children born, 2 died. Born in Scotland, Immigrated 1851, 49 years in U.S., no occupation. 

Blum, Louisa, daughter, W, F, Nov. 1853, age 46, S, born California, father born Sweden, mother Scotland, no occupation

Source: 1900 U.S. Federal Census for Sarah Blum, San Francisco, San Francisco Co., California, SD# 1, ED 306, Sht 4, Assembly Dist. No. 45, enumerated on the 4th day of June 1900, by Joseph A. Gendoth. 

If this is Sarah Agnes Barclay Blinn then I find her birth date very interesting and the fact she immigrated in 1851 also very interesting.  Her daughter Louise is very confusing with the age 46 and the birth 1853?

1910 U.S. Census Seattle, King County, Washington we find them under the name Blain. Update 6/10/2016 – The only thing that bothers me is that she is said to be born in PA and I think that is not correct.  So this is where things get tricky.

Line 96, 24th Avenue, 46, 56, Blain, Sarah A., head, F, W, 60 Wd, 5 children born 2 living, born Pennsylvania, Scot – Engl, Eng. English, Income, yes, yes. 

Leola M. daughter, F, W, 33, D, 0 0, Born Pennsylvania, Father born New Jersey, mother born PA, English, Clerk, Abstract Office, W, No. O, yes, yes.

Source:  Sarah Blain Family, 1910 Seattle, King County, Washington 11th Precinct part of, SD#1, ED#93, Ward 3 Part of), Sht#2, enumerated 16 April 1910, by T/F. W. Van Allen. Blain, 

In 1920 Sarah is living in an insane asylum and probably has suffered the same fate as Alexander who was found wandering Farmington before his death and ended up in the Rochester Hospital in Olmsted Co., Minnesota.  It is very interesting that her parents are born in New York?

Line 65, Blinn, Sarah A, F, W, 69, WD, yes, yes, born Connecticut, father born New York, mother born New York, yes,, no occupation. 

Source:  1920 U.S. Federal Census, Napa State Hospital, Napa, California, Juarez Precinct, SD#3, ED# 56, Sht.#16, enumerated 14 January 1920, by John K. Harries.

The information provided below may or may not be the correct family, there is a tombstone at Find A Grave in the Sunset View Cemetery in Contra Costa, California, for a Sarah A. Blinn with the appropriate dates. She is listed as the Mother of Leola M. Kellogg but I don’t know or can’t find a Leola Kellogg marriage record:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Blinn&GSfn=Sarah&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=137683492&df=all&

Daughter Leola Mae may have married first an Alexander Buck and lived in Contra Costa but based on the above, I am not sure.

Line 71, 423, 433, Buck, Alexander, Head, M,W, 35 M, yes, yes, born PA, parents born PA. yes, truck_____Contractor. 

Buck, Leola Mae, F, W, 34, M, yes, yes, born Connecticut, parents born Connecticut, none. 

Source:  Alexander Buck Family, 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Contra Costa, California, 7th Township, SD#3, ED#17, Sht.#18, enumerated 31, January 1920, by Claire W. Schmidt. 

By 1930 they have moved to Placer, California.

Line 92, 178, 198, Buck, Alexander, yes, M, W, 45, M, 21, no, yes, born Connecticut, parents born Connecticut, 55, yes, rancher, fruit ranch

Buck, Leola, F, W, 44, M, 21, no, yes, born Connecticut, parents born Connecticut

Buck, Sarah, daughter, F, W, 8, S, yes, yes, born Connecticut, parents born, Connecticut, rancher, fruit ranch. 

Source:  Alexander Buck, 1930 U.S. Federal Census, Placer, California, township 14, ED# 31-27, SD4, Sht#7, enumerated on 22, April, 1930 by Matthew W. Coates.

Sarah J. Buck was born 4 January 1922 in Placer and her mother’s maiden name was Blinn.

1940 we find Alexander with a May in Placer.

Line 41, 141, O, 200, No, Buck, Alexander E. Head, M, W, 55, M, No, 8, born PA, Same house, Farmer. Buck, May, Wife, F, W, 56, M, No, 8, born PA, County Clinton, State PA, no occupation.

Source: Alexander Buck Family, Placer County, California, Judicial 10, SD#2, ED#31-21, Sht 7, enumerated on 22 April, 1940, by Eldon R. Martinson. 

It looks like Alexander Buck died on 20 November 1970 in Placer, California and was born 21 December 1884 per the California Death Index.

Update 6/10/2016:  About two weeks ago a lady from MOHAI contacted me with an article about a Leola Mae Blinn who was an attorney in the Seattle, Washington area.  MOHAI is the Museum of History and Industry here in Seattle.  So I started to doublecheck everything and found the 1870 census for James and Sarah A. Blinn.  I am still having trouble verifying the death of James and finding out more about Sarah.

This article from the MOHAI individual had a photo from a city directory for a Leola May Blinn as an attorney.

Leola May Blinn

Leola May Blinn

The article was from the Urbana Daily Courier Tuesday December 12, 1916 – Woman Motorists Drive off Wolves, Their Only Weapons Were Firebrands and Hatchet — An All-night Battle.  Seattle, Wash. Forced to use firebrands, their only weapon aside from a hatchet, to drive away the timber wolves and coyotes that surrounded their machine at night, three Seattle women fund excitement aplenty on the last leg of an 8000 automobile journey across the continent. The women, Miss Leola May Blinn, her mother, Mrs. Sarah Blinn, aged 70, and Mrs. Charles S. Davis, traveled alone, without even a gun to protect themselves. They slept ou in the open. Miss Blinn’s automobile being converted at night into a sleeping car. “It was when we got stuck in eastern Washington that we suffered out most harrowing experience,” said Miss Blinn, describing the events of the journey. “We had just been ferried across the river at Walla Walla to Wallula when we ran into poor roads. From there to North Yakima we had a terrible time. We managed the difficult sand piles that served for roads until we were making a forced detour around the ‘Old Horn,’ a bend in the Columbia River. Then we got stuck in the sand.  “We were miles from nowhere. Night came on. We had trouble with our battery and could not switch on the electric lights We could not go ahead nor could we go back. While we sat their the coyotes and timber wolves came. We had no gun. There was nothing but a hatchet. “We had built a fire, however, with the safe brush that was near, and with the firebrands were able to keep them off. The Coyotes were afflicted with rabies, the weather having been very hot, and the wolves came right up to the machine and almost put their noses inside. We stayed up all night. Early the next morning I started out for assistance. While I was away Mrs. Davis had to use firebrands again to keep off the coyotes who had reappeared. Then she became anxious for my safety, not knowing whether I would be able to find assistance or not. I was able, however, to arouse two white men in a tent a mile away and with their help we got out of the North Yakima flats.”

I know that Sarah Agnes Blinn was in Seattle in 1906 helping her niece and nephew with affidavits about their father’s disappearance in Alexander’s estate papers.  So this is very interesting.

I did manage to find an obituary about a Leola M. Kellogg but I don’t know what paper it is from only that it was done sometime in 1959:

Mrs. Leola B. Kellogg, Criminal Lawyer, Dies – Mrs. Leola Buck Kellogg, 82, a criminal lawyer for 40 years, died, Monday at Harbor General Hospital, where she was taken after being stricken at her Redondo Beach home. She lived at 1927 Gates Ave. North Redondo Beach.  Mrs. Kellogg was born in Hartford, Conn. She was graduated from law school at George Washington University, Washington D.C., and later attended the New York School of Dramatic Art. After a brief career as an actress in the Boston stock company and at the Knickerbocker Theater, New York, she went to Seattle where she was admitted to the bar in 1912.  Mrs. Kellogg was admitted to the California bar in 1919 and had specialized in criminal law in Los Angeles since then, acting as defense counsel in 18 murder trials in this area. She maintained offices at 122 S. Pacific Ave. Redondo Beach, and appeared in Redondo Beach Municipal Court as recently as March 3. Funeral services will be conducted at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Niland Mortuary Chapel, 535 N. Pacific Coast Highway, Redondo Beach and interment will be at Pacific Crest Cemetery. Mrs. Kellogg leaves a daughter, Mrs. Sarah Jane von Dyl of Encino, and five grandchildren. 

This obituary about Leola May Kellogg explains the notate on the tombstone that I found for Sarah A. Blinn, see above link to Find A Grave.  It also explains why I was finding articles about Leola in the Seattle newspapers which stopped about 1920.  I am going to summarize these articles here:

The Seattle Sunday Times, Oct. 27, 1912 – Miss Blinn Active in Republican Campaign – Feminine Lawyer Who Made Great Race for State Office, Heads Women’s auxiliary. With Photo. Miss Leola May Blinn, who ran third in the race for commissioner of public lands and who was the only woman admitted to the practice of law at the last state bar examination has been made chairman of the King County Republican committee’s women’s auxiliary. Miss Blinn is in charge of the women’s headquarters in the Seattle Hotel. Miss Blinn made a remarkable race for land commissioner, spending most of her time at her desk in the county clerk’s office while the campaign was in progress and devoting odd moments to her own canvas. As she is a good automobile driver she was able, in spare time, to make quick runs to nearby points and covered a great deal of the state in short trip expeditions. She introduced into politics an innovation — the woman campaign manager — who accompanied her on all her trips. Immediately after the close of the campaign, Miss Blinn appeared before the bar examining board and passed one of the most rigid bar examinations ever submitted to students. It is her ambition to devote herself to law practice in probate and realty matters, having had seven years’ experience in abstract work and having become familiar with probate business through her experience in the county clerk’s office. Miss Blinn is a member of the Women’s Relief Corps and several other organizations. She was born in Hartford, Conn. and now resides with her mother, at 1833 Twenty-fourth Avenue. 

The Seattle Republican Friday Jan. 17, 1913 – Leola May Blinn ….first woman to be admitted to practice in the U.S. court in this district. 

The Seattle Star, Wed, May 21, 1912 First Edition – Women Attorneys are Opposed in Man’s Trial. About a burglary case in which Miss Blinn and Miss Reah Whitehead argued the case.

The Labor Journal (Everett, WA) Fri, Feb 7, 1913 – First Edition – Women Form State Body. She held several positions in the creation of the organization.

The Labor Journal (Everett, WA) Fri Aug 14, 1914 – First Edition page 3 with photo – Woman Lawyer to Aid Paroled Prisoner. 

The Newport Miner (Newport, WA) Thu, Aug 8, 1912 – First Edition page 6, Woman Candidate Files – Her move to run for land commissioner is filed.

The Oregon Daily Journal (Portland, OR) Tue, Aug 24, 1915 – page 13 – Woman Lawyer at Joint Meeting. Miss Leola May Blinn of Seattle is the only woman lawyer from Washington attending the joint meeting of the Washington Oregon and Bar Association….sort of a quick bio of her.  

The Seattle Sunday Times, Nov. 11, 1917 She appears with a photo, About her Relief Corp work.

There is a Find A Grave memorial, with no gravestone at this time, to Leola. They use the name Leola Buck Kellogg, born Aug. 29, 1876 and died May 11, 1956.  She is buried in the Pacific Crest Cemetery in Redondo Beach, Los Angeles Co., California. Plot 4 563 5.  Billion Graves has a tombstone photo for her that reads: Beloved Mother, Leola B. Kellogg 1876 to 1959.  There are other Kelloggs buried in the Pacific Crest:  Daisy Evans, Emmer Edward and Michael.  I did not find her husband.

The SSDI Applications and Claims Index has a Sarah Jane Vondyl (Sarah Jane Von Dyl) who was born 4 Jan 1922 in Auburn Place, CA and she died 16 Dec. 2006. Her father is listed as Alexander E. Buck and her mother is Leola M. Blinn.  So this means that Leola M. Blinn did marry to Alexander Buck.

I found a marriage in Skagit County, Washington on 5th September, 1917 in Mt. Vernon by a Baptist Minister. Alexander E. buck of King and Leola May Blinn of King.  Witnesses were Edna M. Behrens and Mrs. J.E. Noflsinger. Rev. Noflsinger was the officiating minister. Pastor of the Davis Memorial Baptist Church in Mt. Vernon.  So by 1920 they were in California.

According to the SSDI He, Alexander Buck, was born 21 December, 1884 and died Nov. 1970 in California in Contra Costa.  This means they must have divorced because he died 11 years after Leola died and she was Kellogg by that time.

I found two references to court cases one took place 6 December 1940.  Where a Leola M. Kellogg applied for Habeas Corpus.  The petitioner, who is the wife of William V. Kellogg, was charged with grand theft accomplished by means of drawing and cashing six checks upon the alleged joint tenancy account of herself and her husband at the Bank of America in Sacramento and by appropriating the money to her own use contrary to her trust. etc.  This case goes on for 10 pages. Justia – US Law, Case Law, California Case Law Cal App 2d Volume 41 in reg Kellogg.

Collison v. Thomas, Docket No. L.A. 25793, 55 Cal 2d 490 (1961) – This litigation involves the estates of William P. O’Brien his wife Masie O’Brien..Edna M. Collison, as administratrix of Masie’s estate…Leola Buck Kellogg was administratrix of William’s estate to quiet title on land in Torrance, CA.  Unfortunately Leola died during the trial etc.  The entire trail of this action took less than one day. It commenced at 11:05 a.m. on May 11, 1959, Mrs. Kellogg, the administratrix of William’s estate died at 11:20 a.m. on the day of the trial.  This brief was 4 pages long. 

An article appeared titled “Woman Charges Husband Ruined Law Business, Los Angeles, Sep. 17, UP Mrs. Leola M. Kellogg, former Sacramento attorney, today filed suit asking $15,250 damages from her husband, William V. Kellogg of Sacramento, charging that he ruined her law business by causing her prosecution on grand theft charges. Mrs. Kellogg said her husband swore to a complaint Sept 12, 1940, which caused her arrest and trial in Sacramento. She said she was acquitted in a jury trial but that her practice was destroyed. Her husband, she said, was “malicious” in his action, which was described as the outgrowth of a dispute over funds in a joint bank account. 

I have not found a marriage record for Leola to William V. Kellogg at this time.  I cannot get a fix on him although he may have died in Denver, CO.

End of update 6/10/2016  – Well if this is Sarah’s daughter Leola must have been someone to know.  Maybe some day I will figure this out. It looks very much like it could be Sarah’s family.

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I find that the Barclay’s were very inconsistent with their census information.  I am using census again without other documents like vital records to verify, so the information above is all very uncertain till I get time to dig more.

There is certainly more to do with Sarah Agnes and her family like finding her marriage record and when did James pass. How many children did she actually have?  Did I find the correct Sarah in the census or am mistaken.  I need to look at vital records and more to see if I cannot get a clearer picture of Sarah Agnes Barclay Blinn.

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Heirs of Alexander Barclay: James Barclay, a brother…

James A. Barclay, an heir of his brother Alexander, has given me quite a bit of trouble.  I have tried to learn more about him but it has been difficult and he remains a mystery.

I estimate he was born about 1838 and he died in early 1906 in Bridgeport, Connecticut but the census that I have collected varies from 1838 to 1852 for his birth year.  He died during the probate of Alexander’s estate sometime during 1906.

Streets & Trips - Connecticut

Streets & Trips – Connecticut

This is from the listing of heirs in Alexander’s estate:

 “James A. Barclay, aged 68 years, residing at 1444 Stratford Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. who is a brother.”

There is a possibility that James is in the 1850 U.S. census for Connecticut but I do not know for sure if it is him.

Source: 1850 U.S. Federal Census for Litchfield, Hartford, Connecticut, 30 July 1850 – Ancestry.com

Line 29, Dwelling 131, Family 144 Joshua D. Berry age 40 male, Epis Clergyman 120.00 born NH, Jane Berry age 28, F born Ct., James Barclay age 12 male, born Ireland.

The fact that he is born in Ireland could be a mistake instead of Scotland.  The other possibility is the family went to Ireland and then to the US. The age is right for James Barclay, John’s son and George and Alex’s older brother. The location is a bit farther from the rest of the other scattered children of John Barclay and Margaret.

However, the next time I find James Barclay is in the 1870 U.S. Federal Census for Southington, Hartford, Connecticut. He is living with his sister Mary J. Ford. He is 21 in this census which means he was born in 1849?

Line 27, 493 – Living with Ely, Adolph, 583 Ford, Jerome B., 24, M, W, Laborer all born Connecticut, 11, Jan. Ford Mary 27 F, W, Keeping House, Ford Rosaliee, 3, F, W. Barclay, James, 21, M, W, Laborer. 

Source: Jerome Ford Family, 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Southington, Hartford Co., Connecticut, pg. 65, enumerated 29 June 1870, Deenis P. Farch. 

Note:  Litchfield is northwest of Bristol and Southington is south of Bristol.  Mary and Jerome settled in Bristol later on.

Backing up in the census to 1860 there is a James Barclay living with a family in East Windsor by the name of William Cains.  This James is 12 years old born in Connecticut but they have him listed as Irish.  He is in East Windsor which is closer to other Barclay siblings.

In 1880 there is a James Barclay age 28 which means he was born 1852 and that is very different from my date of 1838.  He is with a Mary J. and Albert 8/12 yrs. He is a working in a clock shop.  In 1900 I have a Jam Barcley (50 yrs) living with a Mary J. and an mother-in-law Elizabeth Phelps.  He states he was born in Connecticut but his parents were born in New York and he is now a baker?   The following information maybe incorrect based on the census above but I have that James married a Maryanne Stewart? Well you can see that I am having trouble pinning James down.

When I visited Connecticut in May of 2011 I went back to the Connecticut State Library and I studied the probate records for Bridgeport, Connecticut but I could not find a probate for James Barclay.  I studied Film #1428182 but found the V. 113, 115, 116 and 118 and 119 missing for the time period I needed for James.  I even went an ordered the probate index.  They had me move to the special collections area of the library to view it. I did not have any luck figuring it out. James name was just not appearing in the records, nor where any Barclay’s in the records for Bristol in 1905, 1906 and 1907.  I will probably have to go directly to the Bridgeport courthouse to seek out my answers at some point.

At the time of Alexander’s probate process James was divorced and there was a little concern about the distribution of the funds by another sister Martha W. Ford written for her by her daughter Carrie Ford.  If that is him in the 1900 census he is not divorced yet?

In a letter dated June 1, 1900, Martha writes to Dr. H.N. Rogers the Administrator of Alexander’s estate from San Francisco to Dakota County,  Minnesota:

I did not know that brothers and sister of the half blood would inherit as against brothers and sisters of the whole blood.  I do not think that the widow of Jas. Barclay is entitled to enherit any portion of the estate because she was divorced long prior to the death of Alex Barclay…” she goes on to say that Mr. Rogers should do as he sees best.

James’s heirs did receive 1/10 share from Alexander’s estate. It appears that an N.B. [Girgen] was the administrator of James’ estate. I cannot read his signature to verify his name.  The file was so thick I had to put numbers on the some of the actions so this has #36 written on it.  Unfortunately, this is all the information I have about James A. Barclay.

So I have a little more digging to do with James. I have tried to find his obituary, the estate papers, his marriage and have not been successful at this time.  I also need to consider his divorce but everything is so vague about him it is difficult.

George and Alexander Barclay’s older brother John Barclay…

George Angus Barclay’s probate process was pretty easy for he had only two heirs: Amarilla, his wife, and Grace his daughter.

George’s brother Alexander didn’t marry although I suspect he did care about someone. Because Alexander remained single his heirs were his siblings and if deceased it would be their children.

In the last post I gave an overview of the eleven heirs of Alexander Barclay’s estate.  The heirs listed were the children of John Barclay and Margaret, the first marriage. and John Barclay and Ellen for the second marriage.  There would be full siblings and also half-siblings involved.  How close George or Alexander were to these other siblings I do not know.  Only a few attended John’s funeral according to his obituary. I have posted about John Barclay, the father, in this blog on many occasions if you want to review just do a search.

It is now time to share about the siblings.  I want to start with the oldest.

The oldest brother was named John Barclay.  I have his birth sometime around 1836. He may have been born earlier or later. In the census he is listed as born in Scotland.  John Barclay, the father, claims in his naturalization papers that he came to the U.S. in 1833. This would mean that the son was not born in Scotland but based on documentation you will see that this John Barclay was pretty clear about his birth country being Scotland.  This means that John Barclay the father gave the wrong information on his naturalization papers. Until this mystery of the Barclay arrival in the USA is solved the birth of the son John Barclay will be in question and for that matter all the children.

In  the post titled “John Barclay’s Two Families,” dated April 3, 2010 on this blog, I gave a summary of the children of John Barclay from each of the two marriages. In the next posts, I will share in more detail what I know about each of these individuals.

In my post “More Siblings in Connecticut 1850,” April 18, 2010 I did a study of the 1850 U.S. Connecticut census trying to identify the children of John and Margaret Barclay who were scattered around the Enfield.  The family of John and Margaret Barclay was scattered and broken in 1850.  A search of the census did not reveal John Barclay the father or anything about the mother who was said to have “died before the Civil War.” I do not pick up John’s trail till 1853 when he appears in Shakopee, Scott Co., Minnesota.  Where he was from 1833 to 1853 is not clear. The History of Enfield Connecticut reports about a John Barclay who was not paying his taxes and a Margaret who died in 1848.  There is not enough information to really prove that these are my ancestors.

John Barclay the oldest son has not been easy to find or to learn about.  I start with the 1850 U.S. Federal Census in Connecticut.

1850 Census: “A  John Bartley is living with the Olmstead family in Enfield.  The spelling is slightly different.  I have seen this spelling version of the Barclay surname before in other documents.  The family starts on line 9 with an Obadiah Olmstead age 34 male, farmer with $4000 in real estate, born in Connecticut.  He is followed by Hannah age 30, [Sauranu] age 7 female and Frederick age 4 male.  John is on line 13.  This John is 16 years old which means he was born about 1834 and born in Scotland.  John is followed by a James Boyle age 28 farmer, born in Ireland. 

This John Bartley is a strong possibility for the older brother of George and Alex.

In another post “1850 Connecticut – George and Alex,” dated April 11, 2010, I wrote about George and Alexander and the fact they were living in separate families as well.

I have spent some time trying to find out about apprenticeships in Connecticut  in the 1840’s and 1850’s.  Looking for poor houses in the area of Hartford County, Connecticut but the records are not good.  The towns would care for their poor and take families would take in children so there might be agreements but I have not had much success in finding them.  It has been frustrating.

By the 1857 Minnesota Territorial Census we find John Barclay, the father, living in Eagle Creek, Scott Co., Minnesota and George and Alexander are with him enumerated on 26 Sept 1857, by Frank Warren, pg. 326.

Line 21, 6/6 John Barclay, age 46, (born 1811) male, white, Place of birth – Scotland, naturalized, farmer. Line 22, 6/6 Alex Barclay, age 16, (1841) male, white, born in Conn. Line 23 George Barclay, age 14 (1843), male, white born in Conn.

There is no mention of John Barclay the oldest son in this census.  If I speculate, John Barclay would be 20-23 years old at this time and did he bring his two younger brothers to Minnesota or did they come by themselves. George would be about 13 years old and Alex would be 15 or 16 years old.  I have wondered how they got to Minnesota and thought it would be very interesting story.

Henderson Minnesota 2007

Henderson Minnesota 2007

In the General Index of Deeds for Sibley Co., Minnesota FHL#2294774, listed as grantee is a John Barckly.  He is buying from Grantor C.H. Drew, Recorded 12, Nov. 1858, Instrument dated 27, February 1858. Book C., pg. 557, W 1/3 of S1/3 of SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 Section 15, Twp. 112, R. 27. A copy of the deed would need to be obtained to see if it placed John in Sibley County or indicates he is listed somewhere else.

By the 1860 U.S. Federal Census we have John Barclay living in Kelso, Sibley Co., Minnesota.

277/277 John Barkley 25, Male, Farmer, $50.00 born in Scotland.

Source: 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Kelso, Sibley Co., Minnesota pg. 26, June 16, 1860, P.C. Bray. 

In the year 1864 John is on the Delinquent Tax Lists for 1865-1875 for Kelso Twp., Sibley Co., Minnesota.

Henderson Minnesota 2007

Henderson Minnesota 2007

John Barclay appears in the 1865 Minnesota State Census in Sibley Co., Minnesota.  He is family #17, male. The date of the census was 1 June 1865.  (Roll MNSC-3).

He also appears on the Tax list for 1864.

Tax. Dup. of Township Kelso, Co. of Sibley 1864, Barclay, John 105, $5.19 paid. SW LE LE L4 Sec Town or Lot 15 Block 112 Range 27 total value $30, total tax $1.48, remarks 2.11

Source:  Delinquent Tax Lists, Sibley Co., MN 1865-1875, #102.K.7.3B 2v, Henderson & Kelso.

In 1865 John Barclay marries on 3 July 1865 to Minerva Parks in Henderson, Sibley Co., Minnesota.

Source:  Marriage Records, 1865-1952, Marriage Record Index 1865-1992, Barclay & Parks, 1865, Item 2, Box 1, Book A, page. 17, FHL#2295484. 

State of Minnesota, District Court for the County of Sibley, To any persons lawfully authoried to Solomize marriage within said state. Know ye that license is hereby granted to join together a husband and wife. John Barclay of the County of Sibley, State of Minnesota and Minerva Parks of the County of Sibley and State of Minnesota. Being satisfied by the affidavit of A. D. Parks and [Lovina] Parks parents of the said Minerva Parks that there is no legal impediment thereto. Therefore this shall be your sufficient authority for solemizing the marriage of said parties and making return thereof as provided by law. etc. Signed by M.B. Wilcox clerk July 3, 1865.

The Public Library of Henderson, Minnesota

The Public Library of Henderson, Minnesota

From this information we know that Minerva was the daughter of Avery D. Parks and Lavisa (Lovina).  Minerva had siblings:  Allen (1852) Pascal (1854), Amy (1857), Iseral (1859).

Source: Family of Avery D. Parks – 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Tuscarora, Steuben Co., New York, pg. 87, enumerated on the 30th of July 1860.  

Avery D.  Parks is also listed in the 1865 Minnesota State Census along with Louirie, Minerva, Allen, Pascal, Israel, Rhoda, Renaldo. Also a Miner R. Parks with Susan and Andrew follow as a family group. 

John and Minerva (Parks) Barclay had 4 children:

1.  John Avery Barclay (1867 to 1951). He will be featured in a future post and also his sister.

2. Sarah Ellen Barclay (1869 to 1957)

3. Albert Barclay (born 29 March 1870 died 24 August 1874) a twin.

4. Alice Barclay (born 29 March 1870 to ________) a twin

Source:  Township Birth Records, 1864-1887, Sibley Co., Minnesota, Kelso Twp., FHL#2365687.

#3 March 29, 1870 Albert Barclay, Male Twin, White, Town or City: Sibley, Father John Barclay, born in Scotland, Farmer, Registered Dec 10. #4 Alice Barclay, Female Twin, White, Town or City: Sibley, Mother Minerva Barclay, born in Pennsylvania, Registered Dec 10.

Albert died 24 Aug. 1874 in San Francisco, San Francisco Co., California according to funeral home records.

Albert Barclay, burial, 24 Aug, 1874, San Francisco, San Francisco Co., California, age 3, born Minnesota, death 1874, est. birth year 1871, N. Gray & Co. Funeral Home Records. 

Unfortunately, troubles were still plaguing John Barclay in 1867 he gets arrested for allegedly stealing hay.

Source:  Silbey Co., Minnesota Civil and Criminal Case Files, State of Minnesota, Co. of Silbey v. John Barclay, Case #1505, Minnesota Historical File 131.E.3.8F Box 8.

There are documents in this file as follows:
1. No. 1505 District Court 8th Judicial District, Sibley Co., Minnesota vs. John Barclay, Summons to trial for William T. Barnes, Arnold Selger, Moses Pellier, C. H. Delger, Daniel McGuen and Oliver Pelkey. To a home on the 8th day of Feb. 1867 at 9 am Sunday in the Town of Kelso at the home of Sylvester Rice for the trial of John Barclay.
2. Court expenses For $1.65 dated Feb 27, 1867
3. Sheriff Summons to arrest John Barkley for the stealing of 4 loads of hay, dated 6th day of Feb 1867 signed by the Justice of the Peace Eben. M. Gordon.
4. Further expenses $3.05, filed Feb 27, 1867.
5. Formal printed with handwritting subpoena, dated 6 Feb. 1867, Eben. M. Gordon, Jof Peace for Sylvester Rice, A.D. Parkes, George Grant, Allen Parkes, Pascha Parkes.
6. Justice’s return – summary of the trial at the home of Sylvester Rice – John Barclay was convicted of stealing 4 loads of hay that was owned by David Adams. John Barkley to pay a fine of $30.00 by 9th day of Feb. and he will be imprisoned in the common jail of the county if the said fine is not paid. Signed 9th day of Feb by Mr. Gordon JP. Judge Austin decided that the court had not final jurisdiction and had John taken by the sheriff and he was to appear the 2nd of April 1867 in Henderson.
7. Court expenses listed total of $6.05 Feb 27, 1867.
8. Complaint of Daniel Adams that John Barkley had stolen 4 loads of hay from him Feb 6th 1867 and that John Barkley would be arrested. Signed by Mr. Gordon, JP.
9. List of the jurors: Wm. F. Barnes, Arnold Delger, Moses Peltier, H.C. Delger, Daniel McGuen, Oliver Peltier and witnesses Daniel Adams, Sylvester Rice, A.D. Parkes, Allen Parks and George Grant.
10. Recognizance – John Barkley and others to appear in April 1867 at court in Henderson.

This might be the resolution of the above court case?

H. Loehler vs. S. R. Andrews & John Barclay – Amount of Judgement $49.18. costs $16.60 amount to $65.78. Amount received $7.65 balance due $58.13. , Recorded Nov. 7, 1867. M. R. Wilson, Clerk. Judgment satisfied by S. R. Andrews one of the defendants. S. R. Andrews is discharged for all liabilities. Paid $29.06. T. Barnes & _____ Grant garnished.

Source:  Judgement Books 1864 to 1988, Vol. A pg. 1 & B 1875-1883 #118 G.18 1B-1, H. Loehler vs. S. R. Andrews & John Barclay, Dec. 26, 1866-1867 #1505

Source:  1870 U.S. Federal Census, Sibley Co., Minnesota, page 2, 17 June 1870

Line 12, 11, Barkley, John, 35, M, W, Farmer, $1500, $500, Scotland, parents of foreign birth, male citizen. Barkley, Norva, 21, F, W, keeping house, born PA. Barkley, Abraham, 4, M. W, born Minnesota father of foreign birth, Barkley, Ellen, 2, F, W, born Minnesota, father of foreign birth, Allis, 2/12, M, W., father of foreign birth, Apr. 

Source: 1870  U.S. Federal Census and Agricultural, Sibley Co., Minnesota, page 1, line 12. John Barckly, two pages. 

Improved: 25
Woodland: 10
Unimproved: 135
Present Value of Farm: 1200
Value of Farming Implements/Machinery: 100
Wages paid:  20
Milch cows: 2
Working Oxen: 4
Value of all livestock: 200
Wheat Spring:  180
Indian Corn: 100
Oats: 300,
Irish Potatoes: 35,
Butter: 200,
Hay: 24,
Animals Sold/Slaughtered: 150,
Estimated Value of Farm production etc.: 550

 In 1871 John is delinquent on his taxes again.

Tax Duplicate of Real Property in Twp. of Kelso, Co. of Sibley, Minn – 1871 Jan 11, J. Barclay

SW LE LE L4 Sec Town or Lot 15 Block 112 Range 27 total value $30, total tax $1.48, remarks 2.11

Source:  Delinquent Tax Lists, Sibley Co., MN 1865-1875, #102.K.7.3B 2v, Henderson & Kelso.

Deed Index for Sibley Co., Minnesota in 1871 lists the following:

Grantor John Barclay and Wife, Grantee August Spannams, Instrument date 11 January 1871, Recorded 18 January, 1871. Book J/G pg. 536 – the NE1/4 Section 26, Twp. 112_28 & W1/2 S1/2 of SE 1/4 of SE 1/4, Section 15, Twp 112, R. 27, 170 acres. Copy not made.

There is a patent #1383, Application 1409, Issued 25 March 1872 in New Ulm to a John Barclay, NE, Sec 26, Twp. 112-N, Range 28-W, 5th Meridian, State MN, County Sibley.  MN1310_.261 BLM MN NO S/N.  Here is a link to his patent at the BLM:

http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=MN1310__.261&docClass=STA&sid=joquca5t.bjk

Some time about 1871-1872 John Barclay left Sibley Co., Minnesota and headed to San Francisco with his family.

Note:  I cannot claim that I did all the research on this family.  My cousin a descendant of one of the children, John Avery Barclay, has provided me with clues and documents to aid in figuring out what happened to this family and I am grateful.

The Murder Investigation regarding the Death of George A. Barclay?

We must remember that back in 1898 in a local area like Pine River it was not easy to investigate a crime or a death.

The steps are very complicated in murder investigations today.

Here is a much more detailed explanation of a murder investigation, I am sure there are better websites to consult but it will do.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-involved-in-criminal-murder-investigations.htm

A familiar figure of the times!

A familiar figure of the times!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherlock_Holmes

So if we take and compare the murder of my great-grandfather George A. Barclay to the standards of today’s murder investigations we see that there are a lot of discrepancies. I confess that I am a big crime scene fan (CSI), but drama is not reality.  I am going to jump in and take some of the steps in the above link and share my thoughts below regarding George’s murder based on the documentation that I have found.  If only Sherlock Holmes could help?

1.  The murder is reported by someone who comes across the victim.  That person is asked to remain on site.  

In this murder case there are many people who witnessed the actual event and were nearby who heard the gunshot.

The news of the crime occurred when the railroad office was contacted requesting medical help for George Barclay.  This was described in the “Cold Blooded Murder,” article which I featured in my post dated November 28, 2013 titled:  Cold Blood Murder and Cowardly Crime, November 1898.   I will be referring to those two articles a great deal so you might want to go and read them.

“A telegram was immediately sent to General Manager Hear, of the B.& N. M. for a special train with  medical assistance, but before this could be procured a second message was received saying that he had passed away.”

2.  Verification of death of the victim by paramedics or coroner

Someone apparently knew how to determine if an individual had died.  It was not made apparent who that was in the records.  The nature of the wound and the number of witnesses was probably sufficient. Although each witness had their version of the actual death.  Some indicated that George died quickly and others said he lingered for up to 30 minutes.  The time of death was given as 7:10 pm and I have seen 7:30 pm given.  I have also seen the day mixed up.

I am going for this:  Time of death was given at 7:10 to 7:30 pm, October 29, 1898.

3. The scene is turned over to law enforcement. 

It is not clear that the scene was turned over to law enforcement.  A newspaper tidbit reported that:

On November 3, 1898 in the Cass County Pioneer  (Vol. 5, #42, p. 8, col.)

“B.F. Hartshorn and Geo. Hardy went to Pine River to look into the facts concerning the murder of Mr. Geo. Barclay.

B.F. Hartshorn was the Cass County Attorney and Public Prosecutor  (1897 to 1903 Cass County History).  Geo. Hardy was the sheriff at the time (1897 to 1905 Cass County History).  Both of these men will be involved up till the trial.

3.  An officer is put in charge of the investigation

Again this is not made clear in the transcripts as to what law enforcement officer was conducting an investigation. Frank Breese, Deputy-Sheriff was at the Coroner’s inquest to give testimony regarding the bullet that killed George.

4.  The scene is secured to prevent contamination of the evidence.  

With all the witnesses and people coming and going that night at Barclay’s I doubt that the scene was secured at all.  As for contamination that happened immediately.  In the testimony at the Coroner’s Inquest several people were reported as touching the body.  I am sure in the confusion, chairs were moved around.

5.  The murder scene is observed and documents with photographs taken.

Photography was not like we have today with digital cameras and instant recording of events.  It is not clear to me who observed the crime scene. I am assuming Mr. Sundberg the Justice of the Peace and Acting Coroner did a walk through along with the jury members, maybe Hartshorn and Hardy were there?

6.  Evidence is collected and bagged and sent to the crime lab. 

In the next post I  In a future post, I will review the evidence that was collected.  In this case we have the body as evidence and the area around it, the bullet, the post where it logged, the scene of the crime, the hole in the window and glass on the floor, the location from where the gun was fired, witness accounts and their guns, and more.

7.  The body is first removed and taken to the coroner’s office for autopsy.  

This was not done until the inquest was over and even then I do not see any evidence of an autopsy performed. George’s body remained where it had crumpled till the Coroner’s inquest was completed. A Mr. E. F. Lynch who resided at Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota was an undertaker for D.M. Clark & Co.  He was called upon to prepare the body of Mr. Barclay for burial.  He testifies in what appears to be the Grand Jury proceedings.

7.  People are interviewed who were involved with the murder or nearby when the murder occurred.  

There are many witnesses that gave testimony at the Coroner’s Inquest.  I cannot tell if anyone else did any interviewing of the witnesses other than at the Coroner’s Inquest.

=============================

The Cass County Historical Society published a book in 2010 titled:

Murder and Mayhem, True Crime Accounts Cass County 1897-1938

The authors collected documentation from many sources and they feature right at the very beginning the George Barclay Murder in Pine River in 1898, pages 1 to 24.  There are many other names and cases discussed in this book.  A copy may be obtained from the Cass County Historical Society for about $25.00.   http://www.casscountymuseum.org/publications.html

In this book you will find a pretty good coverage of the sources that were generated regarding the murder of George Angus Barclay.  Since they probably had a space issue they were unable to publish all of the information so you have to keep in mind that it is not totally complete. I have most of what they share in this publication and they have other items I do not have which add to the story.

At the beginning of the section on George Barclay there is in introduction taken from the book Logsleds to Snowmobiles: A Centennial History of Pine River, Minnesota (1873-1973), Pine River Centennial Committee, 1979.  I would like to caution you that there are mistakes in this introduction.  The purpose of this blog was to correct those errors.  They state he was killed in the lobby, well there seems to be other information stating it was the saloon area of the hotel. Since there is no floor plan available it is difficult to be clear. First, George was more likely born in Enfield, CT not New Jersey, although I have not yet proved it.  I have shared in past posts about George’s earlier years and the census places George and his siblings scattered in the Connecticut area around Enfield and Hartford. Alexander and a sister Mary, older siblings, state they were born in Hartford and Enfield respectively.  This sort of  places a damper on being born in Scotland.  His father John Barclay in his Naturalization papers says he came to the United States in 1833.  I have posted about this event. However, George and his brother Alexander did not enlist together in the Civil War.  George waited a full year before he enlisted.  Alexander was older by two years.  I have all of their Civil War Service Records and pensions and I have thoroughly shared them in this blog.  Again, George did not march with Sherman to the sea, his brother Alexander was the one who did. No where in George’s Civil War Service or Pension record which I have shared on this blog does it say that he was with Sherman.  However, Alexander’s Civil War documents do state this fact. I mapped out their company records so you can see from those maps that they were going in separate directions.  Now granted those company records may only cover the main events.  Individual soldiers could be sent where ever they were needed.  I have shared the article from the Northwest Magazine and the mention that George had 840 acres but I am not convinced.  I will tally it someday in the future and see if it matches.   Oh and on page 23 Amarilla married George Urton in 1922 and this is not correct she married him in 1919 but I will get to posting on their marriage later.

1895 State Census – The Barclays

George, Amarilla and their daughter Grace are featured in the 1895 census for Minnesota.  The 1880 U.S. Federal Census was rather vague and the 1885 spelled names wrong so this 1895 census was the only one that showed them together as a family.  I have posted about George the census in past posts.

A portion of that 1895 Minnesota State Census for Pine River

A portion of that 1895 Minnesota State Census for Pine River

Here is the 1895 Minnesota census:

Line 13, Barclay Geo. A, age 51, born in Conn., occupation [Lumberman], 12, sold, no, no, no. Barclay, Ammarilla, 37 years born in Iowa. Barclay, Grace A., 13 years born in Minn. 

 Source:  Geo. Barclay Family, 1895 Minnesota State Census, Twp. 137 Range 29W, Cass Co., Minnesota, Schedule 13 pg. 1,  FHL #0565765.  

When I went to source this census, I had a bit of a fright because the actual page looks like Twp. 127 rather than Twp. 137.  I therefore went to Family Search and double checked the film number to make sure I was not wrong.  I am happy to report that I am now correct with both FHL and Ancestry.   When I first started doing genealogy I was not very good at sourcing so a lot of the older research needs updating.  I do remember looking at the film for this particular census and probably doing that research at the Minnesota Historical Society at that time using film.

George’s brother Alexander Barclay was living in Dakota County.  Let’s see what was happening with Alex

6th line down: Barklay, Alexander A. 52 years, Male, White, born Conn. 40 years in area, 4 years?, farmer, 12, sold, yes, yes, yes.

Below him is Giles, Fannie B. 73 years old, female, white, born Mass, housekeepr, 12, no, no, no.

Source:  1895 Minnesota State Census, page 3, Lakeville Twp., Dakota Co., Minnesota, P.O. Farmington.

His father John Barclay was still living in Scott County with his wife Ellen/Helen and son Charlie

Family #54:  Barclay, John, age 94, male, white, born in Scotland, Resident of state 45 years, 45 years in enumeration district, occupation none, mother and father both of foreign birth.  Barclay, Ellen, age 65, female, white, born in Norway, both parents of foreign birth.  Barclay Charlie, age 35, male, white, born in Minnesota.  In state and enumeration district 35 years, a farmer, employed 12 mos of the year.  Both parents of foreign birth.

Source: 1895 Minnesota State Census, Eagle Creek, Scott Co., Minnesota, pg. 2, schedule #5, enumerated on 10 June 1895, FHL#565810.

This will be the last census that George (died 1898), Alexander (died 1905)  and John Barclay (died 1897) all appear in.  Even though Alexander lives till 1905 I have not been able to find him in the 1900 census nor the Minnesota state census of 1905.

1890: Alexander Barclay, Awarded Civil War Pension!

Alexander Barclay, George’s brother, was awarded his civil war pension on the 20th of December 1890.  Alexander was living in Eureka Township, Dakota County, Minnesota at that time.

I sent for Alexander’s Civil War Pension file 18 April 2001 and it came 22 May 2001.  I filled out the National Archives Order for Copies of Federal Pensionor Bounty Land Warrant Applications which means I did very well and it came within a month.

NARA (The National Archives)  has an online order system now and it  works pretty well.   The other option is to hire a professional genealogist and have them go and obtain the documents for you.   There is a National Capital Area Chapter of APG  It is actually better to consider this option because they know what they are doing and will make sure you get all the correct documents.   The cost of ordering a Civil War pension went up a few years back and it is expensive to pay the fee.  I can recommend someone if you need help.  Just leave a comment. 

Alexander Barclay’s Civil War Pension contained the following documents:

1.  Soldier’s Certificate – Priv and Copr. Co. Ch. 4 Minn Vol. Inf. #14078, #31

The Cover Jacket to Alex’s Civil War Pension

2.  August 19th, 1890 – Invalid Pension – State of Minnesota, County of Dakota, 19th of August, appeared before a notary public Alexandria Barclay, 46 years, resident of Farminton, county of Dakota, State of Minnesota, …duly sworn and according to law is the Alexandria Barclay who enrolled on 1 January 1864 as Corp. in Co. C, 4 Reg. Minn Inf. Vol. and was honorably discharged at Louisville, Ky, on the 19th day of July, 1865…That he is unable to earn a support by reason of Rheumatism…That he has not yet applied for pension under application not yet given.  PO is Farmington, county of Dakota, Minnesota, Claimant’s signature – A.A. Barclay, Attest L.T. Fluke and G.S. Cable.  Also personally appeared L.F. Fluke residing in Farmington and G.S. Cable residing in Farmington.  …saw Alexandria Barclay the claimant sign…acquaintenance for 18 years – signed L.P. Fluke and G.S. Cable, Sworn to ….19th August 1890.  Leonard Aldrich notary public, Dakota County, Minn.   #38701 Soldier’s Application – Alex Barclay – filed by Travis and Brown.  Date of Execution Aug. 19, 1890.

3.  August 23, 1890 – Invalid Pension – Claimant Alexander Barclay, Farmington, Dakota County, Minnesota, Rank Priv and Corp. Co. C, Regiment 4, Minn Vol. Inf. Rate $12.00 commencing Aug. 23, 1890.  Disability Rheumatism and disease of heart and rectum.

4.  August 28, 1890 – Card – J.E. [Hust] Ex’r No. 944426, Alexandria A. Barclay P.O. Farmington, Dakota Co., Minn, C 4 Minn. Inf. Enlisted:  January 1, 1864, Discharged July 19, 1865, Application filed Aug. 23, 1890.  No other claims, Num. No. 380901, Attorney Travis & Brown, Crawfordville, Ind.

5.  December 16, 1890 – Soldier’s Application filed by John H. Mullen Adjutant General of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn.  Declaration for Invalid Pension – State of Minnesota, County of Dakota, 16 December…appeared before a Notary Public…the aforesaid Alexander A. Barclay who was enrolled on the Twenty fifth day of September A.D. 1861 in Co. C of the 4th Regiment Minn. Vol. Infy. …was honorably discharged at Louisville, KY. on the 19th of July 1865…and he is now unable to earn a support by reason of Rheumatism.  PO address is Farmington, County of Dakota, State of Minnesota.  Signed by A.A. Barclay and witnesses are H. H. Williamson and C.G. Thyle.   H.H. Williamson resident of South St. Paul and C.G. Thyle residing at Farmington. …say they were present and saw Alexander A. Barclay the claimant sign…acquaintance with him for 20 years and 4 years respectively.  Signed by H.H. Williamson and C.G. Thyle.  Sworn..16th December 1890.  Leonard Aldrich Nortary Public. 

6.  February 5, 1891 – Delaration for Invalid Army Pension – Minnesota, County of Dakota.  On this 5th day of February 1891 personally appeared before me a notary public, Alexander Barclay, aged 47 years, resident of Farmington, County of Dakota, State of Minnesota….declares he is the identical Alexander Barclay who enlisted in the service of the United States at Ft. Snelling, County of Hennepin, State of Minnesota on the 25th day of October 1861 as a Corporal in Company C of the 4th Regiment of Minnesota Infantry Vols and was honorably discharged at Louisville, State of Kentucky on the 19th day of July 1865. 

That his personal description is as follows:  Age 47 years, height 5 feet 3.5 inches, complexion light, hair light,  eyes hazel…in the service…near a place in the State of North Carolina in the Fall of 1864 While on Sherman’s March to the Sea he contracted the disease of Rheumatism which was caused by the long march and the severe explosure.  Ever since to the present he has been afflicted with said malady, and he based this claim for pension upon Rheumatism. 

Since leaving the service he has resided in Minnesota…his occupation has been that of a Laborer…That he is now So disabled from obtaining his subsistence by manual labor by reason of his injuries…

He hereby appoints with full power …Travis and Brown of Crawfordsville, Indiana his ture and lawful attorney to prosecute his claim.  That he has not received nor applied for pension….Signed by Alexander Barclay.  Witnesses W. A. Gray and J.M. D. Craft…have known him for 15 years and his occupation has been that of a laborer.  Signed by Leonard Aldrich, Notary Public, Dakota County, Minnestoa. #944426 – Invalid Pension Original Claim of Alexander Barclay, of Capt. Rufus P. Wells, Company C, Reg’t 4, Minnesota Infty Enlisted October 25, 1861, discharged July 19, 1865. 

7.  Feb 9, 1891 – Card #944426, Alexander Barclay, Farmington, Minn, Service: Corp C, 4, Minnes. Inf., Enlisted:  October 25, 1861, Discharged: July 19, 1865.  Application filed:  Feb. 9, 1891, Attorney Travis & Brown, Crawfordsville, Ind.   Another card with not much on it.

8.  June 13, 1891 – Dept. of the Interior:  West Div., GEB Ex’r No. 944428, Washington D.C. June 13, 1891, It is alleged that Alexander Barclay enlisted Oct. 25, 1861 and served as Corporal in Co. C, 4 Reg’t Minn. Inf. and was discharged at Louisville, KY, July 19, 1865.  It is also alleged that while on duty during Sherman’s march to sea on or about Fall of 1864 he was disabled by Rheumatism.  Signed by [G…B. Raum] Commissioner.

9.  Jun 16, 1891 – #944426 War Department Record and Pension Division, Alexander Barkley, Co. C, Reg’t 4 Minn Inft. enrolled Sept 25, 1861 and d.c. July 19, 1865, From Aug. 31, 1864 to Feby 28, 1865 he held the rank of Corporal.  Other research furnish nothing additional bearing upon this case.  No medical records found.  H. Ainsworth, Captain and Ass’t. Suregon, U.S. Army.

10.  July 15, 1891 – Surgeon’s Certificate in the case of Alexander Barclay, Co. C, 4 Reg’t, Minn, Inf. Applicant for Original #944426.  Date of Examination July 15, 1891.  Signed by Board – H.O. Smith M.D. Pres., G.R. Moloney M.D., Sec’y, J.P. Caldwell M.D., Treas. P.O. Shakopee, County of Scott, State of Minn. 

Original Pension Claim No. 944426, Alexander Barclay, Rank Pvt & Corp. Company C, 4 Reg’t, Minn, Inf. shakopee, Minn. Claimant P.O. Farmington, Minn. July 15, 1891.  Cause of disability Rheumatism.  Says he has rheumatism in the past five years.  Upon examination:  Pulse rate 88, respiration 18, temperature 98 1/2, height 5 ft. 5 1/2 inches, weight 130 pounds, age 47 years. 

Body well nourished, skin healthy, tongue coated brown, gums healthy, conjunctiva congested, arcus senilis in both eyes, Pterygiun in both eyese, liver trudy on pressure, spleen tender on pressure, he has sciatica along the whole course of sciatica on left side, there is arthristic rheumatism of both shoulder & elbow joints with crepitation in all.  There is no enlargment of joints but much tenderness on pressure.  Motion of all said joints is limited about one half.  The rect muscle of back on right side are very much hardened and those on the left side are atrophied, motion of hip and knee joints on right side are limited about one half.  Motion of similar joints on left side is somewhat less, hearts action feeble with slightly stenosis of the Aortic valve apea beat about 1 1/2 inches below left nipple, pulse after coming up on flight of stairs registers 10 f. Rectum congested two pil tumors 1/2 an inche in diameter each.  No other disease found to exist. 

He is in our opinion entitled to a 12/18 rating for the disability caused by Rheumatism & 2/18 for the cause of Piles and 9/18 for the caused by other disabilities. Signed by Smith, Moloney and Caldwell – the Board.

11.  January 15, 1898 – #662988 Dept. of the Interior, Alexander Barclay.  Are you married? Answer:  I was never married and have no adopted children.  Date: July 4th, 1898, Signed Alexander Barclay. 

12.  June 9, 1906 – Pensioner Dropped, U.S. Pension Agency, Milwaukee, Wis. INVALID, Class June 27th, 1890, Soldier:  Alexander Barclay, Service Pri & Corp. Co. 4 Minn.  Paid at $12.00 to October 4, 1905.  Dropped:  Death 9 Dec. 1905, E.D. Coe US Pension Agent.

13.  Card June 9, 1906 – Cert No. 662988, Alexander Barclay, Issued Sept. 29, 1891, Mailed October 10, 1891.  Rate and Period:  $12, from Aug. 23, 1890.  Dropped Jun 9, 1906.  Dead.

In 26 November 1891 Alexander joined his local GAR Canby Post #47. This is the Grand Army of the Republic.  Wikipedia has an article with references about this organization which was very popular during the later part of the 1800’s and early 1900’s.  The records are hit and miss but still worth trying to find.  You may find them in the state archives or check in the local area at a genealogical society or historical. 

The GAR has a museum in Philadelphia that might be worth checking out:  http://garmuslib.org/  This organization concentrates on PA and NY but they might be able to advise how to find the local GAR in a specific area?

The History of Dakota County, City of Hastings, 1891 by Rev. Edward D. Neill and J. Fletcher Williams, pg. 380-381, North Star Publishing 1881, talked a little about Alexander’s experiences. 

“Alexander A. Barclay was born in Hartford, Connecticut, 1843. Came to Minnesota with his brother at the age of twelve years and settled in Scott county. In 1861, he enlisted in Company C, First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry and at the expiration of the ninety day’s term, re-enlisted in Company C, Fourth Minnesota, serving in the army of the Tennessee through the war; participated in the leading battles of that army, among which were the siege at Vicksburg, Atlanta, and on the “March to the Sea.” His command took part in the grand review at Washington in June 1865, and was finally mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, in July of that year. Mr. Barclay returned to Scott County, and in 1872, removed to his present home in Eureka township.”

Unfortunately I do not have a picture of my great great Uncle and I tried to find something to represent his journey and participation in this review.

Wikipedia has an article about the Grand Review.  It was the parade that took place in Washington D.C. at the end of the Civil War.  This article suggests other sources that have more photographs of this event.  I was told that it would be very difficult to find photographs because they didn’t have the expertise at the time to take pictures of moving objects.  Perhaps I should have kept digging.  The Library of Congress might be another possibility.  There is a great photograph of the soldiers on their horses riding down the street at this article and other articles with photos: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Review_of_the_Armies