Daniel D. Spracklins Estate: Revisiting the Partition Deeds of his heirs…

I promised I would share about the partition deeds that were part of the estate of Daniel D. Spracklin in each of the posts about his children but I ended up getting to involved with the writing of each post about Daniel’s 2nd family and didn’t have the room.

So let me share the deeds for some of the heirs of Daniel and I think they are really wonderful.  These are not the originals but typed copies of the deeds by the court clerk.

Here is the post that I wrote in August titled: Daniel D. Spracklin’s Estate: The Partition Deeds, August 29, 2015. This post referred to a Referree Deed as well which I will not share here.

Here is the list of those who participated in the partitioning of Daniel’s land in Dayton Twp., Iowa Co., Iowa and these deeds helped me to find where the they all went.

1. Spracklin, V.H. & wife (Mae) Co. of Sanborn, So. Dakota – 1/23/1917 – $149.50.  This is Virda Huston and his wife Mae.

2. Spracklin, E.S. & wife (Mrs. E.G. Spracklin) Co. of Shelby, IA – 9/23/1916 – $150.50 – This person is Elmer George Spracklin son of Henry Spracklin, brother to Amarilla and of the first family.

3. Spracklin, P.S. – Single…his wife, Co. of Iowa, IA. – 1/13/1917 – $150.50 – I think this is Peter George Spracklin who is a son of Daniel and Sarah Spracklin.

4. Spracklin, C.E. etal (wife is Arminda V. Spracklin & Ammarilla Dawes, single) – 12/22/1916 $152.50 – This is the one in which Amarilla Barclay Dawes and Charles Edward Spracklin came together to release their claim on their father Daniel’s land.  It is done in Minnesota.

5. Spracklin O.R., single Co. of Sanborn, So. Dakota – 1/18/1917 – $153.50  – Based on the Heir-at-Law form that I have featured on this blog in my posts about Daniel’s Estate, I think this is Raymond Ortha Spracklin another son of Henry Spracklin and Elizabeth Bendon.

Partition Deeds for Daniel Spracklin's Estate 1915

Partition Deeds for Daniel Spracklin’s Estate 1915

Partition Deed for Daniel Spracklin

Partition Deed for Daniel Spracklin

These deeds were together in order in the book at the courthouse on my trip to Iowa in 2003 and I do not understand why there were only these individual’s listed.  Based on the Heirs-at-law form from Daniel’s estate there should be more?  Reed Spracklin, was the Administrator of the estate so he had an agreement with Daniel.

Source:  D.D. Spracklin, Register of Deeds, Iowa Co., Iowa, Marengo, Iowa, Book 73, pg. 88, Iowa County Courthouse. 

Daniel Spracklin’s Children: Charles Edward Spracklin Settles in Minnesota 1874-1946

Charles Edward Spracklin

Charles Edward Spracklin

Charles Edward Spracklin was a son of Daniel and Sarah Spracklin.  He was born the 19th of September, 1874 in Benton Co., Iowa according to my records; however, his Death Certificate gives 1873 as his birth year.

Charles Edward or Ed as I think he was called, lived in Benton County, Iowa with his parents and migrated with them to Iowa County, Iowa.  He remained with his parents up to about 1905. He is featured the 1885 1895, 1905 Iowa State Census which I have shared on this blog in posts about his father Daniel.  He was also in the  1900 U.S. Federal Census.

By 1910 he migrated up to Pine River, Cass Co., Minnesota although his obituary says he came there in 1915. He concentrated on the townships west of Pine River in the lower part of the county.

Cass County Twp.

Cass County Twp.

He married Arminda Victoria Ward about 1915 probably in Minnesota. I do not know her father’s name but her mother was Martha Ellen Walker.  There is an Arminda V. Ward living with a Jonas O. Welker and Edward C. in Bungo Twp., Cass Co., Minnesota in 1910.  She is listed as his niece and age 26. She was born in Minnesota and her parents were born in Ohio. Jonas’ parents were born in Ohio and New Hampshire. He is a farmer on a general farm.  I could not find her in the 1900 U.S. Census but I did find her in the 1905 Minnesota State Census as Armenda V. Ward, age 21, census date June 26, 1905, Cass County, Bungo, Minnesota, born about 1884 and above her is listed an Ora J. Welker and Edwin C. Welker.

Arminda was the author of the Spracklin Family Outline featured on the Solomon Goss Blog dated August 5, 2011 titled: Ancestor Outline by Armindo Spracklin.  You will see that she has different vital dates for some of the children of Daniel and Sarah, but that is not unusual in genealogy.  I will make a page for this Outline that she created and publish it at the top of this blog, it is very special source given to me by my Aunt Miriam.

In 1917 he is involved with the deed partitioning the land of his father Daniel Spracklin and he shares this deed with his sister Amarilla and his wife Arminda.  I will present more information in a later post on these partition deeds.

Portion of the Deed for Charles, Arminda and Amarilla for Daniel's estate

Portion of the Deed for Charles, Arminda and Amarilla for Daniel’s estate

Charles Edward Spracklin registered for the Draft in 1918. We see that Charles writes he was born in 1875, so his birth year keeps changing.

Charles Edward Spracklin, Star Route Pine River, Cass Co., Minnesota, age 43, birth 19 Sept 1875. White, Native born, occupation farming, self, Nearest Relative: Mrs. Arminda Spracklin, Star Route, Pine River, Cass, Minnesota, Medium height, medium build, eyes brown, color dark, Signed by Robert Paulsen, 12 September, 1918.  Source: WWI Draft Cards: Charles Edward Spracklin, WWI Draft Card, #751, Pine River, Cass Co., Minnesota, Order#1788, 12 Sept 1918.

On 10 April 1919 Charles Edward Spracklin obtained a patent for land in Minnesota.

Charles' Patent

Charles’ Patent

Charles land from BML

Charles land from BML

Charles and Arminda are in the 1920 U.S. Federal Census in Minnesota:

Source:  Charles E. Spracklin Family, 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Walden Twp., Cass Co., Minnesota, SD#6, ED#93, Sht 2A, enumerated 26, January 1920 by B.F. Rhoades.

Line 6, EM, 25, 25, Spracklin, Charles, E. head, O, M, Male, White, 45, Married, yes, yes, born Iowa, father born Ohio, mother born Indiana, yes, farmer, farm, C, 13.
Spracklin, Arminda V., wife, F, W, 36, Married, yes, yes, born Minnesota, parents born Ohio
Spracklin, Ines A. M. Daughter, 2 6/12 S, born Minnesota
Abbott, Martha E. mother-in-law, 59 Widowed, yes, yes, born Ohio, Father born Ohio, mother New Hampshire.

In 1928 Charles or Edward “Ed” was in the local news.  I was trying to find out more about Charles Edward because it is rumored his brother Peter came to Minnesota and other events took place but I was unable to find any other news.

Ed Spracklin in the News

Ed Spracklin in the News

Ed Spracklin’s team indulged in a short runaway Tuesday but before they got fully underway became entangled in a road drag and stopped after the tongue of the wagon had been broken. The wagon was loaded with two Jersey cows so it was fortunate that the road drag interfered. The team became frightened at a passing train. Source: Pine River Journal Newspaper, Pine River, MN Friday, Sept. 28, 1928.

Charles and Arminda were living in Bull Moose Twp., in Cass Co., Minnesota in 1930.

Source: Charles E. Spracklin Family, 1930 U.S. Federal Census, Bull Moose Twp., Cass Co., Minnesota, Dist. 12, ED 11-12, SD 2, Sht 1A 208, Enumerated on August 14, 1920, T138, R31

Line 24, [N6 /14] 6, 6, Spracklin, Charles E. Head, R, yes, M, W, 56, M, 41, No, yes, born Iowa, father born Ohio, mother Indiana, farmer, general, O, yes, No, 6.
Spracklin, Arminda V. Wife, F, W, 46, M, 32, No, yes, born Minnesota. 
Spracklin, Ines E.daughter, F, 2, 12, S, yes, yes, born Minnesota.
Spracklin, George D., son, M, W, 8, S, yes, born Minnesota.  

Charles and Arminda are now in McKinley Twp., Cass Co., Minnesota in 1940.  They have their grandson with them and that means that Ines had died.

Source: Charles E. Spracklin Family, 1940 U.S. Federal Census, McKinley Twp., Cass Co., Minnesota, SD#10, ED#11-31, Sht #1 B, enumerated on 8 April 1940, by Leslie L. Bundry.

Line 47, 11, R, 1, yes, Spracklin, Charles E, Head, M,W , 65, M, No. 6, Iowa, Same place, yes, yes, 24, farmer, farm, OA, 26, yes, 9.
Spracklin, Arminda V. Wife, F, W, 56, Married, No., 7, Minnesota, Same place, yes, no, no, no, no, H.
Spracklin, George D. son, M, W, 18, S, No 7, Minnesota, Same Place, no yes, 39, farm laborer, farm, CW, 52, 100, no.
Klinet, Charles, grandson, M, W, 3, S, No 0, Minnesota, —

They had two children:

1.  Ines Amirilla Spracklin born 31 July, 1917 and died 28, November, 1936.  She married a Henry Klinert and they had one child Charles Henry Klinert, born 8 November 1936.   I am happy to say that Charles married in 1959 in Montana and he died in San Diego, California. Find A Grave has a memorial to him and his wife at the Miramar National Cemetery there. Henry, the father,  was living in Bull Moose Twp., in the 1940 Census listed alone and as a widow. There is a Henry Klinert who died in 1989 in Crow Wing, Minnesota but I don’t know if it him at this time. I think Ines would be proud to know her son Charles was a highly decorated serviceman.  Ines Spracklin Klinert is buried near her father in the Bethlehelm Cemetery in McKinley Twp., Cass Co., Minnesota. Find A Grave has a memorial for her.

2.  George David Spracklin born 5 August, 1921 and died 4 June, 1993 in Miles City, Custer Co., Montana. He married first to Mary Josie Kastanck and had four children: David Edward, Clifford Joe, Elise Inez, Suzzy Mabel. He then remarried to a Marla Jean Fleming in Miles City, Montana and had one daughter.  After 1946, George took his mother to Montana after the death of his father Charles Edward because she wanted to be buried in the mountains as the story goes. George died in Miles City, Montana on 4 June, 1993 and is buried in the Custer County Cemetery.  He doesn’t have a tombstone but instead, he has a metal tag on his gravesite. I have placed a memorial at Find A Grave for him.

Charles Edward Spracklin passed away on 10 September 1946:

002190 #Death Cert. or 2490? Died in Deerfield Twp., Cass Co., Minnesota, usually resides in the same place. Was in that community 5 years. Male, white, married to Arminda who was 63 yrs old. Date of Birth for Charles was Sept. 19, 1873, age 72 yrs, 11 mos, 21 days. Occupation farmer born in Benton Co., Iowa. Father Daniel Dare Spracklin born in Ohio, mother Sarah Blackier born in Ohio. Informant was George Spracklin of Backus, Minnesota. Charles was buried at McKinley Twp. on 9/16/1946. Northland Funeral Home handled the arrangements, located in Pine River, Mn. Signed by Annie Compton on 9/19/1941, Local Registrar. He died on Sept. 19, 1946 of chronic myocarditis over 8 months. D.E. Gyres, M.D. ? of Pegquote Falls, 9/11/1946.

Cass Co. Pioneer of 34 years is buried at Backus:  

Funeral services were held in Backus for Charles Edward Spracklin, 72 years of age, who passed away September 10th at his home in Deerfield Township. Services were held at the Backus Congregional Church with Reverend Glen Erickson officiating. Music and singing were furnished by Mrs. Erikson and Donna Culter. Pallbearers included Bill Backs, John Cunningham, Harold Roger, Ernie White, James Bishop and Melvin Ray.

Internment in the Backus cemetery. A resident of Cass County for 34 years Mr. Spracklin was well known and highly respected and his many friends were saddened by the news of his death. Charles Edward Spracklin born September 19, 1874, at Benton, Iowa, and passed away September 10, 1946 at his home in Deerfield Township, Cass County, Minnesota.

He had 15 brothers and five sisters, 18 of whom preceded him in death. At 18 months of age he moved with his parents to Deep River, Iowa. When he was 18 he migrated to western North Dakota and eastern Montana for a short time, then returned to Deep River, Iowa, by way of Shenandoah, Nebraska. In 1912 he came to Pine River, in 1919 he moved to Backus, where he resided until his death. During that time he made three trips to the Dakota harvest field and two to Iowa for corn picking. In 1915 he was united in marriage to Minn Armenda Ward, of Pine River. This union, a son and daughter were born. His daughter preceded him in death 10 years ago. He had been ill for some time. He leaves to mourn his passing his wife and son, George, and four grandchildren, all of Backus. Also 41 nieces and nephews, and many great, and great great nieces and nephews. The out-of-town guests at the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. George Gilchrist and their two sons, Alvin and Delmer of Sobway, Minn.; Mr. and Mrs. Vanderhoff of Nisswa, and Lewis Gilchrist, also of Sobway.

Source:  Walker Pilot Newspaper, July 20, 1946.

Note:  15 brothers and five sisters is a little much and I am not sure why these number were given in the obituary.  Again the year of his birth changes.

Charles Edward Spracklin is buried in the Bethlehem Cemetery in McKinley Twp., Cass County, Minnesota. Find A Grave has the cemetery listed in Pine River but is it pretty far from the town. I visited his grave in 2007 when I returned for the 3rd time to Pine River on a genealogical research trip.  It took a bit of driving on country roads next to corn fields and going straight west into the sun from Pine River and then north to find the cemetery.  Charles did not have a stone but he did have a small metal stake.  I have added a memorial for him at Find A Grave.

Charles E. Spracklin

Charles E. Spracklin

CharlesSpracklin2

Charles E. Spracklin grave site

Arminda wanted to be buried in the mountains so she moved to Bozeman, Montana after Ed’s death. I visited Arminda’s grave site in the Sunset Hills Cemetery in Bozeman,  I tried to locate a tombstone but there wasn’t one at the site. The following is a picture of me standing approximately where her grave is located in this cemetery.  I wanted to pay my respects to her for writing the Spracklin Pedigree outline.

Arminda's Grave in Sunset Hills Cemetery in Bozeman, MT.

Arminda’s Grave in Sunset Hills Cemetery in Bozeman, MT.

Source: Death Certificate for Arminda Spracklin, date of death 26 July, 1955. #130, Montana, Gallatin Co.,  died at the Bozeman Deaconess Hospital. Female, White, widowed, date of birth June 17, 1883, age 72 years, housewife, home, born New York, Mills, Minnesota, father unknown, mother Martha Walker, husband Charles Spracklin. Informant George D. Spracklin, cause of death heart failure with complications. Name of Cemetery Sunset Hills. etc. 

So it turns out that there were several Spracklins that migrated and lived in Minnesota.

Daniel Spracklin’s Children: Peter George Spracklin A Very Restless Man…1957

Peter George Spracklin

Peter George Spracklin

Peter George Spracklin has given me quite a lot of trouble.  He has been very difficult to research.  He was a restless man and migrated to many places over the years. This has been confirmed by his descendants who say he went to Minnesota, Oregon, and other parts of the country but eventually ended up in Reading, Pennsylvania.

Peter George Spracklin was a son of Daniel and Sarah Spracklin.  He was born 31 August, 1872 in Dayton Twp., Iowa Co., Iowa. His death certificate has 1874 but I think that is not quite right?

He died 26 January, 1956 in Reading, Berks Co., Pennsylvania.  He is buried in the Forest Hills Cemetery in Reading. Peter has a memorial at Find A Grave but no tombstone picture at this time.

Peter appears in the 1880 U.S. Federal Census with his parents and siblings and also in the 1885 Iowa State Census living in Dayton Twp., Iowa Co., Iowa. By the 1895 Iowa State Census Peter is not present. He would have been about 23 years old when he left home.

Peter marries the following year from the census on 1 January, 1896 to Etta Mae Hall in Calhoun Co., Iowa. She was born about 1878 in Iowa and her parents were J.W. Hall and S.E. Hardesty.

I can’t find Peter in the 1900 census, however, but I did find him with Etta in the 1910 U.S. Federal Census living in Poweshiek County, Iowa.

Source:  Peter George Spracklin Family, 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Warren Twp., Poweshiek Co., Iowa, SD#6, ED#127, Sht#4B, enumerated on 20 April, 1910 by Charles H. Marble. Note:  The page is very difficult to read and faded so I don’t know what kind of work he was doing. 

Line 65, 66, 67, Spracklin, Peter George, Head, M, W, 34, M1, all born Iowa, father born England, mother born Iowa.  

Spracklin, Etta May, wife, F, W, 31, M1, five born five living, born Iowa, father Ohio, mother born Iowa.
Spracklin, Blanche Alma, daughter, F, W, 13, S
Spracklin, Hattie Ellen, daughter, F, W, 11
Spracklin, Ivan [Transis], Son, M, W, 5
Spracklin, Charles Earl, Son, M, W, 2
Spracklin, Emma Jane, daughter, F, W, 2/12

In the 1915 Iowa State Census which is a series of cards. Peter is not listed in Emmet County but Etta is with the children.

#207 Female, white, married, can read and write, 36 years in US, 28 in Iowa. Etta M. Spracklin, age 36, Emmet, Estherville, 8 common school, Christian, father born Ohio, mother born Iowa. 

#208 Female, white, single, can read and write, 16 years in US, 6 years in Iowa, Hattie E. Spracklin age 16, Emmet, Estherville, Ward 2, 8 common school 1 high school, born Iowa, Christian, parents born Iowa. 

#209 Male, white, Public 9, can read and right, 10 years in US, 9 years in Iowa, Iven F. Spracklin, age 10, Emmet, Estherville, 4 common, born Oregon, parents born Iowa. 

#210 Male, white, Public School, can read and write, 8 years in Iowa, Charles E. Spracklin, age 8, Emmet, Estherville, Ward 2, parents born in Iowa.

#211, Female, white, years in Iowa 5, Ema B. Spracklin age 5, Emmet, Estherville, parents born in Iowa. 

Etta Mae Hall married Robert J. West on the 2nd of March, 1916 in Albert Lea, Freeborn Co., Minnesota according to the Minnesota Marriage Index so it is not surprising to find Peter in the 1920 census listed as divorced.

In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census we find Peter with his son Ivan in Nebraska adding another state to his list of wanderings.

Line 95: 17/17 Spracklin Peter, head, Renting, male white, age 47, divorced, can read and write, born in Iowa, father born in Ohio, mother born in Indiana, laborer. Ivin Spracklin, son, male, white, age 14, single, can read and write born in Oregon, father born in Iowa, mother born in Iowa, occupation none.

Source:  1920 U.S. Federal Census, Dustin Twp., Holt Co., Nebraska, SD 6, ED 1, Sht #4B, Jan. 2, 1920 by James D. Beck.

Peter and Etta had the following children:

1.  Blanche Alma Spracklin was born 9 August, 1896 in Calhoun Co., Iowa and died in 2001. She married a J.P. Vanderoff on 15 April, 1914.  He was born 8 December, 1888 and died 2 April 1951 in Shattuck, Faribault, Minnesota. They had Roy Poe Vanderoff born in 1919 in Iowa. Roy married Donna and had five children.

Source: 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Superior Twp., Dickinson County, Iowa, SD#11, ED#52, Sht#1B, enumerated 15, March 1920, by Harry L. Davis. 

Line 59, X, 11, 11, Vanderoff, John P. Head, R, M, W, 31, M, yes, yes, born Iowa, parents born New York, yes, Laborer, Section

Vanderoff, Alma Blanche, wife, F, W, 23, m, yes, yes, born Iowa, parents born Iowa

Vanderoff, Roy, son, M, W, 5/12, S, born Iowa, parents born Iowa.

Anderson, Ernest, Lodger, M, W, 21, S, yes, yes, born Illinois, parents born Ohio, laborer, general

Anderson, Lionel, Lodger, M,W, 26, S, yes, yes, born Illinois, parents born Ohio, proprietor, garage.

Blanche Alma Spracklin died on 15 March, 2001 in Roseburg, Douglas Co., Oregon. She is buried in the Wilbur Cemetery in Wilbur, Douglas Co., Oregon.  Find A Grave has a memorial to her, a picture of her tombstone and an obituary notice that is pretty detailed.

There is a WWII draft card #161 for a John P. Vanderoff age 28 years old, Home Spirit Lake, Iowa, dated of birth December 8, 1888, natural-born in Fort Dodge, Iowa. Farmer, self in Dickinson Co., married, Caucasian, no military service. He is medium height, medium build, eyes blue, hair black, not bald and has all his body parts, signed by John S. Blou, Dickinson Co., Iowa, June 5, 1917.

2.  Hattie Ellen Spracklin was born 29 October, 1898 and I have that she died about 1969. I don’t have much on her life. She may have married a Carl R. Abolt.

Source:  Iowa County Marriages: Name Carl R. Abolt, Event Date 21 Nov. 1920 in Iowa. his age is 21 father W.D. Abolt, mother Nellie Bentry, Spouse Hattie Spracklin, age 21 born about 1899 Father PJ Spracklin, Etta Hall. Iowa County marriages index. GS Film #1863613.

In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census there is a Hattie Spracklin age 21 born about 1899 living on 15th Street, singled and occupied at a Barber shop in Des Moines, Iowa.

In trying the 1930 and 1940 U.S. Census I cannot find a Carl with a Hattie.  I find a Carl living in Des Moines but on his own.  There are multiple Hatties in the 1940 Census with different surnames.

3.  Ivan Frank Spracklin was born 25 February. 1905 in Roseburg, Douglas, Oregon. He married Florence L. Nick and they had four children together.  Ivan appears with his family and wife Florence in the 1940 U.S. Federal census living in Reading, Pennsylvania.

4.  Charles Earl Spracklin was born 11 June, 1907 and died 21 December, 1999 in Reading, Berks Co., Pennsylvania.  He married Catherine and had six children one died as a baby.

In the 1930 U.S. Federal census for Reading, Pennsylvania Peter is living with his son Charles and family.  By the 1940 census Peter is not listed but Charles and Catherine are there with their children living in Reading.

5. Birdie Emma Spracklin was born 7 July 1909.  She married a Richard Gage on 3 August, 1928 in Jackson (not sure if it is Minnesota or Iowa) and had several children. Richard Gage is buried in the Owatonna Memorial Gardens in Steele Co., Minnesota. Find A Grave has a memorial but not a photo of the tombstone.  There is a Birdie listed but the dates are 1909 to 1919 and I am not sure what that means.

Birdie and Richard a living in Emmet Twp., Emmet Co., Iowa in the 1930 U.S. Federal Census.  They have Deloris with them and she is a baby.  They migrated to Westford Twp., Martin Co., Minnesota by the 1940 U.S. Federal Census.  They have their four daughters with them: DeLoris, Orpha, Geraldine, and Katherine.

Returning to the mother, Etta Mae appears with her husband Richard West in the 1920 and 1930 U.S. Census in Center Twp., Emmet Co., Iowa.  By 1940 they have migrated to Minnesota and settled in Westford Twp., Martin Co., Minnesota.  Martin Co. is along the border between Minnesota and Iowa. There is also a 1910 U.S. Census in which a Richard West appears with his wife Nellie and children in Estherville:  George, Everett, Charley and Bird.

Etta Mae Hall Spracklin West passed away on the 7th of September in 1972.  She outlived both husbands by 15 years.  A cousin thinks this obituary is not quite correct, so be careful.

Mrs. Robert J. West (Etta May) 93, died yesterday, Sept 7, 1972 at a nursing home in Crosby, Minn. She was a former resident of Estherville. Funeral services will be held at 1:30 pm, Monday in Fuhrman Funeral Home, Estherville, and interment will be made in East Side Cemetery. She was born Sept. 22, 1878 at Coon Rapids. She was married to Mr. Spracklin who later died. After his death she was married to Robert J. West and they farmed east of Estherville. He died in 1957. She lived in Estherville for some time, then moved to Minnesota a few years ago.

Survivors include five sons, Ivan Spracklin of Reading PA., Robert West of Faribault, Minn., Everett West of California and George West of Adel; four daughters, Mrs. Richard (Birdie) Gage of Owatonna, Minn. Mrs. Blanche Vanderhoff of Roseburg, Ore., Mrs. Bern Busy of Adel and Mrs. Rose Maloney of Lewisville, Minn.; 13 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild; and one sister living in California. Friends may call at Fuhrman Funeral Home, Estherville, after noon on Sunday until time of services. Source: Estherville Daily News, Friday, September 8, 1972, page 8.

Robert and Etta are buried in the East Side Cemetery in Estherville, Iowa.  Find A Grave has a memorial and tombstone photo for Etta Mae West along with her husband Robert with links.

Peter George’s Death Certificate from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, #060-085, #1952 #204:  Died in Berks Co., Reading, PA at St. Joseph’s Hospital, Alsace Twp., Hay Road (Tempe R.D. #1). Peter G. Spracklin died January 26, 1957. Male, White, Divorced. Date of birth Aug 30, 1874 (??) age 82. Laborer, contracting firm. born in Iowa. Father is Daniel D. Spracklin no record on the mother. Did not serve in Armed forces, Informant Charles E. Spracklin residence Reading, PA. Peter died of shock and hemorrhage and gastric ulcer chronic with general arteriosclerosis. Signed by the Coroner. Burial Jan 30, 1957 in Forest Hills Memorial Park, Exeter Twp.,  Berks, PA.

If you would like more information on this family, please leave a comment and I will find you. There are living descendants of this couple and I am sure they would be willing to share, they have been very generous to me.  As usual please double-check the information presented here and realize that I have not presented all that I have.

Daniel Spracklin’s Children: Daniel Goss Spracklin 1870 to 1927

Daniel Goss Spracklin was a son of Daniel D. and Sarah Spracklin.  He was born 21 September, 1870 in Benton Co., Iowa. He died 8 August, 1927 in Calhoun Co., Iowa and is buried in the Cedar Township Cemetery in Calhoun County.

Daniel’s mother Sarah was a member of the Methodist Protestant Church circuit that covered the churches of Deep River, Bethel, Mt. Zion, Spring Dale, and Keswick in Iowa and Poweshiek County. Sarah was listed as a member and Daniel G. Spracklin’s baptism was listed on page 186. Source: FHL#1003429 Item 3. 

Daniel married on 29 January, 1907 to Susan Matilda Marrow.  She was born 23 August, 1869 in What Cheer, Keokuk Co., Iowa and died on 19 December, 1909 in Enid, Garfield, Oklahoma. Susan’s parents were John Marrow and Rebecca Kinder.

Daniel Goss Spracklin and Susan M. Lash

Daniel Goss Spracklin and Susan M. Lash, courtesy of a cousin

Source: Iowa Marriages, 1809-1992, Family Search, Daniel Goss Spracklin born 1871 in Benton, Iowa, age 36, to Susan Morrow Lash born 1870 in Mahaska County age 37. Marriage took place on 29 January 1907 in Sigourney, Keokuk, Iowa. Daniel’s father was Daniel Dare Spracklin and his mother was Sarah Blacketer.  The bride’s father was John Morrow and her mother was Jane Kinder.  Daniel was single and the bride was widowed.  Source:  Marriage Records for Mahaska Co., Iowa, FHL#1005844, pg. 77

Susan had been married before to a Robert Louis Lash on 16 November, 1890 in Mahaska Co., Iowa ( Source: Marriage Records 1844 to 1939 Mahaska Co., Iowa FHL#985383). Robert was born 10 July, 1869 in What Cheer and he died 23 August, 1899. Find A Grave has a tombstone photo and memorial to Robert with links to several children.  He is buried in the Indianapolis Cemetery in Rose Hill, Mahaska County, Iowa.

Susan and Robert Nash had the following children:

1.  Jessie Orvil Lash born 31 March, 1892 in What Cheer, Keokuk Co., Iowa and he died 16 April 1969 near Deep River, in Poweshiek Co., Iowa.  Jessie is buried in the Goldenrod Cemetery in Deep River, Poweshiek co., Iowa.  Find A Grave has a tombstone photo and memorial to him.

2. Bessie Jane Lash was born 28 March 1894 in What Cheer and died 27 June 1912.

3. Fred Nesburt Lash was born 22 April 1898 in What Cheer and he died 17 January 1930 in California.  He is buried in the Oakdale Citizens Cemetery in Oakdale, Stanislaus Co., California. Find A Grave has a picture of his tombstone and a memorial with links at the website.

4. John Charles Lash was born 24 March 1900 in What Cheer and died the 17th of December 1940 in Hot Springs, South Dakota. He may have married several times and had several children.

In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Susan appears with her children living in Pleasant Grove, Mahaska, Iowa as a widow. She has Jesse, Bessie, Fred and John with her.  She is still there in 1895 per the Iowa State Census.

Going back to 1880 we find Daniel Goss Spracklin in the U.S. Federal Census living with his parents Daniel and Sarah and his siblings. He 10 years old.

In 1885 Daniel is listed under the name Dalia and he is 14 years old. In the 1895 Iowa State census Daniel is 24 years old and he is single.  In both 1885 and 1895 he is living with his parents in Dayton Twp., Iowa County, Iowa.

In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census Daniel G. Spracklin has a birth date of September of 1870 in Iowa. He is 27 years old and single. Daniel is with his parents and brother Charles.

Daniel and Susan Morrow Lash one child together.

5.  Opal Matilda Spracklin born 29 August, 1908 in Poweshiek Co., Iowa. She died February 1987 in Calhoun Co., Iowa. Opal married a Clarence Harrison Vote on 18 August, 1925 in Gilmore City, Humboldt Co., Iowa.

Opal Spracklin as a little baby

Opal Spracklin as a little baby

Clarence was born 8 August, 1888 in Somers, Webster Co., Iowa and died about 15 February, 1976. He was the son of John Martin Vote and Eleanor Amanda Hocket. Clarence had been married before to Lillian Cressinger. She was born 28 March, 1886 and died 10 April, 1920.  They had one daughter named Alberta Lillian.

Clarence and Opal appear in the 1930 U.S. Census.

Source: 1930 U.S. Federal Census in Somers Town, Cedar Twp., Calhoun Co., Iowa.  Clarence is a truck driver for a dray line.  ED 13-6, SD#5, Sht#2A. Enumerated April 3-4, by Lela J. Wright.

Line 32, 38, 40, Vote, Clarence H, Head, 0, $2000, yes, M, W, 41, M, 20, No, Yes, born Iowa, father born PA, mother born Wisconsin, truck driver, dray line, no, 5.

Vote, Opal M., Wife of H, F, W, 21, M, 17, No, yes, born Iowa, parents born Iowa, and all children born Iowa.

Vote, Alberta L, daughter, F, W, 19, S, yes, yes, Iowa

Vote, Bernice A, daughter, F, W, 4 3/2, S, No, Iowa

Vote, Clarence, F, son, M, W, 3 2/12 S, No, Iowa

Vote, John D., son, M,W, 1 3/12 S, No, Iowa

Clarence and Opal are listed in the 1940 U.S. Federal Census living in Somers, Calhoun Co., Iowa,

Source:  1940 U.S. Federal Census living in Somers, Calhoun Co., Iowa, SD#7 ED#13-16, Sht#3A, enumerated 9 April, 1940 by Vesla M. Tripp. 

Line 35, 580, 200 yes, Vote, Dick. O. Head, M, W. 51, M, no 6.6. all born in Iowa, all same house, yes, yes, farmer, farming, 52, 0, yes

Vote. Opal, wife, F, W. 31, M, yes, H1, 9

Vote, Alberta, daughter, F, W, 29, S, no. H4, 30

Vote. Bernice, daughter, F. W. 14, S, yes, 8, 8, Egg [Cauller], Creamery

Vote, Clarence, Son, M, W, 13, S, yes, 5, 5

Vote, John, Son, M, W, 11, S, yes, 5, 5, 

We find Daniel in the 1910 U.S. Federal Census living in Enid, Garfield County, Oklahoma.  He is widowed.

Source:  1910 U.S. Federal Census, Enid Township, Garfield Co., Oklahoma, SD#1, ED#16, Sht #7 A, enumerated on 27 April 1910 by __________.

Line 32, 92, 92, Spracklin, Daniel G., Head, M, W, 39, Wd, all born in Iowa, father born in Ohio, mother born in Indiana, English, farmer, farm

Spracklin, Opal M., daughter, F, W, 2, S, yes, yes. 

Lash, Jessie O., step-son, M, W, 18, S

Lash, Bessie J., step-d, F, W, 16, S

Lash, Fred N., step son, M, W, 12, S

Lash, John C., step son, M, W, 10, S

Daniel has migrated back to Iowa by 1915 and is living in Deep River not to far from where his parents farm was located.  Daniel was not listed with the Estate Partition deeds for his father’s land but he did get his portion of the estate money at the final report in April of 1916.

Source: 1915 Iowa State Daniel G. Spracklin and his daughter Opal appear on the individual cards for that census. 

#54? D.G. Spracklin, age 44, Iowa Co., PO Deep River, Dayton Twp., occupation farmer, total earnings in 1914 $200. Common education 10 yrs. Born in Iowa, father born in Ohio and mother born in Indiana.

#55 Opal Spracklin 6 yrs. old, Iowa Co., PO Deep River, Dayton Twp., born in Iowa, father born in Iowa, mother born in Iowa, six years in Iowa.

In 1920 Daniel is in Iowa with a couple by the name of Gray.  The relationship of the Gray family, if any, to Daniel is unknown to me. Opal, his daughter, is living with Virda Huston Spracklin in Franklin, Jerauld Co., South Dakota. Virda is Daniel’s older brother.

Source: 1920 U.S. Federal Census,  Somers Town, Cedar Twp., Calhoun Co., Iowa, Precinct No. 1, SD#10, ED#32, Sht# 7B, enumerated the 19th & 20th of January, 1920, by William A. Thompson.

Line 95, 162, 165, Spracklin Daniel, Head, 0, M, M, W, 49, wd, born Iowa, father born Ohio, mother Indiana, laborer, steam railroad, W, 85.

Gray, Chauncey, Head, M, W, 58, M, born Illinois, father born New York, parents born New York, carpenter, house, W, house, W. Gray, Blanche A, wife, F, W, 54, M, born Wisconsin, father born Ohio, parents born Ohio. 

Much to my delight, Daniel and Opal appear in the 1925 Iowa State census together.

Source:  1925 Iowa State Census, Somers, Calhoun Co., Iowa, residence date 1 January 1925. Two pages. 

Line 137 Spracklin, Daniel G., Head, m, w, 55, W, 0, F, $500, $300, Born Iowa, Father Spracklin, Daniel D., born Ohio, Mother Sarah Blacketer born Indiana, married in Iowa

Line 138 Spracklin, Opal M., daughter, F, W, 16 S, Father Daniel Spracklin, born Iowa, Mother, Susie M. Morrow, born Iowa, married in Iowa. 

Daniel died the 8th of August, 1927 and he is buried in the Cedar Cemetery in Calhoun County, Iowa.

Daniel Goss Spracklin

Daniel Goss Spracklin, photo courtesy of P. Stoudt

Source: Cedar Township Cemetery, Calhoun County, Iowa,  Published by the Iowa Genealogical Society, Des Moines, Iowa, page 13. 

Please double check the above information and if anyone knows where Susan or Opal are buried, I would like to know.

Another Visit to Montana in 2010: The sites of Montana, Part II

The rest of our trip to Montana in 2010, would be to enjoy the sites and attend the wedding that would take place in Bozeman.

Our first stop, after leaving Miles City, was at the Rosebud Rest Area. It was on a cliff above the Yellowstone River and the view was incredible.

Rosebud Rest Stop

Rosebud Rest Stop and the Yellowstone River

I wanted to visit the Little Bighorn Battlefield again, even though I had seen it on the last trip in 2003.  It is really very interesting and they are now featuring both sides of the conflict.

http://www.nps.gov/libi/index.htm  Here is what I wrote in my travel journal about that experience:

We got their about 1 pm.  The first thing was to go and hear the ranger talk.  This time it was a young lady who I think was new. After, we then went into the visitor center and they said a film was to be shown soon. I looked a look at the gift shop which had a lot of books on the history of the battle, Custer and the Indians.  We found seats for the film.  It was an interesting presentation of the battle giving a little more detail and showing the areas that they were talking about so it added to the Ranger talk.  Once that was over we went through the museum which featured some information and artifacts from Custer’s life donated by his wife who lived 54 years after his death.  What the soldiers worn and used and the mix of their heritage.  Some could not speak English they were new immigrants.  There was information about battle tactics. They had a machine in the back that had selections on the different groups that were involved in the battle and you could search them if you new a name.  They were the soldiers, the officers, the Indians and more.  The had a collection of the guns that were used by the soldiers. 

Ranger Talk at Little Bighorn Battlefield

Ranger Talk at Little Bighorn Battlefield

We then walked up to Last Stand Hill where Custer was killed along with his two brothers Tom and Buster and all the others in his outfit.  He is not there anymore having his remains placed at Annapolis. Others are buried in a mass grave under the big monument.  When they buried them at the time of the battle they did not have the proper tools to bury them and the graves were shallow.  An archaeological dig was done in the 1980’s after a fire had burned the area and they found a lot of artifacts like bullets and other things.  They could track a soldier by his bullets. There is still a lot of conjecture about the battle and the maps show that with the dotted lines. We visited the Indian monument.  They are adding tombstones for the Indian’s in a different color which is good.  They are honoring the Indian’s and trying to show both sides of the battle at this time.  I think that is a good thing.

Indian Exhibit Little Bighorn Battlefield

Indian Exhibit Little Bighorn Battlefield

We then returned to the car to take the road to the other sites which defines the movements of the officer by the name of Reno.  You drive for 5 miles along the ridge through private land.  The rain was upon us by that time with a big cloud and it was not fun so we had to stay in the car.  We arrived at the other end of the road and the rain opened up by then with the big cloud right over us.  I did manage to get the monument and the battle plan of Reno but that was about it before it started to rain. 

A Monument to the Battle

A Monument to the Battle

I think that the battlefield is haunted and it is always raining when I visit. What does that mean?

Our next stop was Billings where we stayed in the Dude Rancher Hotel.  I thought it would be good idea from the description online and have a western flare.  It was interesting.  Later it was on the TV show Hotel Impossible to get a revamp.  http://www.duderancherlodge.com/

I had really enjoyed my visit to the Western History Cultural Center in Billings on my first trip, so I wanted to stop and visit this archive. http://www.ywhc.org/

We arrived at the Western History Cultural Center about 11 a.m. and I figured we would put in two hours but we did about 2.5.  We had to park on the street and use quarters.  It was not like it had been 8 years ago and it was a little disappointing but I enjoyed what was there.  They had the lady photographer’s collection.  Alan had purchased a CD of her work so we have a selection of her photographs and can study them.  All black and white and she was doing this at the turn of the century and early 1896 to 1900’s.  Amazing dedication.  The Cheyenne Exhibit was sad but very interesting.  The oral histories that they have collected from the Indians is a good thing.  I guess you can access them.  The other exhibits were other oral histories of several musicians.  There were paintings and sketches as well.  They saved a sketch book of one of the Indians at one of the forts who had been shot with his sketch books with him and they are wonderful drawings, somewhat childlike but wonderful.

If you like Train Depot’s you might want to check out the one in Billings.  http://www.billingsdepot.org/  http://www.billingsdepot.org/history-depot/

We had to move on so we headed to Livingston arriving a the Train Depot with only fifteen minutes to view it.  The other museum was closing a 5 pm as well.  http://www.livingstonmuseums.org/depot/index.html  My timing on this trip was off a bit.

Livingston, MT

Livingston, MT

From Livingston we made it to Bozeman and found our Comfort Inn without too much trouble and settled in.  The next day was Friday so we had most of the day to dally and would later go to the wedding rehearsal picnic.

My goal was to find the gravesite of Armindo Spracklin the wife of Charles E. Spracklin a 1/2 brother of my great-grandmother Amarilla. The story is she wanted to be buried in the mountains so her son took her to Bozeman to live. This is what happened when we visited the cemetery, from my 2010 travel journal.

Armindo Spracklin's gravesite in Sunset Cemetery, Billings

Armindo Spracklin’s gravesite in Sunset Cemetery, Billings. Me standing about where it would be but no headstone.

We headed first to the Sunset Hills Memorial Park Cemetery and the office for the cemetery.  A nice man in work clothing was in the office and he helped located where Armindo Spracklin wife of Charles Edward Spracklin was buried.  He instructed me that we could follow him for it was a little difficult to find.  He drove thru the cemetery gates in his big truck that had dirt in the back and made his way through the cemetery.  This cemetery is huge so going to the office is a good idea. He came to an area in a shady part of the cemetery and tried to find the grave but there was no stone.  He finally decided it was next to this tree and this other person.  I was a little disappointed but not surprised for her husband’s marker was one of those metal tags. Find A Grave has a memorial and picture pretty much like mine for Armindo.

I wish I had money to do stones for family, maybe I can work something out, but I do have a long list.  Armindo made up a pedigree outline with the names and dates of our family history and I wanted to at least try to find her and pay my respects. I publish that on the Solomon Goss Blog with the title: Ancestor Outline by Armindo Spracklin, August 5, 2011.

Our next stop was the museum where I wanted to see if I could find any information on my great-uncle William Barclay, 1/2 brother to my George A. Barclay. http://gallatinhistorymuseum.org/  I write more:

The Gallatin County and Pioneer Museum which is right next door to the Gallatin County Courthouse.  We went inside and the museum was on the right and the archive center was on the left.  We paid the $5.00 admission fee.  I looked at books and then went into the archive area and was greeted by a nice lady but I was not allowed beyond a certain point.  I didn’t prepare myself for this type of archive and should have known better. 

Gallatin Historical Museum

Gallatin Historical Museum

I gave her William Barclay’s name and she brought me an obituary file but I didn’t find him listed.  I was thinking that if his wife had died in 1919 before him and his baby son had not survived he probably was going to be hard to find and the obituary I wanted would not be done.  She showed me on the map where Pony and Willow Creek were located south of Three Forks and we will go there tomorrow when we go to the Lewis and Clark Caverns.  She told me of a the Headwaters Heritage Museum in Three Forks and that they might have more local information.  He was a miner and poultry farmer in Pony, then Hot Springs and then Willow Creek were he died.  I tried online to see if I could find him in the cemeteries but he is not showing up.  So I will need obituary notices, family histories, cemetery information in the area when I get to the historical society. 

The lady told me that probate and deed indexes and information would be in the courthouse and I thought about going but decided I could call or email them for his probate if there was one.  He had some money and owned the farm in 1930 so he just might have given his inheritance to his brother or something like that? I then toured the museum which was on several floors and they had a chronology of the businesses in the area.  A flip chart of the different communities in the county like Willow Creek which I took a picture of.  Lots of information and artifacts.  A map of the trails to Montana and a little about them like the Bozeman Trail.  

When you travel with your hubby you do have to find activities they will enjoy.  He discovered that there was a Computer Museum in Bozeman.  http://www.compustory.com/

American Computer museum in Bozeman

American Computer museum in Bozeman

It is called the American Computer & Robotics Museum and it was on the south side of town at Kagy and 19th road in a group of buildings that looked like condominiums. We arrived with only about 30 minutes to view the museum and the nice docent gave us a quick tour around and then turned us loose to study the exhibits.  It was a great museum with awards for Computer Pioneering offered to many people.  They had the history of the telephone, TV, telegraph and all technologies that led up to the computer and cell phones. I teased them about a mag card typewriter and MTST which I used in my profession as a secretary.  Apparently they have a warehouse with a lot of stuff in it.  My hubby said they are the biggest computer museum in the country and very prestigious.  We didn’t have much time but at least we now know it exits and I highly recommend it to you. 

We were off to a picnic which was the rehearsal dinner where we gathered at a park in Bozeman.

Rehearsal Dinner picnie

Rehearsal Dinner picnic

Because I had enjoyed the Lewis and Clark Caverns so much I wanted my hubby to see them.  So, the next day, we headed up to the park. The wedding was later in the day. I wrote about this visit in my 2010 travel journal.

The Jefferson River Valley, Yup another river....

The Jefferson River Valley, Yup another river….

The scenery was spectacular.  We came to Three Forks about 40 minutes later and turned south on Highway 2 for the caverns.  It is a semi-circle from the west to the east. We were following the Jefferson River.  There is the Missouri Headwaters Park to the north of I-90 and it is where the Jefferson, Madison and the beginning of the Missouri River meet.  We would not have time to go to the park and see the rivers merge. 

The Sign

The Sign

The entrance to the caverns park has a new visitor center.  We stopped to see what was there. 

Visitor Center at the entrance

Visitor Center at the entrance

We then headed up to the visitor center at the top near the cavern opening.  I remember the climb up is about 2 miles with views of the Jefferson River valley.  We arrived and immediately went to see when the next tour was and we were in luck for it was about 9:45 and the next tour was 10 am. Our guide was young man and fun. He gave us the rules and we walked to the cavern entrance.  This took about 30 minutes to walk the path which is very steep.

The Ranger tells us the rules

The Ranger tells us the rules

At the entrance to the caverns our guide told us the story of the man who promoted the caverns. It turned out he did not have rights to it for it was railroad land and so that began a competition of locking the entrance door and cutting the locks between the man and the railroad company. This went on till his death in 1932 when the railroad gave the land to the State of Montana.  We had to be quiet the first couple of rooms so as not to scare the bats and no flash.  It was really hard to adjust to the lack of light in the caverns. 

We entered the caverns and the stairs going down were dark, but wide enough and there were hand railings in some areas.  The guide would walk us along through the caverns and then stop in a room and give an explanation of the specific room.  The was temperature was cool inside. We went down stairs, through tight tunnels and there were cave formations all around.  Some of the stairs were very steep and in one area we had to slide down on our butts. The formations were spectacular in each room and as we went along the rooms got bigger and bigger. The guide would turn off the lights behind us and turn on the lights ahead.  They had first used wooden steps and they rotted within 2 years and now it was cemented.  All work had been done by candlelight.  

The Caverns

The Caverns

The Caverns more

More views…

In one room the guide turned off the lights and it was so dark you could not see your hand before you. In the last room it had these huge formations. The very last part was a long tunnel with two doors to prevent the wind coming into the cave. 

We were done and it was out into the sunshine again and the wonderful view of the Jefferson River Valley.  We took our time getting back to the visitor center.  I decided to get a hot dog to help with keeping me happy. We headed back down in the car and stopped at a couple of vistas to take pictures. 

Jefferson River Valley

Jefferson River Valley

Before heading back to the motel, we took more time to do research on my great-uncle William Barclay, brother to George A. Barclay.  http://www.tfhistory.org/

Headwaters Museum

Headwaters Museum

We drove back the same way and turned onto a gravel road that took us to Willow Creek where William Barclay, half-brother to George, had homesteaded and died.  We then went on up the road to Three Forks where the Headwaters Heritage Museum was located.  We found it at Cedar and Main in an old bank building. There was a nice lady that greeted us and offered to have her son look for an obit on William Barclay so I gave her some information.  I doubt I will hear from them.  She did loan me the Three Rivers history book but he was not in that either.  The museum was wonderful with vignettes on the upper floor of a dentist office, military sets, trains and more. 

It was time to return to Bozeman and get ready for the wedding. Finding the location proved to be a challenge, because GPS was not working. It was set in a lovely forested area southwest of Bozeman.

The Wedding Venue

The Wedding Venue

The guests gathered out on a lovely grass field as the rain clouds began to gather. A little into the ceremony we started to hear the sounds of thunder.  We were stoic but finally the bride gave the word when the rain started to come down. Everyone made it back to the lodge area very quickly and gathered into the area that the tables were set up for the dinner.  The ceremony resumed as the rain came down outside.  It was a fun wedding and most everyone was there from my husband’s side of the family.

Guests gather

Guests gather

The next day, was our last day in Montana.  We decided to take in the Museum of the Rockies:  https://www.museumoftherockies.org/

We arrived at the Museum of the Rockies which is at the south side of Bozeman on Kagy and it was a lot bigger than I expected.  The parking lot was pretty much full.  In the lobby we found a line waiting for tickets. 

Museum of the Rockies

Museum of the Rockies

DSC06496

 

I wanted to see the dinosaurs and so we headed in that direction. We only had about 2 hours to tour the museum so we needed to move along quickly.  The dinosaur display was wonderful. 

DSC06495

Predators are the little guys

This museum states that T-Rex was a scavenger and not a predator. Scavengers are a more common animal, while predators are not.  I was not aware that they had done so much research since I was interested in Dinosaurs in my childhood. I didn’t realize that they have found dinosaur bones in 48 of the 56 counties.

They had an Indian exhibit, a western exhibit which had some really nice wagons but I could not take pictures. They also had the DaVinci Exhibit we had seen before. Pretty amazing. 

On this trip we had flown into Billings Logan International Airport. http://www.flybillings.com/

Rather than backtrack to Billings, we would fly out of the Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, which is north of Bozeman.  http://www.bozemanairport.com/ I recommend that you go to an airport’s website because they have so much information on them and are truly helpful when you are planning a trip.

Here is what I wrote in my journal in 2010:

It was off to the airport which neither one of us believed was really there because we could not see it from the freeway. It was north of the town in Belgrade. It is a very small airport and there are not many flights out.  Again it was the propeller type airplane like the one we took to Billings. Everyone who had attended the wedding the day before was slowly trickling into this airport, so the wait was fun to have family around to visit with.

After getting our tickets and checking our luggage my hubby headed to the Hertz desk to check in the car. We had done 706 miles for this trip. We headed through security and they made me take my video camera out of the camera bag.  Our gate was about ten steps from the security gate. 

More of the family trickled in as we waited. It was decided that there were about thirteen people on our flight who had attended the wedding.  It was fun to hear them chatting away as we waited for the plane. When the time came to board the plane we walked down some stairs and then climbed into the airplane. The ride was a little bumpy but we arrived safely at SeaTac and were only about fifteen minutes late.  

Seattle, WA

Seattle, WA

Seattle's Downtown area

Seattle’s Downtown area

On this trip we visited with relatives from both sides of the family.  We attended a wedding.  Went to and walked through many museums of a great variety of topics. Took the time to enjoy the beautiful State of Montana.  I was able to learn about and view several rivers and did a little genealogy research regarding my great Uncle William Barclay. As you can see my trips are busy, filled with adventures and complicated.

Another visit to Montana 2010 – A visit with Cousins! Part I

In 2010 my husband’s niece was getting married in Bozeman.  She had been living there training to be a doctor. She met a nice young man who was a policeman for the city.  They had planned their wedding at the Woodlands which was southwest of the town.

We decided to fly to Billings, rent a car and drive to Miles City and visit with Bertha again. This time my husband would get to meet her and see the ranch near Jordan.

From Billings we head east to Pompey’s Pillar National Monument. When you are in Montana you have to stop at the Lewis and Clark historical sites along the way.

http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/lewisandclark/pom.htm

Wm Clark signing at Pompey's Pillar, MT

Wm Clark signing at Pompey’s Pillar, MT

Pompey's Pillar, MT

Pompey’s Pillar, MT

A little bit about our visit to this historic site from my 2010 travel journal:

We watched the little movie they had in the center and then walked around looking at the displays and getting a lesson on Lewis and Clark’s trip to the Pacific Ocean. Wm. Clark had stopped at Pompey’s Pillar on his way back and he carved his name in the rock.  It is now preserved as the only real physical evidence that he had passed this way.  In the Visitor Center were maps and little bios of the two men and what they each brought to the project.  I have seen the History or Discovery TV channel presentations on this journey and there is very little evidence of the trip.  Apparently Clark named the rock Pompey’s Pillar after Sacajawea’s Son.  It was his pet name for the child.

We walked up to the signature by way of wooden stairs and a walkway and then to the top of the rock to see the view.  It was steep but I was glad I did it.  The Yellowstone River meandered to the north of us but it was shrouded in trees.  

The walkway around Pompey's Pillar

The walkway around Pompey’s Pillar – look closely and find the person standing and go to the right.

My hubby wanted to check out a bridge that looked like a train bridge with no tracks.  So we went down the road a bit. I could see that there was no real highway but I spotted what looked like the best entrance and got lucky.  It was gravel road with a fishing access to the river.  The bridge was blocked off and went nowhere.  Apparently the old metal bridge was abandoned.  A highway was built next to it that was relatively new with a new bridge. 

Iron Bridge & Yellowstone River

Iron Bridge & Yellowstone River

Back out on the highway we continued on H-94 to Miles City.  The road was pretty straight and not too challenging. The scenery was ever-changing as we drove along, with buttes and mounds. Some fields were plowed and cultivated.  I tried taking photos out the window of the car as we speed along so I apologize for any fuzziness. 

Montana Roadside views

Montana Roadside views

Montana roadside

Montana roadside

Montana countryside

Montana countryside

The Yellowstone River again

The Yellowstone River again

We arrived in Miles City about 5 pm.

My cousin was not home so I called her cell phone and she was about 10 minutes way.  The air was pleasant so we waited. The grasshoppers were jumping around as we walked in the grass by her house.  The home was further north in the city than I remembered. She soon drove up in a large van that was dusty and dirty, typical of Montana.  She climbed out and we greeted each other warmly with a hug.  Her hair was no longer curly but looked pulled back.   I introduced her to my hubby. She introduced her little dog “Lady,” of four years.  Apparently Bear had died.  It made me sad.  I liked that little dog. 

The next day we headed up to Jordan and the ranch.  We were going to meet up with Bertha’s niece Gloria who was in the area fossil hunting.  I wanted them to get together.  This time I sat next to Bertha on the passenger side as she drove so I could hear her talk about the history of the area.

As we drove along to Jordan my cousin told us about the people who had lived there. The first ranch was the Moore family 5 miles out who moved into an old school-house at first.  There were the Rooney’s by Rock Springs. She mentioned McDonald’s. They lived there Sept-Nov over two years on the Belinkey Ranch and worked for Giddon Bickel brother to her brother-in-law. 

A view from the ranch

A view from the ranch

She called the different land formations “buttes” and mentioned that there were lots of snakes in them.  One was specifically called Snake Butte. She mentioned the creek’s along the way Upper and Lower Sand Creek, Dry Creek. Deadman’s Road where several dead men had been found, but it was not known what happened to them and how they died.  As we sped past the little towns she would mention the Post office.  Angela was not very big and had two buildings but it was considered a town.  There is Cohagen another town.  She pointed out the Sheepherder monument that had been put on top of one butte. 

On the way to Jordan

On the way to Jordan as the car is moving….

Clouds threatening

Clouds threatening

On the way to Jordan, a little reflection off the car windows.

On the way to Jordan, a little reflection off the car windows.

The land changed every five miles or more into something different.  As you leave Miles City you climb up a hill over the Yellowstone River bridge.  It travels passed the airport which is on the top of the hill over to the left as you go north to Jordan. Garfield county was carved out of several counties of which Dawson is the main one.  She told us that Garfield County was the biggest in the state and the least populated. 

She pointed out the community centers in the towns and the schools that were now all abandoned. She had walked five miles to school, to and from, in all kinds of weather as a child.  Rock Springs is were she held her wedding dance in one of the halls.

The highway signs counted down the miles to Jordan which made it easy to get a feel for our travel time.  I only saw one antelope by a fence that morning. There were lots of cattle out on the land, lots of fields that you could see where wheat was being cultivated and lots of different bales of hay and some were straw. My cousin explained that you could mix hay with straw to feed the cattle. Cattle can dig in the snow about six inches but any more than that and they have to be fed.  She mentioned that land could only handle some cattle or it would be overgrazed and it did affect the value of the land.  If the land was left alone it would come back in a year. 

While we waited to caught up with my cousin’s niece, we had a little tour of Jordan. Our goal was the Hilltop Cafe in Jordan for lunch and visiting.

The Courthouse in Jordan

The Courthouse in Jordan

We toured the town of Jordan. The courthouse was in red brick. Apparently there was a fire in 1997 and it almost took the records but a great many were stored off site so that helped a lot.  

We met up with the son who was at a table in the Hilltop Cafe. He was dressed in a T-shirt, flannel shirt, cowboy hat and seated.  He was a bit soiled in his clothing. I immediately went over and gave him a hug and greeted him.  He had claimed a big table and it would prove to be a good move on his part.  We all ordered coffee and I explained to waitress that we were expecting others so we would wait a while before we ordered. The son was trying to do the haying on the ranch but the rain was causing a slow down. 

Just as we started to order, the others arrived at the Hilltop and I was able recognize my cousin by her smile from a photo she had sent me.  Their trailer as having trouble so her husband was going to have to get that fixed.  We all went around and introduced each other and I hugged Gloria.  Note:  The Hilltop Cafe is on Facebook.

They were in Jordan searching for fossils.  They talked about the fossil hunting and what they were finding. I guess they removed them from the rock and then prepare them for sale?  They are trying to find a complete animal like a T-Rex.  They have found many bones – teeth, frog fossils etc.  

After lunch which we all went our various ways.  I went with my cousins in the van. We piled into the van with Lady and off we went to the ranch.  It is 20 miles from Jordan. As you come to the ranch you can see it and the road comes up past the corrals.  It was very muddy from the rain and there were big potholes filled with water that made the van slide around a little.  

My two cousins chatted away as we drove up the road. They talked about the schools, where there had been family picnics.  I talked about my research and trying to find out more about the Spracklin family in England.  Both cousins are into genealogy and the niece was working on the other side of the family lines that married into the Spracklins like the Heiss, Kibbee and more.  She had a book about the Kibbee family with her and shared that with us.  It was called the Kibbe Genealogical Note.

The ranch was as I remembered it minus a few buildings that had been burned down.  Amos’s homestead we toured but it is not safe and it will have to be destroyed.  It was a hard thing to do but necessary for it was falling down and not safe.  It was built in the late 1800’s and Amos had added the kitchen, porch and later the living room.  

On the Way to Jordan

The view from the Ranch

Our visit to the ranch was short and we returned to Miles City that evening.  This gave us time to do a little exploring of our own and I wanted to go back to the Range Rider Museum and take a good look.

The Range Rider Museum was opening at 10 am so about 10:30 we head out.  It was getting a little dark and raining some. We started in the gun collection and I studied the Winchester rifle and a Colt 45 which were supposedly the guns that might have killed my great-grandfather George A. Barclay.  So I tried some more photos but the glare from the overhead lights was too much.

Colt pistol

Colt pistol

 I returned to the main room and wandered about.  I went into the hallway and studied the faces in the great hall which are the inductees who are along the wall.  I took some pictures. 

The Gathering Hall, Range Rider Museum

The Gathering Hall, Range Rider Museum

Black and White photo boards of the Indians

Black and White photo boards of the Indians

I then went into the other part where I saw the Indian photos all in b&w of the Indian squaws, along with the Indian Chiefs and others. There was information about Fort Keogh, the rancher photos in the way back area, a whole area about brands of the ranchers, tools, a town scene of Mill Town and other dioramas. I went through the flip boards in the middle island that I missed the last time and there is a lot on bronco riding and rodeo in them as well as in the museum, articles about the Range Rider museum history. There was a saddles display and other cowboy items on display.  They did have book on the History of Custer County on the case.

We headed outside and saw the inside of another building with a wall devoted to the nurses of Holy Rosary up to about 1960. Hats and boots of various people, some ethnic families, ads of a saddle making shop. The last building housed old carriages and large pieces of equipment and furniture. 

Outbuildings at the Range Rider Museum

Outbuildings at the Range Rider Museum

I talked with Bob Bartholmess the director and asked a few questions. He said that the brands are assigned and you pay $100 then renewed every 10 years.  If a person dies their brand is only continued if the descendants renew it.  If not then it is reassigned. 

I told you there are different Barb wire configurations

I told you there are different Barb wire configurations

Brands

Brands

To become a member of the Hall in the back you need to be deceased, have family write a biography which is then reveal at an induction ceremony in June.  I am told you pay $300 in addition.  You have to be born before 1915 to get into it. I asked him how someone could get the information about the inductees and he said that they call him and he will give it a try.  It might take a while but they might be able to find something.  So it does take some time to dig into their files.  All inductees are in a book in the corner of the great hall.  http://www.rangeridersmuseum.com/

I wanted to get a tour of Miles City so we headed out to drive around and see the area.

Custer County Courthouse

Custer County Courthouse

The Park

The Park

The Olive Hotel

The Olive Hotel

We parked the car and tried walking in the downtown area of Miles City but the storm cloud was brewing and it started to rain as we headed for the Olive Hotel.  We went into the lobby and looked around. We asked if there was any rooms we could view but were told no. We then walked down to the Montana Bar and it was very beautiful inside with a dark wooden bar and booths.  The sky opened up at that time and just poured.  So we hung around hopefully waiting till it gave up but it was persistent, this cut short my tour.  The Montana Bar is on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/montanabarmcmt/

I had not realized that the Yellowstone River passed through Miles City, so we went in search of it.  My hubby really liked the Art Center in Miles City so we went to see that as well.

Miles City's version of the Yellowstone River

Miles City’s version of the Yellowstone River

We decided to try for the sandbar further up on the other side of the bridge that crossed the Yellowstone. There was a narrow dirt road with ruts that we eased the car onto and we managed to get down onto the rocky sandbar and I was relieved for you can get suck.  There were others with their cars parked on the sandbar.  It had a lot of rocks in it.  We walked over to the Yellowstone River and enjoyed the view.  The water was warm to the touch but it was shallow there at the shoreline.

The Art Center and how it looked when we were there.  http://wtrworks.org/  Apparently they have fixed it up from the photo that is on the website.  It was very nice inside so don’t let this photo discourage you.

WaterWorks Art Museum in Miles City

WaterWorks Art Museum in Miles City

The time had come to say goodbye to my cousin and we did that after breakfast. It was time to head west to Bozeman for the wedding.  It had been good to see my cousin again and as usual visiting with her is an adventure.

The Yellowstone River:  It does start in the Absaroka Range (Longmire fans note the reference). When I travel I like to follow the rivers.   http://www.britannica.com/place/Yellowstone-River

A map of the rivers of Montana – http://www.mapsofworld.com/usa/states/montana/montana-river-map.html

NOTE:  Well I messed up and published part II before part I.  So if you get a little confused just look for the Roman numerals and read in order I and then II and it will make sense.