On the Trail of the Muscallonge July 1897

A very kind individual sent me an article about George Barclay and Pine River taken from a journal written in 1897 and revisited  in the April/May 2005 issue of the MuskyHunter.com magazine.  George’s grandson, Keith, liked to fish and taught me how.

An article featuring Barclay's in Pine River in July of 1897...

An article featuring Barclay’s in Pine River in July of 1897…

…at 3:30 started on the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota R.R. for Pine River Station.  A logging train off the track ahead of us delayed us somewhat, and we did not reach Pine River until about 7 o’clock, too late to depart for Kabekona Camp that night.  We found Pine River a typical backwoods railroad station.  There are two houses in the town; one a log cabin, the other a hotel, saloon and general store combined.  Barclay, the owner of the hotel, does quite an extensive teaming business for the logging caps in the surrounding country, and, being a Down East Yankee, seems quite prosperous.  Around the saloon door was gathered a miscellaneous crowd of about a dozen lumber cruisers, loggers, Indians and teamsters, nearly all drunk or willing to become so.  After attending to our luggage and making arrangements for an early morning start for Kabekona we retired to our beds which we found clean  and comfortable enough. Tuesday morning dawned cloudy, wet and cold, but we determined to start anyway, as we had little affection for the crowd around Pine River.”

Source:  “On the Trail of the Muscallonge 19th Century Musky Hunters search for nirvana in the wilds of northern Minnesota.” Larry Ramsell, Research Editor Musky Hunter.com. April/May 2005 pg. 80 – 81. “Excerpted from the “New Muscallonge Waters,” July 10, 1897 Issue of Forest and Stream by W.P. Mussy.   This was a journal about a fishing party.

My Aunt Miriam writes in her notes regarding George:

“He had land–Pine River is on it now –ran a “stopping place” and equipped gippos. (A gippo was an independent logger.) 

Note:  Miriam misspelled the word gippos in her notes.  It is spelled “gyppo.”

 Wikipedia has a definition at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyppo_logger

Hmmm….this description of Pine River shows that it was a pretty rough place in 1897.

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