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Posts Tagged ‘R.Q.M.’

George Barclay served from August 15, 1862 to August 24, 1865.  He had 23 cards in his Civil War Service File with various numbers.  There was a #75 at the top of the summary card.  

D.C. Shoemaker a retired career military man who had served in the Quartermaster Department and a Civil War buff was kind to help me interpret some of the information on George’s Civil War service record cards.  D.C. and I were co-workers in years past and I was lucky to be able to sit with him and learn.  I have not had any military experience and D.C.’s help was greatly appreciated.  

D.C. began by pointing out that G.O. stands for “General Orders – “plan for attack.”  The other designation is S.O. (like S.O. 38) “Special Orders – “make part of another unit.”  

D.C. also explained that the term “muster” was more like a roll-call where they would line up the men and actually count them and physically take stock of what they had.  

George's Civil War Service Cards

 

1.  The Company Descriptive Book 

George Barclay, Co., I, 9 Reg’t Minnesota Inf.  

Description:  Age 18 years, height 5 feet 4-3/4 inches tall, Complexion: dark, Eyes: dark; hair dark . Where born:  Enfield Co., Conn. Occupation:  farmer 

Enlistment:  When:  Aug 15, 1862, Where: Shakopee, By Whom. Jos R. Ashley, term 3 y’rs, Remarks: none. J. Baker Copiest.  

The Civil War Pension file gives his weight at 125 lbs in 1892.  This information from his pension file, is of course years later.  As you can see he was not a large man.  

2.  Company Muster-in Roll:  

George Barclay, Wagoner, Co. I, 9 Reg’t Minnesota Inf. Age 18 years, Appears on 

Company Muster Roll of the organization named above.  Roll dated Fort Ridgely, Oct. 12, 1862.  Muster-in to date August 15, 1862.  

Joined for duty and enrolled: When Aug. 15, 1862, Where Shakopee, Minn. Period 3 years.  Bounty paid $25.00/100; due $ 0/100. Remarks: Premium paid $200; advanced pay $13.00. Signed J. B. Jones, Copyist.  

3.  Company Muster Roll Card 

George Barclay Wagoner, Co. I, 9 Reg’t Minnesota Infantry Appears on 

Company Muster Roll for Oct. 12 to Oct 31, 1862, Present, Remarks: Wagoner Q.M. Dept., signed J.B. Jones, Copyist.  

4.  Appears on Returns as follows:   

Return - A Summary

 

November, 1862. Teamster; Jan. 1863, Teamster in Q.M. Dept.; April 1863, Co. Cook. Oct. 1863. On extra duty in R.Q.M. Dept.; Dec. 1863, Acting Q.M. Serg’t.; Jan. to Sept. 1864, Mch, 1865 R.Q.M. Dept, *Appears also as Barklay & Barkly, signed C. H. Underwood, Copyist.   

Note:  R.Q.M refers to Regimental Quarter Master.  Teamster meant he drove the team. D.C. explained that as Acting Sergent at Q.M. it indicates that he was promoted to “brevet.” This means he had the title, the authority, but not the pay. 

5.  Company Muster Roll – Every card from this point on states he is a Wagoner with company I, 9th Reg’t. Minnesota Infantry. 

for from enlistment to Dec. 31, 1862, Present, sign J.B. Jones, Copyist.  

6.  Company Muster Roll 

for Jan. & Feb. 1863, Present, signed J.B. Jones, Copyist. 

7.  Company Muster Roll 

for March & April, 1863, Present, Remarks: Cook for Company, signed J.B. Jones, Copyist. 

8.  Special Muster Roll 

for dated April 11, 1863, Present, signed J.B. Jones, Copyist. 

9.  Company Muster Roll 

for May & June, 1863, Present, signed J.B. Jones, Copyist. 

Note:  D.C. thought he was put on light duty because he could have been sick or injured. 

10.  Company Muster Roll 

for July & Aug. 1863, Present, signed J.B. Jones, Copyist.  

11.  Company Muster Roll 

for Sept. & Oct., 1863, Present, Remarks: Daily duty Q.M. Dept., signed J.B. Jones, Copyist.  

12.  Company Muster Roll 

for Nov. & Dec. 1863, Present, Remarks: Daily duty in Q.M. Dept., signed J.B. Jones, Copyist.   

13.  Company Muster Roll 

for Jan. & Feb. 1864, Present, Remarks: Daily duty in Q.M. Dept., signed Howel, Copyist.   

14.  Company Muster Roll 

for Mch. & Apr. 1864, Present, Remarks: Daily duty in Q.M. Dept., signed Howel, Copyist.   

 15.  Company Muster Roll 

for May & June, 1864, Present, Remarks: On daily duty in Q.M. Dept., signed Howel, Copyist.   

16.  Company Muster Roll 

for July & Aug, 1864, Present, signed Howel, Copyist.   

17.  Company Muster Roll 

for Sept. & Oct, 1864, Present, Remarks: On daily duty in Q.M. Dept., signed Howel, Copyist. 

18.  Company Muster Roll 

for Nov. & Dec. 1864, Absent.  Remarks:  “On [D.S.] with Brigade Quartermaster since November 22, 1864, signed Howell, Copyist.  

19.  Apears on Muster Roll of enlisted men on detached service at Hd. Qrs. 2 Brig., 1 Div. , Detachment, Army of Tenn. 

Muster Roll - Army of Tenn

 

for Nov. & Dec., 1864, Station: in the field Tenn. Present, Detailed from Co. I, 9th Minn, Infy in Q.M.D. SO. 38 Hd Qrs. 2d Bridg. 1st Div 16, A.C. November 22, 1864, signed Granes, Copyist.  

Note:  Sherman’s March to the Sea started on Nov. 15, 1864! 

20. Company Muster Roll 

for Jan & Feb. 1865, Present, signed Howell, Copyist.  

21. Company Muster Roll 

for Mch & Apr. 1865, Present, signed Howell, Copyist. 

22. Company Muster Roll 

for May & June, 1865, Present, signed Howell, Copyist.  

23.  Co. Muster-out Roll dated 

Ft. Snelling Minn. Aug. 24, 1865, Muster-out date, Aug. 24, 1865, Last paid to Feb. 28, 1865.  Clothing account: due U.S. $10.72/100.  Bounty paid $25.00; due $75.00. Remarks.  Retains knapsack, haversack (like a duffel bag) and canteen, under provisions of G.O. No. 114 C.S. A.G.O. 

Note:  C.S.A.G.O means Chief of Staff, Adj. General Office.  

Mustering Out

 

Based on this service record, I don’t think George was at Vicksburg which was fought from March to July 1863 and he wasn’t at Chattanooga which was in late 1863.  

D.C. wrote to me in an email, in March of 2001, to help me understand the structure of the military units in the Civil War: 

Here goes:  A regiment was the smallest independent unit at that time.  Regiments have (usually small) numbers like the 3rd Infantry or the 10th Artillery.  A regiment might have as few as one battalion or as many as eight.  Each battalion might have from two to five companies, each with a letter, starting with A, B, and so on.  Company letters would run in succession through the regiment; a second battalion might have companies D, E, and F, with the next battalion having G, H and so on.  Each company would have two to four platoons of about 40 men each, numbered 1st platoon, 2nd platoon, etc. which will give you an idea of the size.  So from smallest to largest, it runs platoon, company, battalion, regiment, division, and army.  Regiments could be formed into divisions of two or more regiments, pretty much at will.  Platoons always stayed with their companies, and companies always stayed with their battalions, but regiments could be switched around at times.  The composition of a regiment or a division might be hard to pinpoint without some official history from the time or the area and territorial forces would be less well documented than state’s divisions.” 

Another website gives even more details on the structure of the military in the Civil War:  http://www.civilwarhome.com/armyorganization.htm 

Armies, Corps, Divisions, Brigades, Infantry Regiments 

So what is the Army of the Tennessee?  Back to Wikipedia for a description:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army_of_the_Tennessee

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