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Ellen Barclay lived another 10 years after her husband John Barclay.  She died in 1907.

In this post I want to share what I know about Ellen, because I think it fits with John Barclay’s end of life.  They had been together 29-30 years and had 4 children.  The children were Charles, William, Mary E., Anna Elizabeth.  I will go into more detail on the lives of John Barclay’s children from both marriages, when I get to the death of Alexander Barclay who was a half-brother to Ellen’s children and full brother to the first seven, Margaret’s children.  Alexander left a very involved probate file when he died in 1906.  He was George Angus Barclay’s full brother and my great grandfather and subject of this blog.

Her name has been a frustration because documents have her as Helen or Ellen.  The writing was so bad you could not read it.  The tombstone has her name as Ellen so I will use that name.  In John Barclay’s obituary notice it was said that her maiden name was Iverson but in her own obituary it is listed as Stevenson.  It is possible she was married before John, but so far I do not see any evidence for a first marriage for Ellen.  It is also possible that the use of Iverson was a mistake.  I am choosing to go with Ellen Stevenson Barclay till I am sure.

There is so much more research to do on Ellen Stevenson Barclay. I wish I had the time.  Ellen is the second wife of John Barclay and I do not descend from her.  I descend from Margaret  and frankly I am more interested in finding the origins of John Barclay and his first wife Margaret.  So I present what I have learned about Ellen for those who would be interested.

In order to understand Ellen’s life you need to review some of the posts I have written about John Barclay.  She will be featured in census and other documents like deeds, etc.  You can find other posts by using the search box on the right of this blog.  You can also seek out the Categories on the right of this blog and under SURNAMES you will find “Barclay Surnames.”   From there scroll down and you will find John Barclay and Ellen/Helen Stevenson.  Unfortunately the names are alpha order rather than by the lineage.

So what happened to Ellen after John’s death?

In 1898, after John’s death, Ellen Barclay (widow) rents her land to her son Charles Barclay on 29 August 1898

$100 yearly for years during the life of the party of the first part to be paid on April first and Jany first of each year.  The NW atr of the NE qtr of Sec 23, Twp. 115, Range 22, according to the government survey thereof.  Also said party reserves the use of two rooms in the building on the above property, use of the present garden, also parture, barn, corn and feed for one cow, poultry 

Source:  Deed of Indenture Ellen Barclay to Charles Barclay, Aug 29, 1898, Vol. 47, pg. 287 #11684, FHL# 1255725, Scott County, Minnesota

On 13 February 1899 another son William Barclay sells his share of the land to his brother Charles.

For a sum of $1800.00, Wm. and wife Clara E. Barclay are residing in Mammoth, Madison Co., Montana sold to Charles Barclay residing in Eagle Creek, Scott Co., Montana to-wit, the south 1/2 of the NE qtr of Sec. 23, Twp. 115, Range 22, 80 acres according to gov. survey.  Except a certain mortgage payable to Henry Hinds of Shakopee. Witnessed by W.R. Macfadden and F. H. Wilbour and signed by William Barclay and Clara E. Barclay in the State of Montana, County of Madison etc.

Source:  Deed of Wm. Barclay and wife Clara E. to Charles Barclay, February 13, 1899, Vol. 47, pg. 33 #12062, Scott Co., Minnesota, FHL #1255727.

After John’s death in 1897, we find that the next census is the 1900 U.S. Federal Census.  In this census we learn that Ellen was living with her son Charles.  This census shows us that the only child that is still around is Charles. The remaining three children of John and Ellen have married and migrated elsewhere.  William and Mary E. went to Montana.  Anna married and went to Wisconsin to live.  Charles is a mystery.  After his mother’s death it is difficult to determine where he went.  There are possibilities for a Charles Barclay living in Minneapolis/St. Paul.

28/28 Barcley, Charlie, Head, Jan. 1860, 40 years old, single, born in Minnesota, Father born in Scotland, mother born in Norway, farmer, educated, land info.  Barcley, Ellen, mother born Apr 1833, 67 years widow, one child born, one child living, born in Norway and both parents where born in Norway. Naturalized 1858, 45 years in country (means she immigrated in 1855), educated.  Carter, John, Nephew born Feb. 1890 10 years, single.  Born in Wisconsin, Father born in Canada Fr., mother Minnesota, at school, 8 grade, educated.

Source:  Charlie Barclay & Mother, 1900 U.S. Federal Census,  Eagle Creek, Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota, FHL#1240788, Microfilm T623, Roll 788, page 142, SD ?, ED 172, Sheet #2.  I do not understand the number of children fro Ellen in this census.  All her children lived long lives?

Something happened in 1904 because a notice in the gossip column of the Scott County Argus was featured on May 20, 1904.  I have no idea what this means?

“Eagle Creek: Charles Barclay has moved his household furniture into Shakopee, and will make that his future home.  Charlie was always kind and obliging to everyone and we will all miss his happy smile very much.”

In 1906 he is still living in Shakopee per his half-brother Alexander Barclay’s probate case. This probate will be featured indepth at a later time on this blog.

Charles Barclay, aged 45 years, residing at Shakopee, Minn., who is a half-brother.

Ellen passes on 30 November 1907 in Shakopee.  She is buried with John in the Valley Cemetery in Shakopee. You see that they use the name Helen in the obituary notice but Ellen is on the tombstone.

Helen Barclay Death Notice Shakopee Tribune Dec. 13, 1907 pg. 4 col 3 Maiden: Stevenson also in the Argus on Dec 6, 1907 pg. 1 and col 4.

Helen's 2nd Obituary Notice

Helen’s 2nd Obituary Notice

Died – Barclay – At her home in this city, Saturday, November the 30th, Mrs. Helen Barclay of heart disease. Aged 73 years. Helen Stevenson was born in Norway in 1834, and came to this country in 1849(39?) settling in Wisconsin, then Iowa, finally coming to Minnesota in 1848. She moved to Shakopee in 1850 with her husband, John Barclay, and was one of the early pioneer settlers of Shakopee. Mrs. Barclay leaves four children to mourn her loss. They are: Mrs. Mary Clark of Montana, Mrs. Anna E. Carter of Marynette, Wis.; and Charles at home, and William Barklay of Montana. The funeral was held from the residence, Tuesday, at two o’clock in the afternoon, Rev. Mr. Ganschow officiating. We extend our sincere sympathy to the bereaved children.

2nd Obit – Scott Co. Argus – Friday, Dec. 6, 1907 – Died – Mrs. Helen Barclay, whose maiden name was Stevenson, died at her home in this city, Saturday, November 30th, 1907, of heart failure. Deceased had been in poor health for several months past, but not until two days prior to death did her condition give cause for alarm. Mrs. Barclay was a native of Norway, where she was born April 25, 1834. She came to America in 1849 and has resided in Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota. Her husband, John Barclay, and she were pioneer settlers in Scott county where the family is well-known. For several years past Mrs. Barclay has made her home in Shakopee with her son Charles, who survives her together with another son, William of Montana, and two married daughters. The funeral took place, Tuesday afternoon, at two o’clock, from the family residence, Rev. Carl Ganschow officiating, and interment was in the Valley Cemetery.

Helen's obituary notice Dec 1907.

Helen’s obituary notice Dec 1907.

The above information gives us some good information on Ellen/Helen Iverson/Stevenson.  Ellen left a probate file and will.  I will present that in the next post.

Note:  I was having a great deal of trouble researching the early years of the state of Minnesota and when it was a territory and was unable to find an actual marriage for John and Ellen in the records.  Minnesota went through a lot of changes before it became a state and was associated with records of a territorial nature of Michigan and Wisconsin.  The counties also changed their boundaries.   Here is a Wikipedia article that might help to get you started on researching in Minnesota http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Minnesota

The other problem is that not a lot of documents have been filmed by the Family History Library for some of the counties of Minnesota.  So access to the documents is onsite.  I have traveled to Minnesota three times and would love to go back for more research, we will see.

Me at the Minnesota Historical Society 2007, my third time there.

Me at the Minnesota Historical Society 2007, my third time there.

John and Ellen Barclay are both buried in Valley Cemetery in Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota.  Finding Valley Cemetery was not an easy task for I did this back in 2007.

Here is a Google map that shows where the cemetery is located:

Location of Valley Cemetery

Location of Valley Cemetery

Find A Grave has a listing of Valley Cemetery about 82% photographed, along with a map of the location.   There is a picture of the tombstone of John and Ellen taken in 2010 and it is looking a little worse for wear.  My photos were taken in 2007.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=83757&CScn=Valley+&CScntry=4&CSst=25&CScnty=1379&

When my husband and I arrived at the cemetery in June of 2007, we went to the location given in the cemetery publication I had found.  I searched and searched but did not find the tombstone.  Luckily my husband is very good at finding things in cemeteries.  He found the stone in a different location.

We first looked at lot E 1/2 lot 94.  See the white arrow on the map below.  Instead, the tombstone was in the South end section 7 Row 16 near a Sam Woods, Ronald Brown etc.  It is closer to the cemetery shed and farther from the house on the left.   See the red arrow.

Google Earth Photo of Valley Cemetery in Minnesota

Google Earth Photo of Valley Cemetery in Minnesota

Go in at the entrance sign and go straight back past the shed.

Entering Valley Cemetery in Shakopee, MN

Entering Valley Cemetery in Shakopee, MN

Here is the tombstone that I saw in June of 2007.  It had lost its finial at the top but it was not leaning like the Find A Grave photo.

John & Ellen Barclay's Stone

John & Ellen Barclay’s Stone

Here are closer views of the inscription on the tombstone.

John Barclay and Ellen Barclay, Valley Cemetery

John Barclay and Ellen Barclay, Valley Cemetery

It reads:  John Barclay born Mar 18, 1801, Died Dec 25, 1897.  Ellen Barclay born April 25, 1831, Died Nov. 30, 1907.

The next photograph is closer to Ellen’s information.  The name of John’s second wife has been a lot of trouble.  Here it is written as Ellen, but her estate file has it as Helen, sigh!  We can go with the information on the tombstone or keep an open mind about other records that use Helen.

Ellen Barclay's information

Ellen Barclay’s information

I took this picture so that one could use the houses in the background to find the tombstone quickly.

Tombstone of John and Ellen Barclay

Tombstone of John and Ellen Barclay

Here is a picture of me next to the tombstone of my 2nd great-grandfather John Barclay.  Ellen was his second wife and I descend from the first whose name was Margaret.  Little is known about Margaret unfortunately.

Bonnie at the grave of her great grandfather John Barclay, Valley Cem, MN

Bonnie at the grave of her great-grandfather John Barclay, Valley Cemetery, MN

George’s father, John Barclay, passed away on 25 December, 1897.  I tried to find out if George attended the funeral but I did not have any luck with the newspaper gossip columns in Pine River and in Shakopee.  He is barely mentioned in the obituary.

The last time I posted on my 2nd great-grandfather John Barclay, I talked about his Civil War service in several posts and caught up with the happenings in Eagle Creek, Scott County, Minnesota.

There are many more posts on John Barclay that were done early in this blog so check on the Categories on the right side.  These were the most recent.

1.  Catching up with the Barclay’s of Eagle Creek Twp., February 12, 2012

2. The 1890 Census and Veterans Schedules – John Barclay dated February 25, 2012

3.  Rejected Claim:  John Barclay’s Civil War Pension!, dated March 11, 2012.

In 1894, John and his wife Ellen/Helen, sell land to a Charles G. Bowish of Shakopee, Minnesota.  They receive $1 from this person which might imply some relationship?

For the sum of $1.00 convey the following land:  The north half of the NE qtr of Section 23 in township 115 of range 22.  Except a mortgage thereon and on their lands, payable to Henry Hinds.  Witnessed by Charles G. Hinds and E. J. [Affolter] and signed by John Barclay and Helen Barclay etc.

Source:  John Barclay & Wife to Charles G. Bowdish of Shakopee City, Minnesota, 21 June 1894, Vol. 39 pg. 227 Instrument #1304, Scott Co., Minnesota FHL#1255725. 

In the Minnesota State Census of 1895 we find the family of John Barclay to be as follows:

Family #54:  Barclay, John, age 94, male, white, born in Scotland, Resident of state 45 years, 45 years in enumeration district, occupation none, mother and father both of foreign birth.  Barclay, Ellen, age 65, female, white, born in Norway, both parents of foreign birth.  Barclay Charlie, age 35, male, white, born in Minnesota.  In state and enumeration district 35 years, a farmer, employed 12 mos of the year.  Both parents of foreign birth.

Source:  Family of John Barclay, 1895 Minnesota State Census, Eagle Creek, Scott County, Minnesota, pg. 2, Schedule #5, Enumerated on the 10th day of June 1895. FHL#565810. 

In 1898 the Every Name Index to the Scott Co. Atlas of 1898 has Barclay listed and we find Helen Barclay and William Barclay are the owners of the land.

John is not there but Helen and William are? 1898 Plat Book

John is not there but Helen and William are? 1898 Plat Book

John Barclay appears in the Vital Record and Indexes of 1853-1972 for Scott County, Minnesota – Death Records. Vols. A-C 1871-1907, FHL#1379418.

Index: Barclay, John, line 25, Dec. 25, 1897, Book B, pg. 24, line 146.

Register of Deaths in the Town of Eagle Creek, Scott Co., Minnesota
1897 line 6 Dec. 25, 1897 John Barclay, Male, White, married, 96 years old, born in Scotland, Name of parents John and [Mary], parents birthplace Scotland, cause of death old age, Date of record Jan, 3, 1898. Copies of the register at the Scott Co. Historical Society, June 2007.

Much to my delight I did find an obituary notice on John in the Scott County Argus newspaper for December 30, 1897 page 4 column 1.  George is alluded to but not named like his brother Alexander.

John Barclay's Obiturary 1897

John Barclay’s obituary 1897

BARCLAY – At the home of his son Charles , in Eagle Creek, Saturday, Dec. 25, 1897, of old age, John Barclay, aged ninety-six years.  Deceased was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the 18th day of March, 1801, and the first forty years or more of his life were spent in his native land.  By his first wife seven children were born to him; and in the 40’s the family, diminished by the loss of the wife and mother, came to America.  All these children are still living, one, Alexander, being a resident of Dakota county, another lives elsewhere in this state, three live in Connecticut, and two in the far west.  As early as 1848 John Barclay located at Fort Ridgely, in the then wilderness of the great Minnesota territory, and in 1853 he came to Eagle Creek and took up a claim.  Some years later he married Ellen Iverson, who with four children survives him.  These children are Charles, at home; William located at Pony, Mont.; Mary, at Butte, Mont.; and Annie, now Mrs. David Carter, of Marinette, Wis.  Of these only Charles and Mrs. Carter were able to be at the funeral.  This took place Tuesday afternoon from the Presbyterian church, Rev. J.B. Ferguson officiating, an the remains were followed to their last resting place in the Valley Cemetery by neighbors and may friends of the early pioneer days.

Note:  There was also a funeral notice in the Dec. 31, 1897 Shakopee Tribune under Local

“Died: — John Barclay died at the home of his son Charles, in Eagle Creek township last’ Saturday at the advanced age of 96 years.  Funeral took place from the Presbyterian church last Tuesday; Rev. Ferguson officiating. “

In searching the court Probate records for Scott County, I did not find a will or probate/estate file for John Barclay.  I did find one for his wife in 1907.  John had sold land to his wife about 1867 and there are deeds in which he sold land to his sons.  This means that he probably didn’t have enough money to have a probate; however, there should be a court record of  dismissal if that was the case.  So I am not sure what happened?

George is involved in another round of politics in 1897 regarding the organization of Cass County. Of course George A. Barclay wanted Pine River to be the county seat.  He was too late in organizing the convention to vote on that subject. This notice for a convention to choose a county seat for Cass appeared in the  Cass County Pioneer newspaper in July of 1897 somewhat hidden in back pages.

A convention for choosing a county seat in Cass Co., MN

A convention for choosing a county seat in Cass Co., MN

Notice:  Pursuant to notice duly given calling a non-partisan convention for the county of Cass for the purpose of selecting a location for a county seat to be voted on at a coming special election.  Said convention was called to order by Wm. H. Hallett, who was elected chairman.  A. J. Collins was elected clerk.  After seating the delegates the chairman was authorized to retain an able attorney to look after an direct the petitioners who wish to change the county seat.  One hundred dollars was raised for current expenses, Geo. Barclay of Pine River giving his check for $50.  Owing to the inclemency of the weather, but twenty of the sixty delegates attended. Those present, wishing to give every part of  the county a chance to vote on this important question.  The convention was adjourned until the 21st of June 1897 to meet at the Ellis post office school house on section 7 town 135, range 31, at 2 o’clock p.m.  On said date the delegates present will proceed to select a site for a new county seat.  All precincts are requested to have their delegates attend said adjourned convention.  Dated at County convention this the day of June, 1897 A Collins, Sec.  Wm. H. Hallet, Chm.

Source:  Notice, Cass County Pioneer Newspaper, Walker, MN, Film June 17, 1897, #1/2/1897 to 6/2/1898, Thursday, July 15, 1897 edition, Minnesota Historical Society newspaper collection.

I return to the Logsleds to Snowmobiles book about the history of Pine River on page 110 lower part of the first column:

“The governor appointments as Cass County Commissioners those who “will organize the county and decide the county seat” consisted of men all friendly to the timber interests.

It soon became obvious to George Barclay and others that “timber forces” were in control of the politics of the county, at least temporarily, for on May 14, 1897, the boom town of Walker which had been in existence for only a little over a year was “named” by the new commissioners the county seat of Cass County. 

Barclay, together with W.H. Hallett immediately called a “non-partisan convention” at the Collins House precinct south of Barclay’s Ranch for the purpose of “selecting a location for the county’s seat.”  Barclay had high hopes that the “convention” would select his settlement in place of Walker, and, therefore, he readily contributed $50 to defray part of the $100 convention expense.  Apparently, he hoped that in an election resulting from the conflict over two alternative county seats that the more populated southern portions of the county would outvote the northern region.  Barclay was to be disappointed for the hastily called convention could not agree on any single policy and broke up without taking positive stand on an alternative county seat.”  From the Brainerd Dispatch June 18, 1897, pg. 4, Logsleds bibliography notes pg, 516. 

According to the Cass County Historical Society the reason Walker was named the county seat was because it was incorporated in 1896 having 100 male voters.  Pine River had not yet incorporated and that would not happen till 1901.

UPDATE July 11, 2013:  Apparently I have written this post 2 times.  I apologize for that confusion.  I wrote about the County Seat of Cass on March 21, 2013.  So I am adding the last part of that post to this one and then deleting the March post.

Once Walker was chosen as the county seat of Cass County, Minnesota the next step was to incorporate Pine River.  It took a few years for that to happen.

The Logsleds Book Continues on page 111:

“It is not known when George Barclay first conceived of the idea of incorporating his settlement into a village, but is certain that by the time of the official organization of Cass County in 1897, he had definite plans on his mind.”

A very kind individual sent me an article about George Barclay and Pine River taken from a journal written in 1897 and revisited  in the April/May 2005 issue of the MuskyHunter.com magazine.  George’s grandson, Keith, liked to fish and taught me how.

An article featuring Barclay's in Pine River in July of 1897...

An article featuring Barclay’s in Pine River in July of 1897…

…at 3:30 started on the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota R.R. for Pine River Station.  A logging train off the track ahead of us delayed us somewhat, and we did not reach Pine River until about 7 o’clock, too late to depart for Kabekona Camp that night.  We found Pine River a typical backwoods railroad station.  There are two houses in the town; one a log cabin, the other a hotel, saloon and general store combined.  Barclay, the owner of the hotel, does quite an extensive teaming business for the logging caps in the surrounding country, and, being a Down East Yankee, seems quite prosperous.  Around the saloon door was gathered a miscellaneous crowd of about a dozen lumber cruisers, loggers, Indians and teamsters, nearly all drunk or willing to become so.  After attending to our luggage and making arrangements for an early morning start for Kabekona we retired to our beds which we found clean  and comfortable enough. Tuesday morning dawned cloudy, wet and cold, but we determined to start anyway, as we had little affection for the crowd around Pine River.”

Source:  “On the Trail of the Muscallonge 19th Century Musky Hunters search for nirvana in the wilds of northern Minnesota.” Larry Ramsell, Research Editor Musky Hunter.com. April/May 2005 pg. 80 – 81. “Excerpted from the “New Muscallonge Waters,” July 10, 1897 Issue of Forest and Stream by W.P. Mussy.   This was a journal about a fishing party.

My Aunt Miriam writes in her notes regarding George:

“He had land–Pine River is on it now –ran a “stopping place” and equipped gippos. (A gippo was an independent logger.) 

Note:  Miriam misspelled the word gippos in her notes.  It is spelled “gyppo.”

 Wikipedia has a definition at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyppo_logger

Hmmm….this description of Pine River shows that it was a pretty rough place in 1897.

George tried again in April of 1897 for his Civil War Pension.  I refer you to the post I wrote on July 15, 2012 titled “George Barclay Seeks His Civil War Pension.”  In that post I did a list of the documents in the pension file that covered the time period of 1891 to 1895.  George’s first attempt at securing his Civil War pension.

1, On April 5, 1897 he again filled out the “Declaration for Invalid Pension” form

Soldier’s Application, George Barclay, I 9 Minn Inf. Pine River, Crown Wing Co., Minn.  Filed by H.D. Phillips Law Offices, (Stamped several times April 10, 1897, and April 20, 1897.)  Minnesota, Crow Wing, 5 April 1897 in the Dist. Court a record for George Barclay aged 52, resides at Pine River, County of Crow Wing, State of Minnesota, identical person who enrolled on the 15 Day of August 1862 in 1st Lt. M. Greenleaf’s Company I 9th Regiment, Minnesota, Infantry, as Wagoner in the war of the Rebellion and served at least ninety days and was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling Minn on the 24th of August 1865.  

That he is unable to earn a support by reason of Disease of Spine, partial Deafness, kidney trouble and weakness of lower limbs. Pension Application 1066560.  Signed in Pine River, Crow Wing Co., Minnesota by George Barclay and Attested by Louis [Zachering] and John F. [Frakes].  Louis [Doche] residing in Brainerd and John F. [Frater] also residing in Brainerd both knew claimant 14 years.  Signed by these men on 5th April 1897.  Prosecution of this claim by a Sam’l Parker, Clerk Dist. Crt, Crown Wing Co., Minn. 

2. On April 10, 1897 at the bottom another document has a big “ABANDONED” written across it.

NOTE:  Next in the file was the Timber Contract that I shared in the May 16, 2013 post, “Right of Way Brainerd & Northern RR October 1895 and the Timber Contract with NPRR in July 1897.” Why this Timber Contract was in the pension file I do not know.

3. A year later on April 28, 1898 a Department of Interior document was in the file.  Two of the same type of document.

1st form:  Western Div. Inv. Orig. No. 1066560 I 9 Reg’t Minn. Inf. April 28, 1898, Surgeons: 1st National Bank Block Sixth Str., Brainerd, Crow Wing Co., Minn. 10 o’clock am, every 1st and 2nd Wednesday of each month.  Signed by [H. Clay Evans] Commissioner.  Claimant:  George Barclay, Pine River, Crown Wing Co., Minn. Examined by [J.S. Camps], [Wemer Hemstead] and [A.F. Graves] 18 May 1898, signed by [Wemer Hemstead]. 

2nd form reads:  April 28, 1898 Mr. George Barclay, late a Wagoner Co. I, 9 Regt, Minn. Inf. Original #1066560, disease of spine, partial deafness, kidney troubles and weakness of lower limbs or any other disability.  Sign by W. Hemstead, Brainerd, Crown Wing Co. Minn. Claimant’s Post office:  Pine River, Crown Wing Co., Minn. 

George's Civil War Pension 2nd try 1897-98

George’s Civil War Pension 2nd try 1897-98

4. Followed by another larger document from the Department of the Interior asking questions of George.

Western Div. Inv Orig #1066560, George Barclay Co. I, 9th Reg’t. Minn Inf. Dated April 28, 1898. Mr. George Barclay, Pine River, MNN.  Signed by H. Clay Evans.  Are you a married man.  Answer: Amarilla Spracklen.  When, Where and by whom were you married:  Herbert Root. What record of marriage exists: married cerifect.  Were you previously married:  none.  Have you any children living:  Gracie A. Barclay Aprile 10, 1 o’clock 1882., Date of reply Af 6, 1898, signed by George Barclay.  

NOTE:  I featured this documents when I posted about Grace and her birth on May 23, 2011, “A daughter is born: Grace Amarilla 1882.” Since I do not have a birth record for Grace, my grandmother, this document serves as the acknowledgement that Amarilla was his wife and Grace (Gracie) was his daughter.  The document was in George’s handwriting  and signed by him.

5. The next month on May 18, 1898 he once again had a medical examination and the information was written on the Surgeon’s Certificate.

Surgeon’s Certificate, I, 9th Reg’t., Minn. Inf. Applicant for Original #1066560, Date of Examination May 18, 1898 Signed by J.S. Camp, Pres., Wemer Hemstead, Sec., A. G. Groves, Treas. (Board), PO:  Brainerd, County: Crow Wing, State Minnesota.

Original #1066560, George Barclay, Wagoner, Co. I, 9th Reg’t, Minn. Inf., Brainerd, Minn, Pine River, Minn. May 18th, 1898.  Disability:  Disease of Spine, Deafness, Kidney trouble, and weakness of lower limbs.  

Here is my partial summary of what was written on the Surgeon’s Certificate:  height 5 feet 4 1/2 inches; weight 130 pounds, age 54 years.  

a.  Disease of spine, no objective symptoms, no disability

b.  Deafness: can hear with both ears ordinary conversation at six feet, no disability

c.  Kidney trouble, no objective symptoms, no disability

d.  Weakness of lower limbs:  exaggerated knee reflex, no difference in measurement of legs, walks with difficulty and stiffness Rate 6/18.

f.  Disease of Urinary organs and other body parts:  he was given a rate of 4/18 and 6/18 respectively.  He had some problems that I am not going to share here.

g.  No evidence of vicious habits. 

Signatures of the 3 physicians at the bottom. 

There are no more documents regarding this attempt to obtain the pension by George himself  till November 21, 1898 and that one is under Amarilla’s name and called a Power of Attorney.

There will be more posts on this Civil War pension process from November 1898 to 1939.  All Amarilla’s attempt at securing her husband’s pension.

George Barclay’s Ranch was smack in a location that required that he have dealings with the railroads. We have seen this before in 1883 when he signed a deed for land.

The Logsleds to Snowmobile book about the history of Pine River mentions the Railroad and the right of way.

When the railroad actually arrived at Barclay’s in August, 1894, the right-of-way divided his buildings with the house and trading post west of the tracks and the hotel to the east.  The Barclay’s eventually donated to the B&NMRy 100 feet on either side of the track on condition that their buildings within the right-of-way be moved at railroad expense.” pg. 110 second column lower right.

There is a deed regarding this very thing dated 24, October 1895.

Right of Way

Right of Way

Source:  Right of way Deed, George A. Barclay and Wife vs. Brainerd & Northern Railroad, October 24, 1895 at 10 am. Book N, pg. #157 #3237, Cass County Courthouse, Register of Deeds, Walker, MN.

Know all [ ] by others presents that George Barclay and Amarilla Barclay, his wife of Cass County, State of Minnesota, for and in Consideration of one dollar with in Law paid by the Brainerd and Northern Minnesota Railway Company the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, do hereby grant, bargain, sell and convey unto the said Company this succession and assigns, a strip belt or piece of land, one hundred feet wide, extending across the following described tracts of land in Cass County, State of Minnesota, described as follows to wit:

Lot No. (6) of Section No. 8, the south east quarter of the northwest quarter (SE1/4 of NW1/4), and the North half of the Northwest quarter (N1/2 of NW1/4) of Section No. 6 – all in Township No. 137 of Range No. 29; and Lot No. Seven (7); of Section No. 21 in Township No. 138 of Range No. 29 hereby conveying a strip of land fifty feet wide on each side of the center line of said Company as now located and established. Including also a strip or piece of land fifty (50 Feet in with, situate and extending along an adjoining the west five of the above described right of way through and across the named tract in the Northwest quarter of Section No. 6 in Township No. 137 of Range No. 29. Said cash [ ] price being in addition of the 100 feet in width of the right of way above conveyed and with Right to said Company its succession and assigns to protect any cuts which may be made on said land by erecting on both sides thereof portable Snow Fences: provided however, that such…

Unfortunately, the 2nd page is missing so we don’t get the whole story.  This happens when you are doing research and having to move real fast.

Several years later, George on 19 July 1897, George entered into a contract with the Northern Pacific Railroad regarding timber.

Made on the 19th Day of July, 1897 between Edwin H. McHenry, Frank G. Bigelow as Receivers of the NPRR and Geo. A. Barclay of Pine River, MN, $50.00 to cut and remove pine timber suitable for saw logs on the following lands:  Twp 137, Range 30 etc. Not to include the cutting of Tamarac, Oak or Jack Pine.  Does not prevent the sale of other timber.  Signed by Barclay, Whitesides, Frank Vogel, and the Federal Land agent.

Timber Contract Northern Pacific RR

Portion of the Timber Contract Northern Pacific RR

A copy of this contact was in his Civil War pension file.

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