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Archive for the ‘Brainerd’ Category

Pine River News

Besides their interests in Longville about this time, life pretty much went on in Pine River. I am always fascinated with their movements and comings and goings.

1.  Mrs. Dawes opens a millinery store and visits her daughter in Grand Rapids, 22 April 1904.

2.  Mrs. Dawes stepped on a nail, September 1904.

3.  Mrs. Dawes and Mrs. McDonald went to Brainerd with the children, September 1904.

4. J.G. Dawes went to the Twin Cities and returned, Nov. 1904.

5. Masked ball at the Barclay Hall, masks are on sale at the Post Office, Dec. 1904.

Anyone for dancing….!!!

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PINE RIVER – OLD LOG STORE

“The old log store built by Geo. Barclay in 1877 and the first store on the Leech Lake tote road, is being moved off the right-of-way by the railroad company.”

This piece of news was found on the front page of the Pine Tree Blaze on January 15, 1904

Old Log Store of G.A. Barclay

Old Log Store of G.A. Barclay

Here is a very nice article about the Leech Lake Trail in Beltrami County which is north of Cass.

http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~woss/trail/leechtr.html

Pine River History

http://www.pineriverhistory.org/5.html

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Widows Application 1898

Widows Application 1898 portion of…

On November 21, 1898 Amarilla tried again for George’s Civil War pension remember that George tried at least twice to get this money but failed.  She filed the Declaration for Widow’s Pension in the county of Crow Wing with the help of Henry D. Philips Law Offices of Washington D.C.

Something happened because the claim had the word ABANDONED stamped a on December 9, 1898 document and several others.

Apparently on 21 November 1900, J.G. Dawes appears on another Declaration of Widow’s Pension with Amarilla.   J.G. Dawes was the notary public at the bottom of the form.  So J.G. tried to help her out.

Several other documents followed from friends and a physician.  They are very interesting and I wonder what stories these people would have told about George and Amarilla.

General Affidavit of Bertha Mickelson, 25 February 1901.

That she was well acquainted with George Barclay deceased for a period of 4 years before his death.  That in the evening of October 29, 1898 about half pass seven o’clock said George Barclay was shot and killed by a person unknown at the time he was sitting in a chair in his own house.  I heard the report of the gun saw him fall and he expired on the floor where he fell.  The ball passed through his neck.  The shot was fired from outside of building and was fired through a window. 

The Physician’s Affidavit was signed by T. F. [Rodwell] M.D. on the 7th of August 1901.

That he is a practicing physician and that he has been acquainted with the said soldier two years, and that he was a man then whose general appearance would not admit I should judge of unusual labor.  I met George Barclay September 1896 and occasionally until his death Oct. 1898.  Where I was called to testify as to cause of death which was from a bullet fired by some unknown person while said Barclay was seated in his house at Pine River passing through his neck thereby causing instant death. 

General Affidavit of John Bubar, age 53 years  Henry Shalding, age 46 years citizens of Brainerd, 28 January 1902.

That they knew personally and were well acquainted with the soldier, George A. Barclay, for a period of 28 years commencing in the year 1867 and continuing up to the  time of his death in the year 1898; that they are acquainted with and have known personally Ammarilla Barclay, widow of George A. Barclay, soldier, for a period of 20 years commencing in the year 1882 and continuing up to the present time; that they personally know said George A. Barclay and Ammarilla Barclay were married and lived together as husband and wife; that they verily believe that said George A. Barclay and Ammarilla Barclay or either of them, was never married prior to their said marriage; that the contents of this affidavit are known to affiants by personal knowledge, observation and acquaintance for a time as aforesaid. 

Something happened and the lawyers were still trying to get a resolution in 1905 and 1906 but it doesn’t appear anything came of it.  You notice that the time frame it really stretched out which means that it was difficult to get resolution.  Every time the law was updated there would be a flood of these widows declarations. Every time Amarilla applied she would have to resubmit documentation.

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$1000 reward for information.

Gov. Glough has offered a reward of $1,000 for the apprehension of the murderer of Geo. A. Barclay who was shot through a window and killed in his hotel at Pine River on the night of Oct. 29.  Every effort has been made to detect the perpetrator of the deed, but not the slightest clue has yet been found.”

From the Brainerd Tribune, Nov. 12, 1898

This $1000 is a substantial award for 1898 in terms of dollars and would be worth $27,777.78 in today’s dollars.

I was curious about Governor Clough and found this at Wikipedia where they have a portrait of the man.  How does one get a governor to offer such a reward and why?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Marston_Clough and still another link

http://www.mnopedia.org/person/clough-david-marston-dm-1846-1924

The Minnesota Historical Society has an Inventory of his Gubernatorial Records but unfortunately the description does not include anything like offering rewards for information.  It does mention several cases that took place but not G. A. Barclay.

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George Angus Barclay is buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in Brainerd, Minnesota. There are several stones in this plot.  The very tall one to the left is George’s monument, the small one on the right is the son’s, George Alexander’s, tombstone and the one in front of the large monument is George’s Civil War stone.  The shiny flat stone in the foreground is Amarilla’s.

George's Tombstones in Evergreen

George’s Tombstones in Evergreen

Close up of George's Tombstone

Close up of George’s Tombstone

Father, George Angus Barclay, Born Aug. 18, 1844, Died Oct. 29, 1898 Aged 54 Yrs, 2 Mos & 11 Days.

A Good Man is Known by His Works. 

George's Civil War stone

George’s Civil War stone very hard to read

George and Amarilla’s first grandchild is also buried in this plot.  R.S. McDonald is listed as the father. There is no stone for this baby but it is noted in the cemetery records.

Evergreen has placed their Directory of the dead online and you can click on the ? mark and go to Find A Grave for this cemetery and there is some very interesting links at Find A Grave.  They are misspellings as well so be careful. 

http://www.brainerd.net/~evergreencem/dotd.html

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&GRid=108429087&CRid=82259&  Do a search for Urton, Barclay, Dawes and more.  It is very interesting.

George Alexander the son

George Alexander the son

Warren Huffman had kind words for my great grandfather and stated in his own words in the 1973 Pine River Journal:

The first winter was a hard one for new settlers to get started. George Barclay had the one store in Pine River and without the credit that he extended it would have been impossible to stay. George Barclay had his detractors, but he was a kind-hearted man and generous. He was a small man with a high-pitched voice. I remember him well, and we all felt a genuine sorrow and loss when he was shot by an unknown person as he sat reading in the lobby of the Barclay Hotel.” By Warren Huffman in his own words “As I remember … 1894, Pine River Journal (Newspaper), Cass County, MN. 1973.

Amarilla is also buried there and upon my first visit she did not have a tombstone. There is one there now. More on her death in future posts.

George's Tombstone and his great granddaughter

George’s Tombstone and his great-granddaughter 2001

George A. Barclay, son George Alexander and Bonnie 2001.

George A. Barclay, son George Alexander and Bonnie 2001.

This is probably where the funeral ceremony for George A. Barclay took place.  I can picture Amarilla, Grace, R.S. McDonald and Alexander gathered there by the grave. How did they bring the casket in an open wagon or in a funeral wagon?  Who else was there? Did the G.A.R. perform a military ceremony for this Civil War veteran?  So many questions…

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After the Coroner’s inquest returned their verdict of “undetermined” in the death of George Barclay the funeral was allowed to take place:

Minnesota Dept of Veteran Affairs website of Memorials

Minnesota Dept of Veteran Affairs website of Memorials at the State Capitol Complex

“The remains were brought to this city today and were met at the train by friends and Pap Thomas Post No. 30, G.A.R. under who auspices the services were conducted, the murdered man being an old soldier and member of this post.  

The funeral services were conducted at the Episcopal church, Rev. C. F Kite officiating. The remains were interred in Evergreen Cemetery. The deceased leaves a widow and one married daughter to mourn his death.”  From the Cold Blooded Murder article Nov 3, 1898. 

Another version of the funeral:

“The remains were brought to Brainerd on Thursday morning for interment and the funeral took place at 11 a.m. from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Rev. C. F. Kite conducting the services.  The members of Pap Thomas Post, G.A.R. and the Women’s Relief Corps, met the funeral cortege at the station and marched with the procession to the church and thence to the cemetery.” From Cowardly Crime article Nov. 5, 1898.

See post dated November 28, 2013 “Cold Blood Murder and Cowardly Crime – November 1898,” for the complete articles.  

Alexander, George’s brother had heard of the shooting.  So he left his home in Farmington, Dakota County, Minnesota to attend the funeral on November 3, 1898. The brothers had served in the Civil War and were G.A.R. (Grand Old Army) members so I know that he would have wanted to attend and be part of the G.A.R. processional.

Source:  Local News – A.A. Barckley started for Pine River, Dakota County Tribune.

A.A. Barckley started for Pine River Wednesday morning to attend the funeral of his brother, who was shot there Saturday.

Alexander attends George's funeral

Alexander attends George’s funeral

The newspaper combined the murder events with the funeral and didn’t prepare a separate article on the events of the funeral of George A. Barclay. Unfortunately the G.A.R. Chapter that George was a member of lost their papers in a fire in about 1910, so I was unable to obtain anymore details on the funeral of George.

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Below are some newspaper accounts of the murder of George A. Barclay.  They were published several days after the event.

img153 - Copy

November 3, 1898 – Cold Blooded Murder, George A. Barclay, A Wealthy Lumberman of Pine River, Killed by the Hand of an Unknown Assassin.”  Published in the Brainerd Journal. This is five days after the murder.  They have R.S. McDonald as R.A. McDonald.  I have broken up the very long paragraph to make it easier to read.

“Last Saturday night, while seated in the waiting room of his hotel at Pine River, Geo. A. Barclay was mysteriously murdered by some culprit who remains as yet undiscovered.  Whether the deed of a madman or an enemy no one is certain.

About 7:30 o’clock he was seated in his hotel close by a window when suddenly from the outside a shot was fired whether from rifle or revolver is not known and crashing through the window it entered and passed thru his head near the back of the neck and embedded itself in a post not far distant.

A telegram was immediately sent to General Manager Hoar, of the B.& N. M. for a special train with  medical assistance, but before this could be procured a second message was received saying that he had passed away.  

A coroner’s jury yesterday was summoned and returned as their verdict, “that George A. Barclay came to his death by a gun shot from the hands of some person unknown to this jury.”

The remains were brought to this city today and were met at the train by friends and Pap Thomas Post No. 30, G.A.R. under who auspices the services were conducted, the murdered man being an old soldier and member of this post.  

The funeral services were conducted at the Episcopal church, Rev. C. F Kite officiating. The remains were enterred in Evergreen Cemetery.  The deceased leaves a widow and one married daughter to mourn his death.  

Mr. Barclay was well know all over this section of the state and had not to any ones knowledge a single enemy.  No definite clue has yet been obtained although several suspects are being watched.  It is to be sincerely hoped that ere long the murder will be avenged and that the murderer will have that justice meted out to him which he so justly and richly deserves.”

November 5, 1898 – Cowardly Crime, Barclay Foully Murdered in Pine River, published in the Brainerd Tribune.   This one is seven days after the crime was committed. (page 8, Col. 4,)   This account gives more information about where the assailant stood and what type of gun may have been used and is nicely detailed.

Geo. Barclay Foully Murdered at Pine River, while sitting in his own house.  The Victim an Old and Well Known Resident.  The people of this city were shocked on Saturday evening last by the news that Geo. Barclay , the well known hotel keeper and trader at Pine River, had been foully murdered by some cowardly assassin while sitting in his house conversing with several acquaintances.  The first news of the tragedy came over the B. & N. M. wires and the particulars were not known until Monday.  

Mr. Barclay was shot and killed about 7:30 Saturday evening.  When the fatal shot was fired he was sitting in a chair, smoking a cigar, and talking to four or five men, about five feet away from the window in the barroom of the hotel.  The assassin fired through the glass, the ball passing through Mr. Barclay’s neck from side to side, probably cutting the carotid artery of the jugular vein, as he bled profusely, and then imbedded itself in a pine post that supported the ceiling in the middle of the room.  He lived only a few minutes.  

The bullet was dug out, taken to Walker and carefully weighed by a jeweler.  Its weight is exactly 210 grains which corresponds with either a 40-60 Winchester (an old model gun) or a Colt’s 44 caliber revolver.  

The slug, which is mushroomed and much distorted, looks more like a 40 than a 44, and careful measurement of that part of the base that remains intact gives color to this theory.  It was imbedded in the pillar to a depth of two inches.  A rifle-ball should have gone somewhat deeper, but, on the other hand, a revolver slug would hardly pierce a heavy window pane and a man’s neck and go to that depth in seasoned wood.

The shot was fired, probably from a position about 15 feet outside the window as the hole in the post is about 10 inches higher than in the pane.  

Although there were several men in the room at the time, the murderer was seen by no one so far as known.  The night was very dark and the assassin no doubt sought the cover of the woods a few rods away and made good his escape.  

There seems to be no doubt that it was a willful, premeditated murder, though there is absolutely no clue whatever to the perpetrator of the cowardly deed.  Mr. Barclay had no trouble with anyone, and so far as known had no enemies who would be capable of committing such a crime.  

Justice E. R. Sundberg, of Walker, in the absence of the coroner impaneled a jury and held an inquest which was not concluded until Wednesday morning.  A searching investigation was made, but no light was thrown upon the mysterious crime, and a verdict was returned to the effect, that deceased had come to his death by shooting at the hands of some person unknown to the jury.

The remains were brought to Brainerd on Thursday morning for interment and the funeral took place at 11 a.m. from St. Paul’s Episcopal church, Rev. C. F. Kite conducting the services.  The members of Pap Thomas Post, G.A.R. and the Women’s Relief Corps, met the funeral cortege at the station and marched with the procession to the church and thence to the cemetery.

Geo. Barclay was about fifty-four years old, and had been a resident of this section for about twenty-five years.  For many years he has kept a hotel and store, and engaged in lumbering operations at Pine River.  He was well known in Northern Minnesota, was generally well liked, and had the reputation of being honest and straight forward in his dealings with his fellow men.  He was a member of the G.A.R., having entered the service as wagoner, in Co. I, Ninth Minnesota, in August, 1862, and serving until his discharge in August, 1865.  He leaves a widow and one child, the latter being the wife of R.A. McDonald.”

The Brainerd Dispatch on 04 November 1898 printed an article on George A. Barclay’s murder.  You can find a transcript at Find A Grave, Evergreen Cemetery, Brainerd.

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