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Archive for the ‘Genealogical Research Trips’ Category

Templegrds

2006 Temple Square SLC

Last year in October 2013, I took the Sources for Tracing Pre-mid-Nineteeth Cemetery Ancestors course offered by the British Institute in Salt Lake City, Utah, which is sponsored by the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History. http://www.isbgfh.org/

The course was excellent and one of my teachers appeared on an episode this last year of “Who Do You Think You Are?”  I was very excited when I saw Paul Blake on the show.  http://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are

I started to build on my Boardman and McMurray/Jackson family lines on my mother’s side and I posted my findings on the Boardman and Brown blog I write.  I also did some searching on the Spracklins.  Spracklin is Amarilla’s maiden name.  So I studied the records for Somerset, Dorset and more in England.  I will be sharing those findings on my other blog:  Solomon Goss of Fearing Twp. in future posts. See the right panel of this blog for the links to my other family history blogs.

Family History Library 2006

Family History Library 2006

This year in 2014, I will be attending the Institute again in Salt Lake City and taking Scottish Research: The Fundamentals and Beyond, by Paul Milner.  So I am currently in the process of preparing to attend this course and getting ready for the trip to Salt Lake City.  I also plan to take advantage of the opportunity to do more of the family research at the Family History Library.  It will be a very intense week of classes and researching.  So I will be getting back to posting on this blog some time in November 2014.  There is a lot of good information coming for future posts on the Barclays.

This course hopefully will help me to learn about Scottish genealogical research, figure out a strategy to “Finding the Greats.”  Hopefully I can find John Barclay and Margaret my great great grandparents in Scotland.  These are George A. Barclay’s parents, the subject of this blog.  I want to visit the British Isles at some point within the next two years so I am getting ready.

The Line at opening to the Family History Library

The Line at opening to the Family History Library

This will be my sixth trip to Salt Lake City and the Family History Library.  https://familysearch.org/locations/saltlakecity-library  This library and their online website for their records has contributed greatly to my research successes.  https://familysearch.org/search  I do know of people who go there even more than six times.

2009 3rd Floor Family History Library

2009 3rd Floor Family History Library

At the National Genealogical Society Conference held in Salt Lake City in 2010 Family Search announced that they would digitize their whole collection and it would take 100 years but they had created ways to improve digital transfer so they could do it in 10 years.  I was amazed.  Every time I go to their website it changes and gets better and better.

2013 British Institute

2013 British Institute getting ready…

I was thinking of sharing my Powerpoint lecture:  “Planning a Trip to the Family History Library,” on this blog but I created it five years ago and it is now very out-of-date, so you can see that Family History Library and their website have changed a lot.

2013 British Institute Class

2013 British Institute Class

Well it is time to get back to planning for this trip.  One of the requirements is to read a book on Scottish History, so I best go and get my two chapters in.

The History of Scotland,” by Peter & Fiona Somerset Fry, reprinted several times 1997.

 

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I have just returned from my trip to Ontario, Quebec, parts of Michigan and New York.  Most of the trip did not add to the research of this specific blog.  However, is it possible that John Barclay came in through Canada to the United States?  I do see the Barclay name in Canada and in cemeteries.

The Whole province of Ontario

The Whole province of Ontario

So that is the reason I have not been posting on this blog for a while.  If you would like to see what my adventures were all about you can go to my two other blogs The Boardman and Browns and The Man Who Lived Airplanes.  See the right side of this blog for the links.

Southern Ontario

Southern Ontario

The majority of the trip is to dig deeper into my mother’s side of the family and visit the family history sites.  I never thought I would get very far in researching “Browns.” I have to give thanks to several cousins for their diligence.  I will spend my time in the southern part of Ontario.

The Boardmans and Browns of Winnipeg: A Canadian Story http://boardmanbrown.wordpress.com/

On my dad’s side, I am still trying to make that connection to the origins of the McD’s in Canada and Scotland. There have been recent developments that I am currently pursuing so you may see more posts about the research soon.

Southern Quebec and parts of New York

Southern Quebec and parts of New York

The Man Who Lived Airplanes: http://macdonellfamily.wordpress.com/

Come and check it out!!!

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Ellen Barclay lived another 10 years after her husband John Barclay.  She died in 1907.

In this post I want to share what I know about Ellen, because I think it fits with John Barclay’s end of life.  They had been together 29-30 years and had 4 children.  The children were Charles, William, Mary E., Anna Elizabeth.  I will go into more detail on the lives of John Barclay’s children from both marriages, when I get to the death of Alexander Barclay who was a half-brother to Ellen’s children and full brother to the first seven, Margaret’s children.  Alexander left a very involved probate file when he died in 1906.  He was George Angus Barclay’s full brother and my great grandfather and subject of this blog.

Her name has been a frustration because documents have her as Helen or Ellen.  The writing was so bad you could not read it.  The tombstone has her name as Ellen so I will use that name.  In John Barclay’s obituary notice it was said that her maiden name was Iverson but in her own obituary it is listed as Stevenson.  It is possible she was married before John, but so far I do not see any evidence for a first marriage for Ellen.  It is also possible that the use of Iverson was a mistake.  I am choosing to go with Ellen Stevenson Barclay till I am sure.

There is so much more research to do on Ellen Stevenson Barclay. I wish I had the time.  Ellen is the second wife of John Barclay and I do not descend from her.  I descend from Margaret  and frankly I am more interested in finding the origins of John Barclay and his first wife Margaret.  So I present what I have learned about Ellen for those who would be interested.

In order to understand Ellen’s life you need to review some of the posts I have written about John Barclay.  She will be featured in census and other documents like deeds, etc.  You can find other posts by using the search box on the right of this blog.  You can also seek out the Categories on the right of this blog and under SURNAMES you will find “Barclay Surnames.”   From there scroll down and you will find John Barclay and Ellen/Helen Stevenson.  Unfortunately the names are alpha order rather than by the lineage.

So what happened to Ellen after John’s death?

In 1898, after John’s death, Ellen Barclay (widow) rents her land to her son Charles Barclay on 29 August 1898

$100 yearly for years during the life of the party of the first part to be paid on April first and Jany first of each year.  The NW atr of the NE qtr of Sec 23, Twp. 115, Range 22, according to the government survey thereof.  Also said party reserves the use of two rooms in the building on the above property, use of the present garden, also parture, barn, corn and feed for one cow, poultry 

Source:  Deed of Indenture Ellen Barclay to Charles Barclay, Aug 29, 1898, Vol. 47, pg. 287 #11684, FHL# 1255725, Scott County, Minnesota

On 13 February 1899 another son William Barclay sells his share of the land to his brother Charles.

For a sum of $1800.00, Wm. and wife Clara E. Barclay are residing in Mammoth, Madison Co., Montana sold to Charles Barclay residing in Eagle Creek, Scott Co., Montana to-wit, the south 1/2 of the NE qtr of Sec. 23, Twp. 115, Range 22, 80 acres according to gov. survey.  Except a certain mortgage payable to Henry Hinds of Shakopee. Witnessed by W.R. Macfadden and F. H. Wilbour and signed by William Barclay and Clara E. Barclay in the State of Montana, County of Madison etc.

Source:  Deed of Wm. Barclay and wife Clara E. to Charles Barclay, February 13, 1899, Vol. 47, pg. 33 #12062, Scott Co., Minnesota, FHL #1255727.

After John’s death in 1897, we find that the next census is the 1900 U.S. Federal Census.  In this census we learn that Ellen was living with her son Charles.  This census shows us that the only child that is still around is Charles. The remaining three children of John and Ellen have married and migrated elsewhere.  William and Mary E. went to Montana.  Anna married and went to Wisconsin to live.  Charles is a mystery.  After his mother’s death it is difficult to determine where he went.  There are possibilities for a Charles Barclay living in Minneapolis/St. Paul.

28/28 Barcley, Charlie, Head, Jan. 1860, 40 years old, single, born in Minnesota, Father born in Scotland, mother born in Norway, farmer, educated, land info.  Barcley, Ellen, mother born Apr 1833, 67 years widow, one child born, one child living, born in Norway and both parents where born in Norway. Naturalized 1858, 45 years in country (means she immigrated in 1855), educated.  Carter, John, Nephew born Feb. 1890 10 years, single.  Born in Wisconsin, Father born in Canada Fr., mother Minnesota, at school, 8 grade, educated.

Source:  Charlie Barclay & Mother, 1900 U.S. Federal Census,  Eagle Creek, Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota, FHL#1240788, Microfilm T623, Roll 788, page 142, SD ?, ED 172, Sheet #2.  I do not understand the number of children fro Ellen in this census.  All her children lived long lives?

Something happened in 1904 because a notice in the gossip column of the Scott County Argus was featured on May 20, 1904.  I have no idea what this means?

“Eagle Creek: Charles Barclay has moved his household furniture into Shakopee, and will make that his future home.  Charlie was always kind and obliging to everyone and we will all miss his happy smile very much.”

In 1906 he is still living in Shakopee per his half-brother Alexander Barclay’s probate case. This probate will be featured indepth at a later time on this blog.

Charles Barclay, aged 45 years, residing at Shakopee, Minn., who is a half-brother.

Ellen passes on 30 November 1907 in Shakopee.  She is buried with John in the Valley Cemetery in Shakopee. You see that they use the name Helen in the obituary notice but Ellen is on the tombstone.

Helen Barclay Death Notice Shakopee Tribune Dec. 13, 1907 pg. 4 col 3 Maiden: Stevenson also in the Argus on Dec 6, 1907 pg. 1 and col 4.

Helen's 2nd Obituary Notice

Helen’s 2nd Obituary Notice

Died – Barclay – At her home in this city, Saturday, November the 30th, Mrs. Helen Barclay of heart disease. Aged 73 years. Helen Stevenson was born in Norway in 1834, and came to this country in 1849(39?) settling in Wisconsin, then Iowa, finally coming to Minnesota in 1848. She moved to Shakopee in 1850 with her husband, John Barclay, and was one of the early pioneer settlers of Shakopee. Mrs. Barclay leaves four children to mourn her loss. They are: Mrs. Mary Clark of Montana, Mrs. Anna E. Carter of Marynette, Wis.; and Charles at home, and William Barklay of Montana. The funeral was held from the residence, Tuesday, at two o’clock in the afternoon, Rev. Mr. Ganschow officiating. We extend our sincere sympathy to the bereaved children.

2nd Obit – Scott Co. Argus – Friday, Dec. 6, 1907 – Died – Mrs. Helen Barclay, whose maiden name was Stevenson, died at her home in this city, Saturday, November 30th, 1907, of heart failure. Deceased had been in poor health for several months past, but not until two days prior to death did her condition give cause for alarm. Mrs. Barclay was a native of Norway, where she was born April 25, 1834. She came to America in 1849 and has resided in Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota. Her husband, John Barclay, and she were pioneer settlers in Scott county where the family is well-known. For several years past Mrs. Barclay has made her home in Shakopee with her son Charles, who survives her together with another son, William of Montana, and two married daughters. The funeral took place, Tuesday afternoon, at two o’clock, from the family residence, Rev. Carl Ganschow officiating, and interment was in the Valley Cemetery.

Helen's obituary notice Dec 1907.

Helen’s obituary notice Dec 1907.

The above information gives us some good information on Ellen/Helen Iverson/Stevenson.  Ellen left a probate file and will.  I will present that in the next post.

Note:  I was having a great deal of trouble researching the early years of the state of Minnesota and when it was a territory and was unable to find an actual marriage for John and Ellen in the records.  Minnesota went through a lot of changes before it became a state and was associated with records of a territorial nature of Michigan and Wisconsin.  The counties also changed their boundaries.   Here is a Wikipedia article that might help to get you started on researching in Minnesota http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Minnesota

The other problem is that not a lot of documents have been filmed by the Family History Library for some of the counties of Minnesota.  So access to the documents is onsite.  I have traveled to Minnesota three times and would love to go back for more research, we will see.

Me at the Minnesota Historical Society 2007, my third time there.

Me at the Minnesota Historical Society 2007, my third time there.

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John and Ellen Barclay are both buried in Valley Cemetery in Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota.  Finding Valley Cemetery was not an easy task for I did this back in 2007.

Here is a Google map that shows where the cemetery is located:

Location of Valley Cemetery

Location of Valley Cemetery

Find A Grave has a listing of Valley Cemetery about 82% photographed, along with a map of the location.   There is a picture of the tombstone of John and Ellen taken in 2010 and it is looking a little worse for wear.  My photos were taken in 2007.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=83757&CScn=Valley+&CScntry=4&CSst=25&CScnty=1379&

When my husband and I arrived at the cemetery in June of 2007, we went to the location given in the cemetery publication I had found.  I searched and searched but did not find the tombstone.  Luckily my husband is very good at finding things in cemeteries.  He found the stone in a different location.

We first looked at lot E 1/2 lot 94.  See the white arrow on the map below.  Instead, the tombstone was in the South end section 7 Row 16 near a Sam Woods, Ronald Brown etc.  It is closer to the cemetery shed and farther from the house on the left.   See the red arrow.

Google Earth Photo of Valley Cemetery in Minnesota

Google Earth Photo of Valley Cemetery in Minnesota

Go in at the entrance sign and go straight back past the shed.

Entering Valley Cemetery in Shakopee, MN

Entering Valley Cemetery in Shakopee, MN

Here is the tombstone that I saw in June of 2007.  It had lost its finial at the top but it was not leaning like the Find A Grave photo.

John & Ellen Barclay's Stone

John & Ellen Barclay’s Stone

Here are closer views of the inscription on the tombstone.

John Barclay and Ellen Barclay, Valley Cemetery

John Barclay and Ellen Barclay, Valley Cemetery

It reads:  John Barclay born Mar 18, 1801, Died Dec 25, 1897.  Ellen Barclay born April 25, 1831, Died Nov. 30, 1907.

The next photograph is closer to Ellen’s information.  The name of John’s second wife has been a lot of trouble.  Here it is written as Ellen, but her estate file has it as Helen, sigh!  We can go with the information on the tombstone or keep an open mind about other records that use Helen.

Ellen Barclay's information

Ellen Barclay’s information

I took this picture so that one could use the houses in the background to find the tombstone quickly.

Tombstone of John and Ellen Barclay

Tombstone of John and Ellen Barclay

Here is a picture of me next to the tombstone of my 2nd great-grandfather John Barclay.  Ellen was his second wife and I descend from the first whose name was Margaret.  Little is known about Margaret unfortunately.

Bonnie at the grave of her great grandfather John Barclay, Valley Cem, MN

Bonnie at the grave of her great-grandfather John Barclay, Valley Cemetery, MN

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My family has not always been easy to trace and doesn’t show up in published works as much as I would like.  Once in a while I get lucky.  George A. Barclay appears in the article “Homes for Settlers in Northern Minnesota,” in February of 1895 of the Northwest Magazine on pages 34 and 35.

As an example of prosperous pioneer life in this region, George A. Barclay settled there in 1873, at Pine River, thirty miles north of Brainerd and in the heart of the region. He entered 6.0 (640?) acres of Government land under the old and now repealed cash-entry system, at $1.25 an acre. He had $50 left and all his other worldly goods he carried in a pack on his back. He hired a Chippewa Indian to help him build a log house the first in that region. It is still standing in good condition. The Brainerd & Northern Minnesota track runs between his old home and the log barn on the left. Mr. Barclay has now ninety acres under successful cultivation; he has a good store, doing a business, as shown by his books, of $3,000 a month, and he has just completed a new hotel and store building. His property is now worth $18,000 or $20,000.”

A portion of the article about George Barclay's Ranch

A portion of the article about George Barclay’s Ranch

Of course, this article was written to attract other settlers to the area.  I am guessing the Chippewa Indian was McNanny/Nannie.  The article included a picture of George’s Ranch.

George's Ranch 1895 NW Magazine

George’s Ranch 1895 NW Magazine

Source:  “Home for Settlers in Northern Minnesota,” Northwest Magazine, Feb. 1895, Vol. 13 #2, St. Paul, MN

Compare the above picture with this photograph of George’s Ranch in the Logsleds to Snowmobiles book.  Permission given by the town of Pine River.

This is where my grandmother Grace grew up.  Do you see a little girl with pigtails running around and possibly a dirty face?

Barclay's Ranch in Logsleds Book

Barclay’s Ranch in Logsleds Book

When I was traveling in Minnesota in 2001, my goals was to seek out museums that might show me a little of what life might have been like for my great grandparents, George and Amarilla, and their daughter Grace.   So I took out a Minnesota Historical Society membership and it gave me access to several of their historic sites such as the Harkin Store in New Ulm:  http://sites.mnhs.org/historic-sites/harkin-store  This store is a living museum set in 1870 which is close to the time frame of George’s first trading post but I lean toward his later store.

This store seemed very well stocked, with a stove in the center and some chairs.  It also had a mail center (George was postmaster for a time) and a bulletin board.  Did great grandfather’s store look like this or was it totally different?  Somehow I think that his very early store was probably a little cruder and there was the smell of liquor and cigars? He did have to bring goods from Brainerd or trade with the Indians.  When Amarilla joined him in 1878 things might have gotten a little more organized and cleaner, maybe?

Harkin Store

Harkin Store

Warm yourself by the stove

Warm yourself by the stove

I was also curious about their living quarters what would it have been like.   My travels took me to the Cross Lake Historical Society and Pioneer Village:  http://www.crosslakehistoricalsociety.org/  It was wonderful and I highly recommend it.

Cabin at Cross Lake Historical Society 2001

Cabin at Cross Lake Historical Society 2001

If you compare the two photos above of George’s ranch you see the outside of the buildings and these cabins look similar.  Below are two photos which show a little of the interior of the cabin.  In this cabin they had everything.  The kitchen, dining area, laundry area and sleeping area.  Did my great grandfather’s cabin look like this one?  With the addition of the Barclay Hotel, things might have changed a lot.

The Interior with a bed, dishes, rugs and more.

The Interior with a bed, dishes, rugs and more.

More of the interior with a stove and a wash area.

More of the interior with a stove and a wash area.

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More news about the railroad coming to Pine River appears in the Brainerd Tribune for June 9, 1894:

1. George Barclay returned from Brainerd last Friday.

2. The engineers are pretty near through with surveying the line for the new railroad, and work will soon begin. Sooner the better.

3. Last Monday a delegation of railroad magnates called on Mayor Ed Allen to ascertain if the city authorities of Pine River would grant the new railroad the right of way through our main street, where they now have their stakes drove, and after a short council it was granted. Watch our smoke.

4. F. H. Kimball the chief engineer, came up from Brainerd last night.

NOTE:  There is a notation that an F.H. Kimball was the architect for the Reading Railroad’s headhouse terminal in 1891 at Wikipedia was this the same man?

June 16, 1894 the Brainerd Tribune reports:

1. Paddy McDonald, the Duluth railroad contractor, was in Pine River last week looking over the route of the new road.

Note:  According to the Duluth Township Newsletter pg 5, July 2006:

“Paddy McDonald ran the crew that cleared the trees and brush from along the right of way. He was a well-known pugilist (Boxer) who had fought some very noted heavyweight contenders. He was also the man who was entrusted by the railroad to carry the payroll by dogsled from Duluth to Two Harbors and then Soudan before the track was completed to there. Alone and at night, he carried in excess of $16,000 in gold and silver coins contained in a heavy wooden box with lid nailed down. A formidable foe with either deadly weapons or fists, he was a man to be reckoned with. Now he ran the crews engaged in clearing the line.”

2. Mr. Grant, the Faribault railroad contractor, was here last Wednesday looking over the line of the proposed new road.

3. Last Week George Barclay located some farmers from Todd County who are hunting homesteads in Cass county. Emigration to Pine River will soon commence.

4. We will soon have the cars passing our doors now. The last line that was run passes the front of the house so near that its necessary to tear the old house down and build a new one. We’ll build a solid brick block to start the town booming. Hurrah for Pine River!

5. George Barclay returned from a cruising trip last Sunday and says the country is all on fire over toward Woman Lake. He had a narrow escape from being killed by a falling tree whilst coming home.  

Note:  I tried to find out more about this fire but online lead me to the big one that occurred in later in September of 1894.

June 24, 1894 the Brainerd Tribune has these items of interest:

1. George Barclay left last Tuesday for the twin cities and Chicago. He will be gone about two weeks.

2. Mr. Foley, who has the contract for building the new railroad , was here last Saturday.

3. When the new railroad is completed as far as Pine River,  Mayor Ed Allen will issue invitations to all city authorities between here and St. Paul.

Note:  The Minnesota Historical Society  has an excellent newspaper collection and I have visited this archive on several occasions 2000, 2001, 2007.  The Brainerd Tribune was only one newspaper that I studied.  I had prepared a spreadsheet with date events for each person/surname I was targeting.  I had studied the society’s holdings in advance so that I knew which newspapers were at what times and dates.  I was then able to pull the microfilm reels to access the newspapers quickly.  Newspaper research is hard work and takes time, so if you can prepare yourself before going to an archive it helps a great deal to save time.   It doesn’t hurt to practice at home before going on your trip.  Where do they place obituaries and funeral notices, where are important stories placed, what are the sections of the newspaper etc.  Newspapers can add little pieces of information that can make the lives of your ancestors more interesting.  Each newspaper is a little different so you need to take your time and get us to the format when you first begin.  Also the time frame of the newspaper can mean a different focus.  Most newspapers in the earlier part of the 1800’s did not really have obituaries unless you were wealthy and were more business oriented. The gossip columns or the news of different local areas did not show up till about the 1880’s.

So what do you think was George Barclay’s reason to go to the Twin Cities and Chicago for two weeks?  I would love to know why he went on this trip.  I do know that Grace, his daughter was at school in the Twin Cities at the time.  Why Chicago?

The Minnesota Historical Society & Me 2007

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The decade of the 1890’s was going to be a very eventful decade for The Barclays of Pine River!  We begin this decade with George’s father and a Civil War pension.

Sadly the 1890 U.S. Federal Census was burned in a fire in 1921.  At Ancestry.com they have what they call the 1890 U.S. Census Fragment.  All that remains of Minnesota is Wright County:  Rockford.  There are other counties in other states but all total what survives is about 1233 pages?  Ouch!

There is a 1890 Veterans Schedule at Ancestry.com that can help the situation.  This is what Ancestry says about this schedule. 

“This database is an index to individuals enumerated in the 1890 special census of Civil War Union veterans and widows of veterans available on microfilm M123 (118 rolls) from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). Although this schedule was to be used to enumerate Union veterans, in some areas, Confederate veterans were listed as well

Special Schedules of the Eleventh Census (1890) Enumerating Union Veterans and Widows of Union Veterans of the Civil War; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M123, 118 rolls); Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15; National Archives, Washington, D.C.”

George A. Barclay is not listed in this Veteran’s schedule which only covers Leech Lake and Gull River for Cass County. Gull River is listed as “Grill” at Ancestry.  His brother Alexander is not listed in this Veteran’s schedule.  He is living in The Town of Eureka, Dakota County, Minnesota and that city is not listed either. 

Fortunately Eagle Creek in Scott County is listed and we find George and Alexander’s father featured. It was because of this list I learned that John Barclay did participate as a carpenter in the Civil War for a few short months towards the end of the war.

The top part of the Veterans Schedule for John Barclay:

Top Part of the Veterans Schedule

Zeroing in on John Barclay’s Civil War Service:

John Barclay Entry

Sometime there are remarks written at the bottom about a soldier, here is some information about John Barclay.  It is very difficult to read:

Remarks Veterans Schedule

Hse 57, Family 57 John Barclay, Carpenter Dec 1865 to June 1866, 6 mos. A note down below reads: Was sworn as a carpenter at St. Louis, Mo to serve ___M (quartermaster) at ____, Mo. was discharged at extinction of term.

Source:  1890 Special Schedules of the U.S. Surviving Soldiers, Sailors and Marines, and Widows, etc.  NARA: M123, Roll 23 Minnesota Veterans of 1890, pg. 1, SD 2, ED 177, line 7. FHL#3381823 Eagle Creek, Scott Co., Minnesota, pg. 1, #5757.

This Veterans Schedule for John Barclay lead me to his Civil War pension file which I will feature in the next post.

********

The Civil War Blog post on Veterans Schedules was very interesting.  The focus is about the Civil War in Pennsylvania.  It is very interesting for the author explains how to read the schedule giving examples. There are other topics of interest as well.   

http://civilwar.gratzpa.org/2011/03/u-s-census-returns-1890-veterans-schedules/

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