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Archive for the ‘BARCLAY SURNAME’ Category

4th of July

4th of July

4th of July Celebrations

“The glorious fourth will be celebrated as it never was before at Pine River. There are to be horse races, pitching the weight and climbing the greasy pole and a match game of baseball between Pine River nine and the Big Bend nine in the afternoon. The day’s pleasure will wind up with a grand dance in the bowery kindly lent by G. A. Barclay. The Pine River Cornet band, under the leadership of Prof. Sam McConnell will be in attendance all day. The chief orator of the day will be George Barclay.

The glorious Fourth passed off at Pine River in fine shape.  It commenced at sunrise with a salute of one hundred guns.  At ten o’clock a grand street parade took place, headed by the city band under the leadership of Prof. Sam McConnell.  All the various trades of our city were well represented and the mayor and city council rode in carriages.  After parading the principal streets the procession made it s way to the city park, where all kinds of games were indulged in and a patriotic speech was delivered by the mayor.  In the evening the  day’s fun wound up by a grand bowery dance in the park.”

Source:  The Brainerd Tribune, Local News, Pine River, July 7 and 14th, 1894, from the newspaper collection at the Minnesota Historical Society.

It is too bad that George’s speech was not published in the newspaper!  It does sound like it was a wonderful celebration.

Image courtesy of Vintage Holiday Crafts - http://vintageholidaycrafts.com/

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George apparently took Amarilla and Grace with him on his trip to the East.  The Brainerd Tribune of June 30, 1894 gives these accounts in the Pine River section of the Local News.   There was a lot going on for the Barclays at this time.

The banner of the newspaper in Brainerd

The banner of the newspaper in Brainerd

1. George Barclay returned from the east last Sunday, accompanied by Mrs. and Miss Barclay, who will spend the summer vacation here and watch our city grow.

2. George Barclay while away visited Minneapolis, Chicago and New York City and says things are very dull.

3. George Barclay will commence building in a few days on the new town site.

4. Last week our neighbor correspondent said that George Barclay was as tickled as a boy with a new pair of shoes,  as the road passed through his place, etc. But George Barclay was in Chicago at the time and knew nothing of the line and when he came home last Sunday the shoes did not fit at all.  When a man has to tear down four buildings and dig a new well for thirty feet, and have his gardens torn up, I don’t think there is anything to be tickled about. Do you?

Source:   The Brainerd Tribune film 1/6-12/29/1894, article dated June 30, 1894 under Local news “Pine River.”   Below is the actual article.

Pine River News June 30, 1894

Pine River News June 30, 1894

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At the end of the month of June the Brainerd Dispatch Newspaper reported on June 29, 1894 the following series of  robberies that were taking place in the area.  Note the article on this front page about the Railroad strike?

Front page – see next photo for the entire story

Under Local News Notes the full article appears in the second column about a series of robberies in the north area:

HUNGRY MEN WILL EAT

Robbery at Barclay Ranch – 1894

From the country north of Brainerd comes reports of much suffering and destatuion among hundreds of men who have been enduced to come to this region by the beginning of operations on the Brainerd & Northern Minnesota railroad extension, and who have not found employment as expected.  During the past few days many depredations have been committed by men who claim they cannot starve. 

At Geo. Barclay’s place on Saturday night his warehouse was broken into and some $65 worth of eatables, such as flour, hams, potatoes, and a quantity of tobacco were stolen.  The same day a tote team loaded with provisions and belonging to Beckus & Co. was stopped on the road above Gull Lake and all the article that could be made into food was transferred from the owner’s wagon to a wagon belonging to the men and they told the driver that it was a matter of life or death with them as they had nothing to eat for several days but boiled fish without even salt to flavor it with.  There were 25 men in this gang and they stated that an account would be kept of the amount taken and that if they ever got money enough they would pay for it.  On Monday night about 10 o’clock Geo. Jenkins was stopped near Long Lake on the Leech Lake road by three men who sprung out of the brush and siezed his horses by the heads while the third man looked his wagon over, and seeing nothing in it that they could eat he told his companions to let Mr. Jenkins proceed as he had nothing they wanted.  Articles have also been taken from teams belonging to Nelson, Tenny & Co., H.B. Frey and A. Leonard.

It is to be regretted that so many men are being sent to this section for work on the new road when there are twice as many men on the ground as can find employment.  We are informed that advertisements are posted in St. Paul and Minneapolis stating that men are wanted here for this work, and it is undoubtedly for the sole purpose of getting the unemployed out of those two cities and dumping them into a country where there is nothing to do with no chance of getting enough to eat even.  The men are willing to work and say they will not starve as long as there are provisions in the country that they can get, even if they have to resort to force to obtain them.”

“Hungry Men will Eat,” Brainerd Dispatch, Brainerd, Minnesota, Friday June 29, 1894 under Local News, 2nd column.

In 1893 there was a major economic panic.  If you just Google “Panic of 1893″ you will get many hits on the subject.   Here is a link to an article about this panic: http://eh.net/encyclopedia/article/whitten.panic.1893

So there were many contributing events going on that were causing a lot of problems for many people so this article is not too surprising.  Apparently George Angus Barclay was doing well in spite of the economic troubles for he was about to build the Barclay Hotel.

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More news about the railroad coming to Pine River appears in the Brainerd Tribune for June 9, 1894:

1. George Barclay returned from Brainerd last Friday.

2. The engineers are pretty near through with surveying the line for the new railroad, and work will soon begin. Sooner the better.

3. Last Monday a delegation of railroad magnates called on Mayor Ed Allen to ascertain if the city authorities of Pine River would grant the new railroad the right of way through our main street, where they now have their stakes drove, and after a short council it was granted. Watch our smoke.

4. F. H. Kimball the chief engineer, came up from Brainerd last night.

NOTE:  There is a notation that an F.H. Kimball was the architect for the Reading Railroad’s headhouse terminal in 1891 at Wikipedia was this the same man?

June 16, 1894 the Brainerd Tribune reports:

1. Paddy McDonald, the Duluth railroad contractor, was in Pine River last week looking over the route of the new road.

Note:  According to the Duluth Township Newsletter pg 5, July 2006:

“Paddy McDonald ran the crew that cleared the trees and brush from along the right of way. He was a well-known pugilist (Boxer) who had fought some very noted heavyweight contenders. He was also the man who was entrusted by the railroad to carry the payroll by dogsled from Duluth to Two Harbors and then Soudan before the track was completed to there. Alone and at night, he carried in excess of $16,000 in gold and silver coins contained in a heavy wooden box with lid nailed down. A formidable foe with either deadly weapons or fists, he was a man to be reckoned with. Now he ran the crews engaged in clearing the line.”

2. Mr. Grant, the Faribault railroad contractor, was here last Wednesday looking over the line of the proposed new road.

3. Last Week George Barclay located some farmers from Todd County who are hunting homesteads in Cass county. Emigration to Pine River will soon commence.

4. We will soon have the cars passing our doors now. The last line that was run passes the front of the house so near that its necessary to tear the old house down and build a new one. We’ll build a solid brick block to start the town booming. Hurrah for Pine River!

5. George Barclay returned from a cruising trip last Sunday and says the country is all on fire over toward Woman Lake. He had a narrow escape from being killed by a falling tree whilst coming home.  

Note:  I tried to find out more about this fire but online lead me to the big one that occurred in later in September of 1894.

June 24, 1894 the Brainerd Tribune has these items of interest:

1. George Barclay left last Tuesday for the twin cities and Chicago. He will be gone about two weeks.

2. Mr. Foley, who has the contract for building the new railroad , was here last Saturday.

3. When the new railroad is completed as far as Pine River,  Mayor Ed Allen will issue invitations to all city authorities between here and St. Paul.

Note:  The Minnesota Historical Society  has an excellent newspaper collection and I have visited this archive on several occasions 2000, 2001, 2007.  The Brainerd Tribune was only one newspaper that I studied.  I had prepared a spreadsheet with date events for each person/surname I was targeting.  I had studied the society’s holdings in advance so that I knew which newspapers were at what times and dates.  I was then able to pull the microfilm reels to access the newspapers quickly.  Newspaper research is hard work and takes time, so if you can prepare yourself before going to an archive it helps a great deal to save time.   It doesn’t hurt to practice at home before going on your trip.  Where do they place obituaries and funeral notices, where are important stories placed, what are the sections of the newspaper etc.  Newspapers can add little pieces of information that can make the lives of your ancestors more interesting.  Each newspaper is a little different so you need to take your time and get us to the format when you first begin.  Also the time frame of the newspaper can mean a different focus.  Most newspapers in the earlier part of the 1800′s did not really have obituaries unless you were wealthy and were more business oriented. The gossip columns or the news of different local areas did not show up till about the 1880′s.

So what do you think was George Barclay’s reason to go to the Twin Cities and Chicago for two weeks?  I would love to know why he went on this trip.  I do know that Grace, his daughter was at school in the Twin Cities at the time.  Why Chicago?

The Minnesota Historical Society & Me 2007

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The year of 1894 was a very busy year for the Barclays of Pine River, Minnesota.  The following news was reported in the Brainerd Tribune June 2, 1894:

G.A.R. Badge

1) “Mr. & Mrs. Barclay came up from Brainerd last Sunday, returning Tuesday for Decoration Day.

Note:  Decoration Day is now known as Memorial Day http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Army_of_the_Republic

2) George Barclay went to Brainerd to-day to attend the G.A.R. ceremonies on Decoration day, he being master of transportation.

Note:  George was a member of the G.A.R. Pap Thomas Post No. 30 in Brainerd.  Unfortunately their records were lost in a fire in 1910.  There are some records at the Minnesota Historical Society but they are from 1914 to 1920 and that is too late for my needs.

3) The mayor and council will visit Brainerd as soon as the palace sleeping cars are running on our new railroad.

This link will take you to an interesting article with pictures and diagrams of what a palace car was like.

ttp://www.midcontinent.org/rollingstock/builders/pullman1.htm

4) H.B. Frey came up from Minneapolis last Tuesday, looking after the engineers of the new railroad.

Mr. Frey seemed to be in the business of buying land for he appears in the land records for the St. Cloud office in Minnesota on a great many occasions.

5) Last Monday night about eleven o’clock some persons attempted to go through George Jenkins’ warehouse and got left. The thieves, whoever they were, were not on to their job. They carried a light and made too much noise. They were surprised by one of the hired men who happened to hear them after he was in bed. He got up and loaded his Winchester and ordered them to halt, but not complying with his request he fired and the next morning he found flour, beans and pork, also a piece of a shirt all covered with blood. It’s a pity he did not find the man as George Barclay has suffered likewise. The parties are known and had better be more careful. We don’t want any of the Coxey army up here.”  

I didn’t know anything about what or who the Coxey army was so I found this Wikipedia article that explained a lot.  Just do a Google search and you will get many hits on this subject: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coxey’s_Army  It had something to do with the 1893 Panic which sort of reminds me of the financial crash a few years back, something about banks failing:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panic_of_1893

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Amarilla’s older brother was killed in a terrible accident on June 22, 1893.  I do not know how she took the news or whether she went to the funeral.  Henry had stayed behind in Iowa, while Amarilla had headed north to Minnesota.  He had left Iowa County by 1875 and was married by then (see below for information about the marriage).  Amarilla was in Minnesota and married by 1878.  So they were not close in location. 

Henry Franklin Spracklin was a full brother to Amarilla.  He was the oldest son and child of the first family of his father Daniel D. Spracklin and Elizabeth Keller.  Oliver and Mary had died young.  Amarilla and Henry were all that was left of this first family. 

In my post dated November 3, 2011 - Spracklin & Keller Connection, Amarilla’s Parents.  I outlined the four children that Daniel had with Elizabeth Keller before her death in 1859.

Daniel D. and Sarah Spracklin, the 2nd wife, were still living at the time of Henry’s death in Iowa County, Iowa. Let’s review the census both Federal and state to get a feel for what was happening in this family leading up to the death of Henry.

State census for Iowa at Ancestry are:  1856, 1885, 1895, 1905, 1915, 1925.   Any census taken before 1856 was specific to certain counties so you would need to study the list that Ancestry provides to get back further than 1856.  Their database covers 1836 to 1925. The Spracklin name is not easy to find in these census so you will need to use a variety of spellings and names in your search. 

I spent several days in the building below research the Spracklins and mostly Henry.  There are two offices for the State Historical Society one in Des Moines (main) and the other in Iowa City, Iowa. 

State Historical Society of Iowa – Iowa City

U.S. Federal Census 1880 – D.D. Spracklin Household, Dayton Twp., Iowa Co., Iowa, page 7, ED #211 #267 line 41.

Location: #69/63, Spracklin, Daniel (David), white, male, married, 50 years old, farmer, born in Ohio, father was born in England. and mother was born in Ohio. Spracklin, Sarah, white, female, 40 yrs, wife, keeping house, born in Indiana, father born in Virginia, mother born in Ohio. Spracklin, Lydia, white, female, 15 yrs., daughter, at school, born in Iowa. Spracklin Virdia, white, male, age 13, son, at school, born in Iowa. Spracklin Reed A., white, male, age 11, son, at school, born in Iowa. Spracklin, Daniel, white, male, age 10, son, at school, born in Iowa. Spracklin, George, white, male, age 7, son, born in Iowa. Spracklin, Charles, white, male, age 6, son, born in Iowa. Spracklin, Alfred, white, male, age 3, born in Iowa.

Note:  This census is probably the only on that features all of the 2nd family of Daniel D. Spracklin. 

Henry is not listed here and neither is Amarilla.  We do not find Henry till the 1885 Iowa Census.  He is not listed in the 1880 as far as I can determine and believe me I have tried.

Source:  Iowa State Census 1885,  The Henry Spracklin Family, Muscatine, Muscatine, Iowa, Line 2, Roll IA 1885_239.

85, 72, Spracklin Henry, walnut at between 4 & 5th st., age 32, male, married, laborer, Ohio. Spracklin, Elisabeth, age 31, female, married, keeping house, PA. Spracklin Harry, age 7, male, Keokuk. Spracklin Maggie, age 6 female, Scott. Spracklin Eddie, age 5, male, Scott. Spracklin, Flora, age 3, female, Scott, Spracklin, John, age 2, male, Scott. Spracklin, Wilbur, 0, male, Scott.

Daniel is living in Iowa County with the family in 1885 – D.D. Spracklin Family, Dayton Twp., Iowa Co., Iowa Film #1021479, Iowa Co. Genealogical Society. 

 House #127, Family 127, Daniel D. Spracklin, Twp 78, Range 12, Section 19, Residing in Dayton Twp., 41 yrs. old, male, married, farmer, born in Ohio. Sarah Spracklin, residing in Dayton Twp., 40 yrs. old, female, married, housewife, born in Indiana. Read A. Spracklin, 16 yrs. old, male, born in Iowa. Dalia Spracklin, 14 yrs. old, male, born in Iowa. Peter G. Spracklin, 12 yrs. old, male, born in Iowa. Charles E. Spracklin  10 yrs. old, male, born in Iowa. Alfred M. Spracklin, 8 yrs.? old, male, born in Iowa. All residing in Dayton Twp. same range and section.

Note:  Some interesting spellings to note in this census:  Reed is spelled “Read,”  Dalia is probably Daniel.  Reed has been difficult to find in the census so use different spellings when searching for him and maybe one of his children. 

Unfortunately the 1890 US Federal census was mostly destroyed by fire in 1922 and nothing survived for Iowa.  So we cannot take a good look at Henry’s family and Daniel’s to compare for the year of 1890. 

By 1893 Henry had moved and was working at the Weyerhaueser-Denkmann mill in Davenport, Scott Co., Iowa when a log slammed back on him.  The following article describes the accident and events. 

Source: The Davenport Democrat & Leader, Friday Evening June 23, 1893 front page column 1, Davenport, IA, State Historical Society of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

“A Workman Meets His Death In a Mill”

About the middle of the afternoon as H.F. Spracklin, a workman in the Weyerhauser-Denkmann mill, was shoving a plank into an edging machine, the plank became involved in the machinery in some manner so that it was hurled back, striking Spracklin in the breast and shattering his left arm. The man fell like a log, and although his fellow workmen ran to his assistance it was evident that nothing could be done to alleviate his sufferings. Physicians were telephoned for and it was deemed advisable to remove the injured man to Mercy hospital. This was attempted, in the city ambulance, but the injured man died en route, when the wagon was in the neighborhood of Fourteenth and Gaines streets. Mr. Spracklin lived a short distance north of the Orphans’ home. He leaves a wife and nine children, the eldest about 16 years of age, whom he supported by his labors. While it is not known that the family is threatened with destitution now that their paternal support is removed, it is plain that the death of the husband will bear heavily upon them.”

Henry had married Elizabeth Downey on 16 November 1875 in Keokuk Co., Iowa.  Elizabeth was born about 1854 in Cambria Co., PA.  Her parents were John Downey (1822 to 1912) and Margaret McGavery (1826 to 1872).  Elizabeth’s grandparents were Dennis Downey (b. 1798, Ireland) and Elizabeth Crilley (b. 1790 died 19 Aug 1880 in Loretta, Cambria Co., PA.  She is buried in the St. Michael’s Cemetery. 

Finding out what happened to Elizabeth after Henry’s death is a very interesting story which I will share in a future post. 

Source:  Keokuk County, Iowa, Marriages 187-1880, #1313, Nov. 16, 1875, pg. 49, State Historical Society, Iowa City, IA.

There was some confusion on the number of children Elizabeth and Henry had together.  One researcher had combined Henry’s kids with the his first son Harry who had 10 children.  The account above listed 9 children.  With a great deal of work on my part and on my cousin’s who is a great-grandson of Henry, we have been able to identify and get a better understanding of just how many children Elizabeth and Henry had.  I will discuss Henry’s and Elizabeth’s children in the next post.

I would like to thank my cousin Jerry Spracklin, who supplied some if not all of the research on this family.  I met Jerry and his family back in 2003 when I went to Iowa to do research.  If you wish to know more about this family of Henry and Elizabeth please contact me and I would be happy to connect you with Jerry.

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According to several newspaper accounts, George Angus Barclay was accused of selling liquor in violation of state law. Here is one article that makes this accusation.

The article appeared in the Brainerd Dispatch on July 17, 1891 (Vol. 10, #35) on the front page about a murder near George’s Ranch.  The article spans two columns and goes the length of the front page.  Here is a small portion of it.

Murder near Barclay Ranch 1891

Stabbed in the Stomach, Pat Ryan is Murdered near

George Barclay’s Ranch with a Butcher Knife

Squaw-Man, White Men and Red Men All take a Hand in The Fiendish Bloody Tragedy.

 The unlawful selling of Liquor at the Bottom of the Murderous Mess.

“Patrick Ryan was murdered at Barclay’s lumber ranch on Saturday morning last by being stabbed in the stomach three times with a butcher knife, and his body lay bleeding in the hot rays of the sun until the authorities arrived from Brainerd on Sunday. 

On Saturday afternoon a Frenchman names Philip Provo, came to this city and notified Coroner Bain that the murder had been committed, who immediately procured assistance in the person of J. McNaughton, and started for the scene, which is 89 miles from Brainerd, in the vicinity of White Fish Lake and Pine River.  They arrived there the next morning and found a sickening sight.  Ryan’s body lay some 300 yards from Barclay’s ranch at the Indian camps in a pool of clotted blood.  The butcher knife which did the bloody work lay beside the man’s inanimate form which was cut and slashed in many pieces.  In his stomach were three cuts, any one of which would have caused death.  The back of both hands were cut and also his arms, and on the back of his head was a bruise as if made with a gun, and the supposition of many is that he was knocked down and then finished with the knife.  Coroner Bain called a jury together and during that day and the next they labored studiously to get at the facts in the case, swearing witnesses, taking testimony, and going over the ground.  The result of their deliberations was that Patrick Ryan met his death at the hands of Fred Ellis, a squaw-man, Wabash-can-we-gut, or White Cloud, a Leech Lake Indian, Waugh-bugh-chek, a White Oak Point Indian, and Cang-gee-geeluc, chief of the Cass Lake tribe. 

Just as the jury had reached this decision Sheriff Spalding arrived, he not having been notified until Sunday of the occurrence, and then only by rumor.  The parties charged with the murder were all there and he put them under arrest and started for Brainerd that night, going as far as Jenkins.’  Here the party put up for the night, at being late and very dark.  In the middle of the night Cang-gee-geeluc complained of being very ill, and his hand-cuffs were loosened, and as he seemed to get worse Coroner Bain gave him an emetic, the red man almost throwing up his moccasins–in the absence of boots.  In a short time he began rubbing his stomach and moaning again, and said he was “heep sick,” so the dose was again given him with a similar result, and as he had emptied the pail the first time he did so the second time, but as he stepped to the door he gave a jump into the darkness and was gone.  The Indian had played a very sharp trick.  It was useless to follow him, and the party came on to Brainerd the next morning and landed the three prisoners in the county jail.  They were brought up before the court for hearing on Wednesday, but Ellis said there were some witnesses he desired at Barclay’s, in the persons of two squaws who he claims saw the whole transaction, the hearing was postponed until Monday at 10 o’clock.

As near as can be ascertained from the parties who went up from Brainerd and the testimony given at the coroner’s inquest, the murder was the outcome of a drunken brawl, which was participated in by white man and Indians, and to judge from the scarred countenances of the witnesses and prisoners it must have been a terrible encounter.  It seems that at Barclay’s whisky and beer is sold as freely as in any saloon in Brainerd, and has been for some length of time in violation of the state law, and on this particular day “the boys” were having a high old-time.  Fred Ellis, who lives with a squaw at that place, came to Barclay’s in the evening, after having had a fight with his dusky wife, in which the red men at the wigwams interfered and gave him the worst of it.  He obtained some court-plaster, washed his wounds, and in company with Patrick Ryan stepped up to the bar and drank for thirty minutes, according to his sworn statement.  Ryan volunteered to go with him and “fix the Indians plenty,” and they started.  Ryan never came back alive, and his body was found next morning with a butcher knife lying beside it which belonged to Ellis, who accounts for it by saying that in the fight in the fore part of the evening the Indians took his knife and revolver.  Ellis says an Indian chased him and he ran leaving Ryan at the camp, and he finally came back and went to bed with the other fellows, and that in the morning Billy Burnet came and told them Ryan had been killed.  The case is a complicated one  The Indian who escaped was covered with blood and said he got it by holding Ryan in his arms when he died, he, and the Indians had been attracted to the spot by groans, and upon arriving found the man in a dying condition.  It is more than probable that the Indian will be recaptured and every effort is being made in that direction.  No one is to blame for losing him ____ the cunning known to people of his tribe was brought into play.  Philip Provo was arrested on Tuesday and is being held, but from what we can learn the evidence is not very strong against him.  Ryan’s body was brought to the city on Monday night and buried in Evergreen Cemetery.  A gentlemen who lives at Faribault, telegraphed to have it sent to him, then after they had prepared it for shipment he telegraphed back that they had found their son in Denver, alive and well, and that the murdered man was no relation of theirs.  The following is the testimony of the important witnesses at the coroner’s inquest…”

The article continues with more testimony from Charles Ashland, Ellis’ Statement, Mamie Vagwin, Philip Provo, and White Cloud which doesn’t really tell much but actually gets more confusing. 

I tried to locate this Coroner file but did not find one in the Crow Wing records which go back to 1887.  It might be in another location?  Cass County records start in 1898 at the Minnesota Historical Society in St. Paul on one of my trips.  I have not check state law at the time. 

Articles like this give an idea of what life might have been like for George, Amarilla and my grandmother Grace in Pine River.

 

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George Angus Barclay was discharged with honor at the end of the Civil War on August 24, 1865. 

About October 19, 1891 he filed his first set of claim papers.  This would be a long process for George and Amarilla. 

Most Civil War pension files are housed with the National Archives in Washington D.C.  There is a sizeable fee attached to obtaining one.  I was lucky.  I sought George’s pension before the rate hike took place.  I filled out all the paperwork that NARA requires and mailed it.  My papers came back to me with a note that the pension was with the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs.  So I wrote to the Veteran Affairs in June of 2001 and they sent me the file which was a good 2 inches thick.  I offered to pay for the copies, but they didn’t seem interested. 

Lisa Peterson, my colleague at APG, has written an article and posted it on her blog.  It gives an explanation of how to obtain a Civil War pension from the VA, but be advised that you might have to be a direct descendant so check with them first: 

http://www.kinquest.com/usgenealogy/va.php 

George started the process in 1891.  It was to be a long and difficult one, spanning 49 years.  If seems that every time the laws were changed regarding the Civil War pensions, Amarilla would try again and fail.  I was told it was not always fair who received the pension and who did not?

This Civil War pension was a gold mine of information about my great grandparents.  Each time they submitted they had to resubmit their vital information.  So I have several copies of their marriage license and more. 

Summary of George’s Civil War Pension: 1891 to 1895:

1. Veteran Identification Data page:  This is a summary sheet of the file for the Veterans Affairs office and includes File No., location and more.           

2.  Application of Discharged Soldier for Additional Bounty, 18th day of June 1867 for $100.00 – At Eagle Creek, Scott Co., Minnesota.  The 3rd page was a Power of Attorney.

Application of Discharged Soldier

 

Page two of the Application of Discharged Soldier

3.  Soldier’s Application – Declaration of Invalid Pension “ Act of June 27, 1890, Minnesota, County of Crow Wing, 19th day of October 1891, George Barclay aged 48 years resident of Pine River, Crow Wing Co, Minnesota declares he is the identical person who enrolled on the 15th of August 1862, Co. I, 9th Reg., Minn. Infantry, as Wagoner.  Who was honorably discharged at Ft. Snelling, MN on the 24th of August 1865.  He is unable to earn a support by reason of weakness of both legs near the knees.  He has not applied for pension and never appeared before.  Attest:  [S.G.] Alderman and [A.S.] Trommald.  Appeared before Jno. F. Fraker residing at Brainerd, Minn. and Louis Fache, Brainerd, Minnesota, known for 7 years and 10 years respectively signed by both. Sworn this 19th day of October, 1891 and signed by [S.F. Alderman] Clerk Dist. Court, Crown Wing, Minn.

4. Circular Call NO. 7 – Department of the Interior Bureau of Pensions 23 November 1891. I believe it is a direction to George to report to a Green B. Raum, Commissioner.

5. Military Service Name of Soldier George A. Barclay Enlistment information 25 November 1891.

6. Memorandum, Pension Affidavit of George Barclay, 6 January 1892.  Showing that George was represented by a Henry Phillips, Attorney at Law and Solicitor. Two copies.

7. Surgeon’s Certificate February 2, 1892. The medical examination that is done by a board of physicians that report the claimant’s condition. John Knight, Pres., E.C. [Furan] Sec’y., W. N. Morel, Treas. Following disability incurred in service:  weakness of both legs near the knee.  

8.  Memorandum dated 6 February 1892.  George explains his military service.

“State of Minnesota, Crow Wing…In the matter of Geo. Barclay for Pension. Personally came before me a Clerk of the District Court. “I have not been in the military or naval service of the United States since August 24, 1865.  That I served as Wagoner in Company “I” 9th Minn Vol. Inft. For the period of 3 years and 9 days and was never in any company.”  No signature

9.  Pension Affidavit of George Barclay, September 5, 1892 in George’s own words his health condition.

“Said soldier:  George Barclay dully sworn declares…as follows: That I incurred disease of the kidneys and injury to legs prior to Oct. 26, 1891; that said disabilities are not due to vicious habits and are to the best of my knowledge and belief permanent.  Dates when contracted are as nearly as possible as follows:  About September 1890, I was making hay on the river and had to enter the water and got my feet wet nearly every day my kidneys became much affected.  In May of 1865 at Marian, Alabama, I was riding a mule and he fell over and I went into a ditch and he fell across my legs.” (Transcribe as best as possible.)

10.  July 17, 1893 – Law Offices of Henry D. Phillips for George Barclay:  Written on this card it reads:  “Please speed action.”

11. Surgeon’s Certificate May 23, 1894, George is once again examined.  This time by John Knight, Pres., J. M. [Glinnor] Sec’y., L. M. [Bobcout] Treas. Disability incurred in the service:  Injury of legs & disease of the kidneys.

12.  Invalid Pension for George Barclay – Submitted for rejection 28 November, 1894. “No disability from causes alleged shown in a degree ratable under the Act of June 24, 1890.

13. December 11, 1894, From the Law Offices of Henry D. Phillips for George Barclay it reads:  “Please send status.” 

As you can see it was a cumbersome process and I found it very difficult to figure out exactly what each piece of paper meant.  When I received the pension it was not in any date order and of course they copied and put the cover page behind so it made it hard to figure out what piece of paper belonged to another. 

Based on what I have summarized here it looks like this is the first attempt of George A. Barclay to obtain his Civil War Pension. George will try again before his death in 1898.  I will share more about this pension file in a later post. 

It is interesting he was examined twice and they started with the weakness in the legs to later change it to injury of the legs and kidney disease.  George was 49 years old at this time.  Remember he was not a large man.  According to the Surgeon’s Certificate  he was 125 lbs. and 5 ft. 4 inches tall at this time.

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My great-grandfather George did apply for his Civil War pension.  I will be writing about that in future posts but at this time I am taking a break from this blog to focus on other lines of my family. 

Ontario and Quebec

Ronald S. McDonald married Grace Barclay, the daughter of George and Amarilla.  These two individuals are my grandparents. I have not posted about this marriage on this blog for I am trying to be chronological about George and Amarilla’s lives and events.   Ronald and Grace married in 1898 in Wisconsin, in secret!

I did share about my grandparents in another blog about my dad’s McDonald side where I will share about my trip:   

The Man Who Lived Airplanes: http://macdonellfamily.wordpress.com/

Ronald’s family came from Quebec and probably originally settled in Ontario.  I have long wanted to visit Ontario and Quebec and will be doing so soon. 

The other blog involved is the blog about my mother’s family and I will share other parts of the trips on that blog: 

 Boardmans and Browns of Winnipeg blog: http://boardmanbrown.wordpress.com/

Don’t worry, I will let you know what is happening as I travel along.  The Man Who Lived Airplanes will be the main focus of the trip to Ontario and Quebec.  The Boardman and Browns will cover the visit to Hastings County and British Columbia.  I am trying to keep the research specific to the theme of the blog. 

Come and join me!

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There are actually “Barkley’s” and Kellers Canada.  I wonder?

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Alexander Barclay, George’s brother, was awarded his civil war pension on the 20th of December 1890.  Alexander was living in Eureka Township, Dakota County, Minnesota at that time.

I sent for Alexander’s Civil War Pension file 18 April 2001 and it came 22 May 2001.  I filled out the National Archives Order for Copies of Federal Pensionor Bounty Land Warrant Applications which means I did very well and it came within a month.

NARA (The National Archives)  has an online order system now and it  works pretty well.   The other option is to hire a professional genealogist and have them go and obtain the documents for you.   There is a National Capital Area Chapter of APG  It is actually better to consider this option because they know what they are doing and will make sure you get all the correct documents.   The cost of ordering a Civil War pension went up a few years back and it is expensive to pay the fee.  I can recommend someone if you need help.  Just leave a comment. 

Alexander Barclay’s Civil War Pension contained the following documents:

1.  Soldier’s Certificate – Priv and Copr. Co. Ch. 4 Minn Vol. Inf. #14078, #31

The Cover Jacket to Alex’s Civil War Pension

2.  August 19th, 1890 – Invalid Pension – State of Minnesota, County of Dakota, 19th of August, appeared before a notary public Alexandria Barclay, 46 years, resident of Farminton, county of Dakota, State of Minnesota, …duly sworn and according to law is the Alexandria Barclay who enrolled on 1 January 1864 as Corp. in Co. C, 4 Reg. Minn Inf. Vol. and was honorably discharged at Louisville, Ky, on the 19th day of July, 1865…That he is unable to earn a support by reason of Rheumatism…That he has not yet applied for pension under application not yet given.  PO is Farmington, county of Dakota, Minnesota, Claimant’s signature – A.A. Barclay, Attest L.T. Fluke and G.S. Cable.  Also personally appeared L.F. Fluke residing in Farmington and G.S. Cable residing in Farmington.  …saw Alexandria Barclay the claimant sign…acquaintenance for 18 years – signed L.P. Fluke and G.S. Cable, Sworn to ….19th August 1890.  Leonard Aldrich notary public, Dakota County, Minn.   #38701 Soldier’s Application – Alex Barclay – filed by Travis and Brown.  Date of Execution Aug. 19, 1890.

3.  August 23, 1890 – Invalid Pension – Claimant Alexander Barclay, Farmington, Dakota County, Minnesota, Rank Priv and Corp. Co. C, Regiment 4, Minn Vol. Inf. Rate $12.00 commencing Aug. 23, 1890.  Disability Rheumatism and disease of heart and rectum.

4.  August 28, 1890 – Card – J.E. [Hust] Ex’r No. 944426, Alexandria A. Barclay P.O. Farmington, Dakota Co., Minn, C 4 Minn. Inf. Enlisted:  January 1, 1864, Discharged July 19, 1865, Application filed Aug. 23, 1890.  No other claims, Num. No. 380901, Attorney Travis & Brown, Crawfordville, Ind.

5.  December 16, 1890 – Soldier’s Application filed by John H. Mullen Adjutant General of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minn.  Declaration for Invalid Pension – State of Minnesota, County of Dakota, 16 December…appeared before a Notary Public…the aforesaid Alexander A. Barclay who was enrolled on the Twenty fifth day of September A.D. 1861 in Co. C of the 4th Regiment Minn. Vol. Infy. …was honorably discharged at Louisville, KY. on the 19th of July 1865…and he is now unable to earn a support by reason of Rheumatism.  PO address is Farmington, County of Dakota, State of Minnesota.  Signed by A.A. Barclay and witnesses are H. H. Williamson and C.G. Thyle.   H.H. Williamson resident of South St. Paul and C.G. Thyle residing at Farmington. …say they were present and saw Alexander A. Barclay the claimant sign…acquaintance with him for 20 years and 4 years respectively.  Signed by H.H. Williamson and C.G. Thyle.  Sworn..16th December 1890.  Leonard Aldrich Nortary Public. 

6.  February 5, 1891 – Delaration for Invalid Army Pension – Minnesota, County of Dakota.  On this 5th day of February 1891 personally appeared before me a notary public, Alexander Barclay, aged 47 years, resident of Farmington, County of Dakota, State of Minnesota….declares he is the identical Alexander Barclay who enlisted in the service of the United States at Ft. Snelling, County of Hennepin, State of Minnesota on the 25th day of October 1861 as a Corporal in Company C of the 4th Regiment of Minnesota Infantry Vols and was honorably discharged at Louisville, State of Kentucky on the 19th day of July 1865. 

That his personal description is as follows:  Age 47 years, height 5 feet 3.5 inches, complexion light, hair light,  eyes hazel…in the service…near a place in the State of North Carolina in the Fall of 1864 While on Sherman’s March to the Sea he contracted the disease of Rheumatism which was caused by the long march and the severe explosure.  Ever since to the present he has been afflicted with said malady, and he based this claim for pension upon Rheumatism. 

Since leaving the service he has resided in Minnesota…his occupation has been that of a Laborer…That he is now So disabled from obtaining his subsistence by manual labor by reason of his injuries…

He hereby appoints with full power …Travis and Brown of Crawfordsville, Indiana his ture and lawful attorney to prosecute his claim.  That he has not received nor applied for pension….Signed by Alexander Barclay.  Witnesses W. A. Gray and J.M. D. Craft…have known him for 15 years and his occupation has been that of a laborer.  Signed by Leonard Aldrich, Notary Public, Dakota County, Minnestoa. #944426 – Invalid Pension Original Claim of Alexander Barclay, of Capt. Rufus P. Wells, Company C, Reg’t 4, Minnesota Infty Enlisted October 25, 1861, discharged July 19, 1865. 

7.  Feb 9, 1891 – Card #944426, Alexander Barclay, Farmington, Minn, Service: Corp C, 4, Minnes. Inf., Enlisted:  October 25, 1861, Discharged: July 19, 1865.  Application filed:  Feb. 9, 1891, Attorney Travis & Brown, Crawfordsville, Ind.   Another card with not much on it.

8.  June 13, 1891 – Dept. of the Interior:  West Div., GEB Ex’r No. 944428, Washington D.C. June 13, 1891, It is alleged that Alexander Barclay enlisted Oct. 25, 1861 and served as Corporal in Co. C, 4 Reg’t Minn. Inf. and was discharged at Louisville, KY, July 19, 1865.  It is also alleged that while on duty during Sherman’s march to sea on or about Fall of 1864 he was disabled by Rheumatism.  Signed by [G...B. Raum] Commissioner.

9.  Jun 16, 1891 – #944426 War Department Record and Pension Division, Alexander Barkley, Co. C, Reg’t 4 Minn Inft. enrolled Sept 25, 1861 and d.c. July 19, 1865, From Aug. 31, 1864 to Feby 28, 1865 he held the rank of Corporal.  Other research furnish nothing additional bearing upon this case.  No medical records found.  H. Ainsworth, Captain and Ass’t. Suregon, U.S. Army.

10.  July 15, 1891 – Surgeon’s Certificate in the case of Alexander Barclay, Co. C, 4 Reg’t, Minn, Inf. Applicant for Original #944426.  Date of Examination July 15, 1891.  Signed by Board – H.O. Smith M.D. Pres., G.R. Moloney M.D., Sec’y, J.P. Caldwell M.D., Treas. P.O. Shakopee, County of Scott, State of Minn. 

Original Pension Claim No. 944426, Alexander Barclay, Rank Pvt & Corp. Company C, 4 Reg’t, Minn, Inf. shakopee, Minn. Claimant P.O. Farmington, Minn. July 15, 1891.  Cause of disability Rheumatism.  Says he has rheumatism in the past five years.  Upon examination:  Pulse rate 88, respiration 18, temperature 98 1/2, height 5 ft. 5 1/2 inches, weight 130 pounds, age 47 years. 

Body well nourished, skin healthy, tongue coated brown, gums healthy, conjunctiva congested, arcus senilis in both eyes, Pterygiun in both eyese, liver trudy on pressure, spleen tender on pressure, he has sciatica along the whole course of sciatica on left side, there is arthristic rheumatism of both shoulder & elbow joints with crepitation in all.  There is no enlargment of joints but much tenderness on pressure.  Motion of all said joints is limited about one half.  The rect muscle of back on right side are very much hardened and those on the left side are atrophied, motion of hip and knee joints on right side are limited about one half.  Motion of similar joints on left side is somewhat less, hearts action feeble with slightly stenosis of the Aortic valve apea beat about 1 1/2 inches below left nipple, pulse after coming up on flight of stairs registers 10 f. Rectum congested two pil tumors 1/2 an inche in diameter each.  No other disease found to exist. 

He is in our opinion entitled to a 12/18 rating for the disability caused by Rheumatism & 2/18 for the cause of Piles and 9/18 for the caused by other disabilities. Signed by Smith, Moloney and Caldwell – the Board.

11.  January 15, 1898 – #662988 Dept. of the Interior, Alexander Barclay.  Are you married? Answer:  I was never married and have no adopted children.  Date: July 4th, 1898, Signed Alexander Barclay. 

12.  June 9, 1906 – Pensioner Dropped, U.S. Pension Agency, Milwaukee, Wis. INVALID, Class June 27th, 1890, Soldier:  Alexander Barclay, Service Pri & Corp. Co. 4 Minn.  Paid at $12.00 to October 4, 1905.  Dropped:  Death 9 Dec. 1905, E.D. Coe US Pension Agent.

13.  Card June 9, 1906 – Cert No. 662988, Alexander Barclay, Issued Sept. 29, 1891, Mailed October 10, 1891.  Rate and Period:  $12, from Aug. 23, 1890.  Dropped Jun 9, 1906.  Dead.

In 26 November 1891 Alexander joined his local GAR Canby Post #47. This is the Grand Army of the Republic.  Wikipedia has an article with references about this organization which was very popular during the later part of the 1800′s and early 1900′s.  The records are hit and miss but still worth trying to find.  You may find them in the state archives or check in the local area at a genealogical society or historical. 

The GAR has a museum in Philadelphia that might be worth checking out:  http://garmuslib.org/  This organization concentrates on PA and NY but they might be able to advise how to find the local GAR in a specific area?

The History of Dakota County, City of Hastings, 1891 by Rev. Edward D. Neill and J. Fletcher Williams, pg. 380-381, North Star Publishing 1881, talked a little about Alexander’s experiences. 

“Alexander A. Barclay was born in Hartford, Connecticut, 1843. Came to Minnesota with his brother at the age of twelve years and settled in Scott county. In 1861, he enlisted in Company C, First Minnesota Volunteer Infantry and at the expiration of the ninety day’s term, re-enlisted in Company C, Fourth Minnesota, serving in the army of the Tennessee through the war; participated in the leading battles of that army, among which were the siege at Vicksburg, Atlanta, and on the “March to the Sea.” His command took part in the grand review at Washington in June 1865, and was finally mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, in July of that year. Mr. Barclay returned to Scott County, and in 1872, removed to his present home in Eureka township.”

Unfortunately I do not have a picture of my great great Uncle and I tried to find something to represent his journey and participation in this review.

Wikipedia has an article about the Grand Review.  It was the parade that took place in Washington D.C. at the end of the Civil War.  This article suggests other sources that have more photographs of this event.  I was told that it would be very difficult to find photographs because they didn’t have the expertise at the time to take pictures of moving objects.  Perhaps I should have kept digging.  The Library of Congress might be another possibility.  There is a great photograph of the soldiers on their horses riding down the street at this article and other articles with photos: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Review_of_the_Armies

 

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