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Archive for the ‘Alexander Barclay’ Category

Alexander Barclay (Barkley) was a soldier in Co. C, 4th Regiment, Volunteer Infantry from Minnesota.  

Once again I seek out this book with a slight variation in author: 

Book:  The Civil and Indian Wars of Minnesota, 1891,  Narrative of the 4th Regiment by Captain Alonzo L. Brown, pages 195 to 220.    There was a copy of this book in the Minnesota Historical Society, Ancestry.com has a copy and Internet Archives at: http://www.archive.org/details/minnesotacivil01minnrich  

“The men were mostly from Dakota county, the headquarters of the company being at Lakeville.  The company proceeded to Fort Snelling and was mustered in on October 7th…” pg. 198. 

“On March 18th, (1862) adjutant General O. Malmros issued an order for the regiment to proceed to St. Louis.  This order he modified on the 19th, by directing a delay of the movement until the opening of navigation.” pg. 199. 

My goal here is not to rewrite the history of this regiment but to identify dates and locations of Alexanders regiment to his brother George’s regimental movements.  This version of the 4th’s history is very detailed and a summary of the events.  The map shows Red for the 9th Reg’t. (George) and Turquoise for the 4th Reg’t (Alex) and Purple for General Sherman highlighting the March to the Sea and through the Carolinas. 

Map of 9th & 4th Reg't Movement

 

 1.  Off to the South April 20, 1862 to April 23, 1862: St. Louis, Benton Barracks on the outskirts of the city. 

On April 20, 1862 the side-wheel steamboat Sucker State landed at Fort Snelling, and six companies of the regiment, accompanied by the regimental band, and in command of Lt. Colonel Thomas, embarked upon it and started for St. Louis, to report to Major General Halleck.  As the boat approached St. Paul the bluffs and river banks were crowded with people who waved their hands and ‘kerchiefs…the steamer soon swung around and headed down stream on its journey, the band playing “The Girl I Left Behind Me….” 

Website on Benton Barracks with wonderful pictures: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/mo/county/stlouis/benton.htm 

 2.  On Sunday, 2nd of May, 1862 the regiment left Benton Barracks on the steamboat John J. Roe and landed at Cairo and Paducah then proceeded up the Tennessee River.  They arrived at Fort Henry and moved up the river another eight miles and disembarked at Paris Landing.  On the boat the Gladiator they proceed further up the Tennessee River to Brown Landing, Tennessee arriving on the 13th.  On May 14th they arrived at Hamburg Landing, Tennessee and left the Gladiator marching two miles to Childer’s Hill where they encamped.  The next day they marched to join the army under General Halleck and were assigned to the First Brigade (Buford’s), Third Division (Hamilton’s), Army of the Mississippi. 

Here is a link to Wikipedia’s biography of General Henry W. Halleck:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Wager_Halleck  

3.  Seige of Corinth May 12th to August 1862:  Moved toward Corinth slowly and on the 18th of May advanced to Farmington.  May 30th they discovered the enemy had evacuated and they pursued them 20 miles south to Boonville (maybe Booneville, MS) and then returned to fives miles from Corinth established camp at Clear Creek.  During the latter part of June they marched toward Holly Springs passing through Rienzi and on as far as Ripley then returned to Clear Creek.  In August they marched 12 miles to Jacinto

4.  Battle of Iuka September 19, 1862:  Jacinto to Iuka…the battle began on the 19th and 20th of September returning to Jacinto and then within three miles of Corinthhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Iuka 

5.  Battle of Corinth October 3-4, 1862: http://americancivilwar.com/statepic/ms/ms002.html 

6.  Campaign down the Mississippi Central Railroad:  Left Corinth and marched to Grand Junction and then onto Holly Springs.  Then from Davis Mills to LaGrange and west to Moscow then marched with Grant during the last of November to Cold Water, Holly Springs and the Tallahatchie River.   Traveled down the Mississippi Central railroad in November 1862 to reach Vicksburg and fell back to Oxford and then back to Memphis

7.  The Yazoo Pass Expedition in the winter of 1862 was organized to turn the enemy’s right at Haines Bluff and compelling the evacuation of that position and using it for operations against Vicksburg.  

8.  Battle of Port Gibson May 1863:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Port_Gibson  

9.  Battle of Milliken’s Bend June 7, 1863:  Above Vicksburg along the Mississippi River:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Milliken’s_Bend  

9. Running the Batteries — Vicksburg:  From Milliken’s Bend to the point a little below Grand Gulf the army embarked and cross the river to Bruinsburg.  No losses at Port Gibson, Forty Hills on May 3rd, nor Raymond on May 12th and at Jackson on May 14th. 

9.   Battle of Champion Hills  May 16, 1863 and after this battle aided in building a bridge across the Big Black so the Seventeenth Corps could cross to go to Vicksburg. http://battleofchampionhill.org/ 

10.  Seige of and Assault on Vicksburg May to July 1863:  They aided other units. They traveled to Mechanicsburg and then moved down to Snyder’s Bluff near Vicksburg and later to Vicksburg and formed a part of the army of occupation of that city after its surrender. http://www.nps.gov/vick/index.htm 

11.  Battle of Chattanooga:  Left Vicksburg on 12th of September, 1863 for Little Rock and Helena and then to Memphis.  Marched to Chattanooga via Winchester over the Cumberland Mountains to Sweden Cove and on to Bridgeport.  Bivouacked in the ravines near Crane’s Hill across from Chattanooga Nov. 23, 24, 25, 1863. General Sherman’s army landed above the city of Chattanooga.  Then they marched to Bridgeport and on to Huntsville and went to destroy ferryboats passing through Madison Station and back to Huntsvillehttp://www.aotc.net/Chattanooga.htm 

12.  Battle of Altoona (Spelled Allatoona) Oct 5, 1864:  Arrived in Stevenson, Alabama and proceeded to Kingston, Georgia in time to celebrate the 4th of July (1864).  Marched from Kingston to Altoona and formed a part of the force stationed there.  Altoona is 40 miles north of Atlanta.  The 4th Regiment was in the thick of this battle to protect General Sherman’s supplies and communications.   Atlanta was captured about September 2d and Hood left. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Allatoona 

13.  March to the Sea:  After Atlanta was taken 

“During the progress of the battle, General Sherman, from the heights of Kenesaw Mountain, and about eighteen miles away, toward Atlanta, signaled to Altoona to learn if Corse had arrived, and received a signal reply that satisfied him, and this circumstance is referred to in the song, “Hold the Fort for I am Coming.”  Sherman’s army soon followed closely after Hood’s, who retreated toward Alabama, and in a few days our communications were again open.  Active preparations were now made for the campaign through Georgia to Savannah.  Supplies were rapidly brought to the front, the convalescents and those unable to travel were sent North, and the army was stripped of surplus animals and property, which were sent to the rear, and on the 14th of November it had assembled at and near Atlanta.  On the 15th it started on the March to the Sea.” pg. 216.  

“Our regiment marched with the rest of General John E. Smith’s Third Division of the Fifteenth Corps, Colonel Tourtellotte in command, and having received several hundred recruits from Minnesota while at Altoona, during the months of September and October, was pretty full in numbers.” pg. 216. 

“The kind people of Georgia made but little opposition to our advance.  Their sweet potato patches were generally numerous, their corncribs abundant, and the melody of their garden fowls sounded as sweetly to the ears of our “bummers” as that of their relatives…And as the country had not been stripped of its supplies by the operation of hostile forces, it yielded sufficient, so that, with the rations carried in the army trains, and a very large drove of cattle that we started with, there was not much suffering on the excursion through the state.  There were no battles, and only an occasional skirmish fought.  With the exception of three rainy days the weather was pleasant during the entire time previous to December 7th…On arriving at Gordon…destroyed a mile and a half of the Macon railroad…Our army arrived before Savannah on the 10th day of December…Our rations got short on approaching the vicinity of Savannah and the men suffered considerable privation.  The city having been evacuated by Hardee’s forces, our army took possession on the 21st.”  pg.216 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherman’s_March_to_the_Sea 

From this point the Sherman Marched through the Carolinas by boat to Beaufort, rains flood the Savannah river and they had trouble with the wagons crossing and lost some of them.  Marched inland from Beaufort to by Pocotoligo to McPhersonville around January 31st (1865), arriving at Duck Creek

Out regiment was sent to drive them away, and after deploying several companies as skirmishers, out boys charged through the stream, which was waist-deep, and found a fine plantation on the other side.” pg. 217. 

 They then moved on to the Salkehatchie Swamp and River and came to the railroad near Bamberg where they destroyed the rails.  From there they marched across the Edisto River toward Orangeburg then turned north toward Columbia marching through that city on the 17th of February (1865) establishing camp outside Columbia.  They left Columbia on the 20th after they destroyed ammunition and ordnance stores of the enemy.  Marched over high, rocky and rolling country to the Wateree River and the vicinity of Little Lynches Creek although the land was flat the rain fell “incessantly.”  Moved over to the Big Lynches Creek in prep to fight the enemy but found flood waters which they crossed to Cheraw reaching that on March 3rd to find more supplies of the enemy to use.  They remained a few days and marched to Fayetteville dealing with rain and mud on this march. 

“On arriving near Shoe-Heel Creek, our men worked all night long, pulling and lifting the mule teams and wagons over a bottomless swamp, rain falling incessantly.  On the 12th of March we reached the vicinity of Fayetteville, and crossing the Cape Fear River, established our camp near the town.  We left this camp in a rainstorm, and marching all day, over, under and through a flat country, night overtook us stuck in the mud, with the teams down in all directions.  For three days we fought with the elements of mud and rain.” pg. 217.  

14.  Battle of Bentonville took place on the 19th, 20th and 21st of March 1865 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Bentonville when Johnson retreated they marched to Goldsboro and camped near that city.  They left there on April 10th and marched for Raleigh and camped near the city.  Johnson surrendered on April 26th and they learned of President Lincoln’s assassination.  On the 29th of April they marched for Richmond and on to Washington passing through Petersburg and arrived at Richmond on the 10th of May near Manchester.  From Richmond they marched through Fredericksburg, Dumfries and the grounds of Mt. Vernon viewing George Washington’s grave and onto Alexandria

“On the 24th of May the regiment marched at the head of the column of General Sherman’s grand army of 65,000 veterans in the review at Washington, and, passing through the city, established its camp five miles out at Crystal Springs.  Leaving its camp near Washington the last of May, the regiment marched to the city and with the rest of the Army of the Tennessee moved by rail to Parkersburg on the Ohio River.  Embarking on the steamboat Champion, it proceeded with the rest of the army down the river to Louisville, Ky. and established its camp near that city, and there remained until July 19, 1865, when it was mustered for discharge out of the service.  The next day the command embarked upon the cars and proceeded on its journey to St. Paul, passing through Indianapolis, Chicago and Milwaukee.  On arriving at La Crosse we embarked on the steamboat Northern Belle, and on July 24th arrive at St. Paul.” pg. 218   

In summary, I think we know who “Marched to the Sea.”  Alexander applied for his Civil War Pension and in those documents from the National Archive I find more evidence that Alex was with Sherman.

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Let us turn our attention to Alexander Barclay’s Civil War Service record and see if we cannot find any clues to this mystery of which brother “Marched to the Sea’ with General Sherman.  I obtained Alex’s Civil War service record from the National Archives before they increased the fee and see the Blogroll to the right for the link.

Fort Snelling 1820-1830

George’s brother Alexander Barclay mustered in to the Civil War at Fort Snelling approximate one year before George.

I visited Fort Snelling near Minneapolis and St. Paul.  The photo shows the fort as it was in about 1827, which is 34 years earlier than the Civil War but inside the museum buildings they have maps and pictures that show the fort through the years.  It gave me an idea of what it might have been like for both George and Alexander.  The Minnesota Historical Society has many historical properties like this that you can visit if you become a member and travel in Minnesota.  I have a link under Blogroll to the right for the society. 

Alexander’s Civil War Service record was listed under “Barkley.”  Alex has 27 cards in his service record. 

1. Company Muster-in Roll:  (All cards have B, 4, Minn at the top)

Alex Musters In

 Alexander Barkley, Pv, Capt. Donaldson’s Co., 4 Reg’t Minn. Vol.s* (*This organization subsequently became Co. C, 4 Reg’t. Minn Inf.), Age 19 years. Ft. Snelling, Minn. Oct. 7, 1861, joined for duty and enrolled Sept 25, 1861 at Ft. Snelling for 3 years.  R.M. Elliott, Copist.2.  Company Muster Roll:

Alexander Barkley, Pv, Co., C, 4 Reg’t Minnesota Infantry. Nov. & Dec. 1861, Present, R.M. Elliott, Copist.

3.  Company Muster Roll:

Jan & Feby, 1862, Present, R. M. Elliott, Copist.

4.  Company Muster Roll:

Mch & Aprl, 1862, Present, R.M. Elliott, Copist.

5.  Company Muster Roll:

May/June 1862, Present, R.M. Elliott, Copist.

6.  Company Muster Roll:

July & Aug, 1862, Present, R.M. Elliott, Copist.

7.  Company Muster Roll:

Sept & Oct., 1862, Present, R.M. Elliott, Copist.

8.  Company Muster Roll:

Nov & Dec., 1862, Present, R.M. Elliott

9.  Company Muster Roll:

Jan & Feb., 1863, Present, R.M. Elliott, Copist.

10.  Special Muster Roll: 

Dated Apl 18, 1863, Present, Remarks:  Sick in quarters., J.R. Funk, Copist.

11.  Company Muster Roll:

Mch & Apl, 1863, Present, J. R. Funk, Copist.

12.  Company Muster Roll:

May & June, 1863, Present, J.R. Funk, Copist.

13.  Company Muster Roll:

July & Aug. 1863, Present, Jr. R. Funk, Copist.

14.  Company Muster Roll: 

Sept & Oct, 1863, Present, J.R. Funk, Copist.

15.  Company Muster Roll:

Nov & Dec, 1863, Present, J.R. Funk, Copist.

 16.  Detachment Muster-out Roll:

Alex Musters Out!

Muster-out to date Dec 31, 1863, Last Paid to Oct. 31, 1863. Roll dated Huntsville, Ala. Feb. 5, 1864.  Clothing account:  Last settled Dec 31, 1862; drawn since $23.23, due soldier $18.77.  Due U.S. – $100.00.  Remarks:  Dischged by virtue of re-enl. as Vet Vol. under the provisions of G.O. 191 series of 1863 from the W.D., H.E. Arnold, Copyist. 

 

17.  M. and D. Roll of Veteran Volunteers:

Roll dated Huntsville, Ala. Feb. 5, 1864. When enlisted Jan 1, 1864, When mustered into date Jan 1, 1864.  Bounty paid, $60.00. Remarks: Remustered as Vet. Vol. under G.O. No. 191, War Dept. Series 1863., Wines, Copist.

NOTE:  There were two enlistment papers in Alex’s file. 

First page:  his “Volunteer Enlistment” in Alabama at Huntsville.  Alexander Barkley born in Hartford Co., Connecticut, aged nineteen years, by occupation a soldier do hereby acknowledge to have volunteered this first day of January 1864 to serve as a Soldier in the Army of the United States of America for the period of 3 years….sworn and subscribed to at Huntsville, Ala. this 1st day of January, 1864 before Wm. T. [Killbridge], Reg’t 4th Minn., signed Alexander Barkley. Examined by E. W. Cross, 4th Minn. Vol. Inft. Examing Surgeon..the soldier has hazel eyes, light hair, light complexion, is 5 ft, 3-1/2 inches high. [James C. Edson, Cprt. 4th Reg. of Minn. Voltrs. Mustered into service…C. 4th Reg. of Minnesota Vol. on the first day of January, 1864, at Huntsville, Alabama, [     ] W. Osborne, Capt. 12th Infantry, A.C. M. 3rd Div. 15th Army Corps.

The second page was the “Declaration of the Recruit” which repeats much of the same information listed above.

18.  Company Muster Roll:

Jan & Feb. 1864, Present, Vet. Vols., J.R. Funk, copist.

19.  Company Muster Roll:

Mch & Apl, 1864, Present, Remarks: Vet Vol., J.R. Funk, Copist.

20.  Company Muster Roll:

May & June, 1864, Present, Sullivan, Copist.

21.  Company Muster Roll:

July & Aug., 1864, Sullivan, Copist.

22.  Company Muster Roll:

Sept. & Oct., 1864, Present.  Remarks:  Promoted from Private Oct. 12, 1864 S.O. 47, Regt. Hd. Qrs., Sullivan, Copist. Corpl. Alexander Barkley, Co. C, 4th Reg’t Minnesota Infantry. 

23.  Company Muster Roll:

Nov. & Dec., 1864, Present, Remarks:  Promoted from private Oct. 12, 1863 S.O. 47, Regt. Hd. Qrs., Sullivan, Copist.

Note:  Sherman’s March to the Sea started on Nov. 18, 1864.

24.  Company Muster Roll:

Jan & Feb, 1865, Present, Remarks:  Appointed from private Oct. 12, 1864. S.O. 47, Regt. Hd. Qrs., Sullivan, Copist.

25.  Company Muster Roll:

Mch & Apr. 1865, Present, Remarks:  Promoted from private Oct. 12/64 S.O. 47, Reg. Hd. Qrs., Sullivan, Copist.

26.  Company Muster Roll:

May & June, 1864, Present, Sullivan, Copist.

27.  Co. Muster-out Roll:

Final Muster Out!

Alexander Barkley, Corpl., Co. C, 4, Reg’t, Minn. Inf., Age 21 years, roll dated Louisville, Ky, July 19, 1865, Muster-out date, July 19, 1865, Last paid Apr. 30, 1865. Clothing Account: due U.S. $15.00.  Due US for arms…$0, Bounty paid, $210.00; due $190.00. Remarks:  Promoted from Private Oct. 12/64. Easterling, [Compant/Compaut].

Note:  Brackets indicate that I cannot read the writing and I am guessing.

There is nothing in Alexander’s Civil War Service record that states anything unusual about his service other than he re-enlisted at the end of 1864 and was promoted to Corporal about the time of Sherman’s march.  The spelling of the Barclay name as “Barkley” means that Alex used a different version than his brother George. 

In the next post we will examine the events of Co. C, 4th Reg’t of the Minnesota Infantry and we will discover some very interesting information!

 

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My great-grandfather George Angus Barclay mustered into the Civil War a year after his brother Alexander Barclay.  Their father John Barclay also served for a very short time as a carpenter, which was his occupation.   They all served out of Minnesota.  

In the Logsled to Snowmobiles book written by the town of Pine River for their bicentennial in 1973, it is implied that George and Alexander entered military service together.  This did not happen.  Alexander went in first in Sept 1861 and George followed him a year later.  There father served much later in the war.  

“…and together they enlisted on August 15, 1862 in the Union Army! pg. 104 Logsleds to Snowmobiles.  

The date of August 15, 1862 is correct for George’s enlistment.  He mustered in at Fort Ridgely http://www.mnhs.org/places/sites/fr/  It was two days before the Dakota Indian uprising began!  (See the Wikipedia article link given below.) 

I worked at a local community college in years past and a coworker of mine had retired from the Army.  He had served in the Quartermaster’s Department and was a Civil War buff.  We sat down and I showed him the records I had received and he studied them.  He told me:   

First, I was lucky to get the Civil War service and pension files for a lot of the more common soldiers did not get recorded.  Apparently my ancestors had skills that were needed. 

Secondly, George might have been too young and small to enter with Alexander, who was about 19 years old in 1861 when he mustered in.  George maybe needed to mature physically or get some skills?  My great-grandfather was not a big man as you will see.  George would be 18 in 1862 and that might have been why he was delayed although I am aware that younger boys were in this war.  It is fun to speculate.  

Back in 2001 I had the good fortune to travel to Minnesota and visit the state.  I became a member of the Minnesota Historical Society and they offer admission to various historical sites among them are Fort Ridgely and Fort Snelling.  

Fort Ridgely, Minnesota

 

Fort Ridgely Museum

 

I was told that the farmers in the area took away the stones to use in their houses and fields after the Civil War.  These stones had been used to build the barracks and other buildings at Fort Ridgely.  The only remains are the outlines of the buildings in the ground so that is why you don’t see anything except the museum and monument.  The museum has a lot of wonderful exhibits and one in particular was the soldiers’ uniform.  I have often wondered what happened to George’s coat and was told he probably worn it till it wore out.  

They also have exhibits about the Dakota Indian uprising.  I asked if George would have received any training and the volunteer at the museum told me that he probably was just dumped into the fight fresh.  The monument you see in the first photo has the names of the soldiers that didn’t survive the conflict imprinted on it.  

Wikipedia has some very interesting information about this conflict:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dakota_War_of_1862  

The Fort Ridgely volunteer also got excited and looked George up in his records and found him.  

“George became a wagoner with Company A, Ninth Volunteer Infantry. pg. 104 Logsleds to Snowmobiles. “ 

This statement is true about George’s service in the Civil War but he was in company “I” not “A.”  He was a wagoner and he did serve and survived.  A lot of men did not for my coworker friend told me that it was a cruel war.  

I was very fortunate to order the civil war service and pension records for George, Alexander and John Barclay before The National Archives (NARA) increased the cost.  In my opinion it is worth it.  I have learned so much about my ancestors from these files.  

I will describe the Civil War experiences of these three men in the following posts.

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Minnesota 1857 Census

 

By 1857 George and Alexander are living with their father John Barclay in Eagle Creek, Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota. 

On Line 20 we find John Barclay age 46, male, white, born in Scotland and a farmer.  Below him is Alex age 16 born in Connecticut and then there is George age 14 born in Connecticut.  

Here is the beginning of evidence that points to Connecticut as Alexander and George’s birthplace.  

The question is how did they get from Connecticut to Minnesota? 

The Logsleds to Snowmobile Book by the city of Pine River gives this statement: 

“Sometime before the Civil War his mother died, and George and his brother, Alexander, were placed in different foster homes.  George ran away from his “turf family,” found his brother, and together they enlisted on August 13, 1862 in the Union Army.” page 104.  

What a great and wonderful adventure these two young men would have had.  I often ponder it, wondering what route they took, what sights they saw.  How did they know their father was in Minnesota?  

I have been to Enfield and drove from Enfield to East Windsor where the 1850 Census places these brothers living near each other.  I was curious as to the distance.  It is close and took about 5-10 minutes to drive it.  Two young boys without means they would have had to walk to get to each other unless they talked a good story to someone and hitched a ride.  It is doable.  

Based on the 1850 Census which I have discussed in past posts (April 11, 2010) we have seen that Alexander was in East Windsor and George was in Enfield, Connecticut. 

I have a theory.  There was an older brother name John Avery Barclay who would have been about 20 or 21 years old in 1857.  I talked about the 1850 Census for Enfield in which I found a John Bartley about the right age living in Enfield (April 18, 2010 post).  Alex was 16 and George 14 when they were with their father in 1857.  Maybe this is a little more involved than is realized?  

Their older brother John Avery Barclay takes up residence in Silbey Co., Minnesota in the 1860 Census.  He is living in Kelso and farming.  He is 25 years old.  The only evidence that this John is a brother is from Alexander’s probate file.  I will talk more about this brother and his family in future posts.  

Of course this is idea that they all came together is speculation on my part.  

As for the comment about the Civil War, well it is not quite right.  Alexander enlisted first and then George followed him a year later.  I will discuss the Civil War service of Alexander, George and John Barclay Sr. in future posts.  Each person was involved in very different ways and all survived to live for many years beyond.

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George and his brother Alexander have been identified in the 1850 Connecticut census for Enfield and East Windsor. 

Things get even more interesting when a reference to an Agness Barclay is found.  She is living in 1850 in Enfield in close proximity to George and Alexander.  One of George and Alex’s sisters is named Sarah Agnes which was determined from Alexander’s probate file. 

1850 Census - Agnes Barclay

The family begins on line 5, Dwelling 429, family 641.  It is headed by an Alpheus Pease, age 65, married and a farmer with $3500 in real estate,  born in Connecticut. He is followed by Lois Pease age 61 born in Connecticut.  There doesn’t seem to be any children listed for this couple unless you look down below and you find on line 18 a Alpheus D. Pease age 35 with a wife and children named Pease.  On line 24 we have a Thomas C. Pease age 35 and family which you cannot see from the sample above. 

These names follow as best I can interpret them as they come after Lois Pease:

  • Maranda Stevens age 28, female
  • Luthara age 3/12 , female
  • Sarah L. Wilson age 13 female with a B by her name

Starting here is a line with the notation “Town Poor” and listed as “Pauper” from line 11 to line 17.

  • Line 10 – Betsey Chapin age 75, female
  • Line 11 – Gennett Earl age 74, female
  • Line 12 – Amy Mills age 74, female
  • Line 13 – Stephen Mills age 55,  male
  • line 14 –  Agness Barclay age 4, female, born in Connecticut
  • line 15 – James Lynch age 2 male, born in Scotland
  • line 16 – Robert Mollis/Hollis age 6 male, born CT
  • line 17 – Julia Wheeler age 4 female, born CT

As we continue to dig into the census we find several other interesting possibilities for George and Alexander’s siblings.

1850 Connecticut John Bartley

A  John Bartley is living with the Olmstead family in Enfield.  The spelling is slightly different.  I have seen this spelling version of the Barclay surname before in other documents.  The family starts on line 9 with an Obadiah Olmstead age 34 male, farmer with $4000 in real estate, born in Connecticut.  He is followed by Hannah age 30, [Sauranu] age 7 female and Frederick age 4 male.  John is on line 13.  This John is 16 years old which means he was born about 1834 and born in Scotland.  John is followed by a James Boyle age 28 farmer, born in Ireland.  This John Bartley is a strong possibility for the older brother of George and Alex. 

1850 Connecticut - James Barclay

The next possible sibling is James Barclay.  There is a reference in the 1850 U.S. Federal Census for Litchfield, Litchfield County, Connecticut on Line 29, Dwelling 131, Family 144 a family starting with a Joshua D. Berry age 40, male, Epis Clergyman with $10,000, born NH.  He is followed by Jane Berry age 28, F, born Ct.,  After her is the James Barclay age 12 male, born Ireland that is of interest.  The census states he is Irish but that could be an easy error?  This boy is born about 1838.  He is a possible candidate for another brother of George and Alexander.  Litchfield is to the west of the others so this James is suspect.

Mary J. Barclay 1850 Connecticut

Mary J. Bartley also appears in the 1850 census in East Windsor closer to Alexander and living with yet another family by the name of Rees.  The family starts on line 24 with 179/216 Lydia P. Rees age 62, with $2000 and born in Connecticut.  Under her is Lydia F. Rees age 31 and she is followed by Mary J. Barclay on line 26, age 10 and also born in Connecticut.  James [McDonahue] age 9 and born in Ireland is last.  So this is a strong possibility that it is a sister.

In review we have George, Alexander, Agnes, John, Mary J. and a possible James Barclay all about the right ages to be siblings living in the general vicinity of each other in 1850 in Connecticut.  I think it is too compelling to be ignored.   Hopefully, I have interpreted other census and Alex’s probate file correctly regarding the ages of his siblings.  So out of seven (7) siblings we find six (6).  We are missing Martha. 

We return to the quotation from the Logsleds to Snowmobile book (history of Pine River, Minnesota) makes this statement on pg. 105.

Sometime before the Civil War his mother died.  George and his brother Alexander were placed in different foster homes…”

The Barclay siblings are living with families with surnames of Berry, Pease, Olmstead, Barber, William and Rees.  Some of these names are very much a part of the history of Enfield, Connecticut.  The chances of them being family members is still a possibility but more likely they are taking in the “town poor” and caring for them.

The website an Historical Overview of the American Poorhouse System talks about the history of the poorhouse and how poor people were dealt with.  Other ways to care for the poor could include 1) outdoor relief provided by an Overseer of the Poor and 2) auctioning off the poor and 3) contracting with someone in the community for care of paupers:  http://www.poorhousestory.com/history.htm

From this and a few other articles looking in state records, selectman/overseer’s of the poor reports, town and meeting records of a specific town and then local newspapers for auction dates are possibilities for future research.

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In trying to verify the birthdate and find the birthplace of George Angus Barclay I tracked him back in the U.S. Federal Census to 1850 in Connecticut.   All evidence for census and other documents were pointing to Connecticut as his birthplace not Scotland or New Jersey.  A census search of 1850 does not reveal a George Barclay of this age born in New Jersey. 

The census does reveal a George Barclay living in Enfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut at the age of six years old.  He is living with an entirely different family and not with his parents.

1850 Enfield Census

It looks like George is part of  two households.  The family he is living with starts with a notation on line 15 and begins with a Lucy William age 65 with $4000 real estate value. Under her is Lucy M. William age 27. Then we start another family on line 17 with an Edwin D. William listed as age 26. Under him is Margret P. William age 26, born in NJ.  We follow with George Barclay 6 years old born.  He attended school within the year.  All the people listed have been born in Connecticut except Margret.

Running a census search for members of this Williams family in 1860 reveals no Lucy, Edwin or Margret living in the Enfield area or in Hartford County.  

So who are these people? 

I am suspicious about Margret.  The name is the same as the one given for George’s mother.  It might be coincidence.  The fact that she is born in New Jersey is interesting. It has been suggested by Aunt Miriam that George was born in New Jersey.  It is possible that the parents divorced?  Her age is maybe a little to young for being a mother of 7 children.   Is she John Barclay’s sister.  If John was born in 1801 as indicated on documents I have collected, he would be 49 years old.  So he is probably a little too old to be a brother.  Things are not looking good for this Margret William as a candidate for George’s mother, but we will remain open to all possibilities at this time.

Nearby in East Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut which is southeast of Enfield we find Alexander Barclay. He is living with yet another family and is about the right age for George’s brother.

The family we are interested in starts on line 20 with an [Alonso] Barber age 30 who is a farmer with $2500.  Next comes a Nancy Barber age 25.  We then have Alfred at 3 years of age, next is [Frederic] at 1 year of age.  [Lorain] Peas follows at age 17.  Last we find Alex Barclay at age 9 years.  All are born in Connecticut.  Alex has attended school in the last year. 

In running a census search for this Barber family in 1860, you can find them still living in Enfield.  They do not  have any children listed in their family group with a different family name.    These two families the Barbers and Williams have means and money. 

Where are John Barclay and Margaret? I have been unable to find any reference to John or Margaret in the U.S. census for 1850 or  in 1840 that fits.  All my Aunt Miriam knew about Margaret was that “she died before the Civil War.” 

With this information, I decided to write the Enfield City Hall to see if I could find a birth record for George.  They wrote back that they were unable to locate a birth record for a George A. Barclay. 

The Logsleds to Snowmobile book (history of Pine River, Minnesota) makes this statement on pg. 105.

Sometime before the Civil War his mother died.  George and his brother Alexander were placed in different foster homes…”

In the next post we will dig further into the Connecticut census and discover the possibility of other Barclay children nearby and living with other families in Hartford Co., Connecticut.

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John Barclay, my great great grandfather, was introduced to me by my Aunt Miriam in her family history notes, so I knew about him.  I also had a copy of the book by the city of Pine River, celebrating their first 100 years, and he is mentioned in that book: 

  “…not far from Shakopee where George’s father chose to live “because it reminded him of his native Scotland.”  Apparently the father, John, remarried and had other children…”  

John Barclay had two families.  He was first married to Margaret.  When he married Margaret is not known and where she is buried is also unknown.  She probably died in Connecticut but so far a search of records reveal only one possibility of a Margaret Barclay dying in Enfield in 1848 of about the right age. 

continuing the quote above…” because at the time of Alexander’s death in 1906, there was quite a bit of difficulty in locating all the Barclay heirs from “both families.”” pg. 105 

In my Aunt Miriam’s notes she mentions Alexander’s probate: 

Alex's Probate

 

My great-uncle Alexander Barclay has been very good to me.  I secured his probate file at some expense from the Dakota County Courthouse in Minnesota and it opened up a very big genealogical door!  

From this first marriage came seven (7) siblings that were listed in Alexander’s estate file.  There wasn’t a will so some of the information is carefully taken from the probate file.  Other information such as census searches and indexes were also used.  I am slowly gathering the facts together on the siblings and will present more at a later time. 

1.  John Avery Barclay born abt 1836, died – unknown.  According to Alex’s estate file he disappeared and was presumed dead as stated in an affidavit of his sister Sarah Agnes. He appears in deeds, land records, and court documents in Silbey Co., Minnesota till about 1880.  He may have gone to California.  John Avery Barclay was probably born in Scotland per census information and other sources but that is not yet proven.  John married Minerva  Parks on 3 July 1865 in Henderson, Sibley Co., Minnesota.  Since John Avery Barclay was considered dead his two children where his heirs and they are mentioned in the estate file.  The couple actually had four children:  

1. John Avery Barclay II born 23 July 1867 in Sibley Co., Minnesota and died 8 March 1951 in Seattle, King Co., Washington.   

2. Sarah Ellen born 29 March 1869 in Sibley Co., Minnesota.   

3 and 4. There were two other children twins: Albert and Alice born 1870 Silbey Co.,  Minnesota but it is looking like they didn’t survive.  Some of this information was supplied by another cousin.  

2.  James A. Barclay born about 1838 in Connecticut, he died about 1906 in Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., Connecticut during the probate process of Alexander’s estate.  He married a Maryanne Stewart and had children.  

3.  Sarah Agnes Barclay born about 1840 in Connecticut.  She married Porter Blinn about 1860 in Connecticut.  He was born about 1842 in Connecticut.  They had 6 children and it looks like they stayed in Newington, Hartford Co. , Connecticut. 

Update:  May 26, 2010 – I was at the Family History Library researching when I discovered that the Sarah that I thought was Sarah Agnes Barclay in the census married to Porter Blinn was the Sarah I should be studying for the Barclay’s.  Turns out she is a Griswold and her father is Henry Griswold.  So back to the drawing board on #3.  This is why it is so important to check other sources like marriages and birth records and not totally trust the census. 

4.  Mary J. Barclay born about 1841 in Connecticut and died 28 March 1917 in Bristol, Hartford Co., Connecticut.  I have her estate file.  She married a Jerome B. Ford and had 3 daughters.  Jerome was born about 1846 in Connecticut. 

5. Alexander A. Barclay was born September 1842 in Hartford, Connecticut and died on 9 December 1905 at the Rochester Hospital for the Insane in Olmsted Co., Minnesota.  He apparently suffered in the end with dementia.  He was only in the hospital about 6 days before he died.  He was buried 17 December 1905 in the Corinithian Cemetery in Farmington, Dakota Co., Minnesota. 

6.  Martha M. Barclay born about 1843 in Connecticut and died around 1920 or later in California.  She married a Jeremiah Ford in about 1859 in Connecticut.  I do not know if Jeremiah and Jerome were brothers.  Martha and Jeremiah had two daughters.  

7.  George Angus Barclay was born 18 August 1844 probably in Connecticut and died on the 28th of October 1898 in Pine River, Cass Co., Minnesota.  George is the subject of our blog and more information will be forthcoming on his life. He married Amarilla Spracklin in 1878 and they had 2 children. 

The second marriage of John Barclay was to Helen in Scott Co., Minnesota.  I have not been able to find their marriage in Minnesota records but it happened prior to 1860 per the census and from this marriage their were four (4) children born. 

8.  Charles Barclay was born about January 1860 in Eagle Creek (Shakopee), Scott Co., Minnesota.  After the death of his mother in 1907 he seems to have moved from Shakopee and might have gone to Minneapolis and died about 1938.  Charles didn’t marry as far as I can determine from census and other documents. 

9.  William Barclay was born about 1863 in Eagle Creek (Shakopee), Scott Co., Minnesota and died 7 Dec 1937 in Gallatin Co., Montana.  He married a Clara E, probably in Minnesota.  She was born about 1859 in Wisconsin and died about 21 March 1919 in Madison Co., Montana.  They had one child name Foster born 1891 and probably died by 1907.  

10.  Mary E. Barclay was born about 1864 in Eagle Creek (Shakopee), Scott Co., Minnesota and died 19 February 1930 in Cascade Co., Montana.  She married Charles B. Clark probably in Minnesota for he was born there about 1856.  He died 28 February 1932 in Deer Lodge Co., Montana.  They had at least one child named Ruth Clark who was born about 1895.   It is interesting that there are two Mary’s named in John’s family a good 20+ years apart. 

11.  Anna Elizabeth Barclay was born 15 April 1870 in Shakopee, Scott Co., Minnesota and died 4 August 1955 in Menominee, Menominee Co., Michigan.  She married David Maurice Carter on 9 July 1885 in Eagle Creek (Shakopee), Scott Co., Minnesota.  David was born 9 January 1860, Marinette, Marinette Co., Wisconsin.  The information for this family was supplied by a cousin and has not been verified.  Anna had 4 children. 

The person that initiated the probate process for Alexander was his niece, my grandmother Grace A. Barclay McDonald.  She was pregnant at the time and lived in International Falls.  She was unable to attend the court sessions because she had the baby and was “indisposed.”  The baby was my Aunt Miriam. 

Book: Logsleds to Snowmobile’s, Pine River Centennial Celebration, 1873-1973, Written by the Citizens of Pine River and edited by Norman F. Clarke, Pine River Centennial Committee, 1979.  A copy is available at the Family History Library.

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